Sociology

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  • Building Bridges Where Needed on Chicago’s South Side

    NYT > Sociology
    14 Nov 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Rami Nashashibi is trying to replace mutual suspicion with respect and understanding between two groups that have clashed in the past.
  • UPSC Civil Services Main Exam 2013 Question Papers: Sociology Paper I - PrepSure

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:48 pm
    PrepSureUPSC Civil Services Main Exam 2013 Question Papers: Sociology Paper IPrepSureCandidates who are preparing for the Civil Services Main Exam in the forthcoming year, can find out what kind of questions were asked in this exam in the year 2013. Some questions from Sociology Paper I of UPSC Civil Services Main Exam 2013 are as ...and more »
  • Fijian academic to head Macmillan Brown Research Centre

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:58 pm
    The University of Canterbury has appointed Fijian academic Dr Steven Ratuva as professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and director of the prestigious Macmillan Brown Research Centre for Pacific Studies.
  • Community Engagement: Who is Best Served by Service Learning?

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales Community-engagement. This is a term that is used quite a bit amongst college and university presidents, administrators, faculty, staff, and students in thinking about ways that colleges and universities can bridge the town-gown divide between university campuses and the towns, neighborhoods, and/or cities in which they reside. At the same time, it’s a hot topic given the Obama administration and the Department of Education’s support for initiatives surrounding community and civic-engagement and learning. Some colleges view community-engagement as a form of…
  • Can you find the lecture about doxxing and vigilantes?

    Metafilter: Sociology
    Monochrome
    31 Oct 2014 | 12:09 pm
    Circa 2010 I saw a video of a talk on dangers of twitter and hacktivism. The man giving this presentation gave an example of a tweet that angered hacktivists. One of them doxxed the twitter user and found out his/her address. A flash mob of angry people showed up at the doorstep. But the wrong address had been used. Then someone died (the homeowner? someone in the crowd? I can't recall.) The speaker emphasized that this scenario was fictional, but its constituent phenomena are real. He said it was only a matter of time before it came true. Does anyone have a link to this video?
 
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • UPSC Civil Services Main Exam 2013 Question Papers: Sociology Paper I - PrepSure

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:48 pm
    PrepSureUPSC Civil Services Main Exam 2013 Question Papers: Sociology Paper IPrepSureCandidates who are preparing for the Civil Services Main Exam in the forthcoming year, can find out what kind of questions were asked in this exam in the year 2013. Some questions from Sociology Paper I of UPSC Civil Services Main Exam 2013 are as ...and more »
  • Sociology professor who banned full-faced veil in class killed in Bangladesh - Ecumenical News

    20 Nov 2014 | 1:56 pm
    Ecumenical NewsSociology professor who banned full-faced veil in class killed in BangladeshEcumenical NewsPolice have arrested at least 20 people questioning over the killing of Shafiul Islam, a sociology professor at Rajshahi University in northwest Bangladesh, Agence France-Presse reported. Islam was known as a follower of the folk group Baul, whose University Teacher Unpopular with Islamist Hardliners is Killed in BangladeshGlobal Voices OnlineRU teacher murder case a priority: IGPBangladesh News 24 hoursPolice made remarkable progress: IGPThe Daily Starall 26 news articles »
  • Sociology club 'bars' racial discrimination - V Spectator

    19 Nov 2014 | 10:55 pm
    Sociology club 'bars' racial discriminationV SpectatorThe sociology club has an ongoing petition for three Remerton Bars to remove their dress code signs. Flip Flops, Mulligans and Milltown are the bars with the signs that display phrases such as “No Sagging,” “No Grills,” and “No Baggy Clothes.” The and more »
  • How Long Can Eminem Keep It Up? (or: the Sociology of Aging Hip-Hop Artists) - Huffington Post

    18 Nov 2014 | 2:37 pm
    How Long Can Eminem Keep It Up? (or: the Sociology of Aging Hip-Hop Artists)Huffington PostLast week, a mechanical space probe landed on a moving comet -- traveling 84,000 mph -- about 310 million miles from Earth. This was an astonishing scientific breakthrough. But, like you, I'm more interested in hip-hop Twitter battles. Did you catch and more »
  • Sociology Club Talks Poverty, Land Use - North Idaho College Sentinel

    17 Nov 2014 | 8:04 pm
    North Idaho College SentinelSociology Club Talks Poverty, Land UseNorth Idaho College SentinelSince the start of the school year, the Sociology Club has been looking to bind the community together in making decisions about land use, poverty and charity, and they may have already sparked some inspiration into their audience. The club hosted
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Community Engagement: Who is Best Served by Service Learning?

    W. W. Norton
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales Community-engagement. This is a term that is used quite a bit amongst college and university presidents, administrators, faculty, staff, and students in thinking about ways that colleges and universities can bridge the town-gown divide between university campuses and the towns, neighborhoods, and/or cities in which they reside. At the same time, it’s a hot topic given the Obama administration and the Department of Education’s support for initiatives surrounding community and civic-engagement and learning. Some colleges view community-engagement as a form of…
  • Aging, Living, and Dying

    W. W. Norton
    17 Nov 2014 | 10:59 am
    By Karen Sternheimer As a college professor, my students are almost always the same age—with a few outliers—but I continue to get older, which occasionally becomes more salient. Recently we screened the documentary The Central Park Five in our department, a film focusing on the attack on a jogger in 1989 and the subsequent rush to judgment that led to the wrongful imprisonment of five teen boys. The incident took place when I was a college student living in New York, and before most of the students in attendance were born. When we talked about the film, they were just as interested in…
  • Social and Cultural Capital at School

    W. W. Norton
    14 Nov 2014 | 10:54 am
    By Sally Raskoff Have you ever thought about how your social relationships at school (and elsewhere) might help you in the future? Social capital, conceptualized by sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, includes economic resources that one gains from being part of a network of social relationships, including group membership. Cultural capital, also from Bourdieu, includes non-economic resources that enable social mobility. Examples of cultural capital would include knowledge, skills, and education. Both concepts remind us that social networks and culture have value. Bourdieu discussed other forms of…
  • A Socioanalysis of President Barack Obama

    W. W. Norton
    7 Nov 2014 | 2:31 pm
    By Peter Kaufman I am writing this post on the eve of the 2014 midterm elections, so I don’t know who the winners and losers will be. However, I do know one thing for sure: President Obama is not held in high regard these days. Obama’s approval rating is hovering around 42%, lower than the average approval ratings of the ten presidents that preceded him. For what it’s worth, Obama’s rating is actually significantly higher than the approval rating of Congress—the group of politicians whose partisan obstructionism and dogmatism are arguably responsible for much of Obama’s…
  • Weddings: Front Stage Performances

    W. W. Norton
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer Weddings are big productions. They often take months of planning that includes selecting decorations, invitations, food, music, dresses, tuxedoes, color schemes, seating charts, the wedding party and more. Weddings are a heightened example of what sociologist Erving Goffman called front stage behavior. Goffman viewed social life as something akin to a performance, where we attempt to manage the impressions we make to others. Weddings are clearly social performances: they involve guests, usually seated in the audience, and people involved in the wedding party play roles as…
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Can you find the lecture about doxxing and vigilantes?

    Monochrome
    31 Oct 2014 | 12:09 pm
    Circa 2010 I saw a video of a talk on dangers of twitter and hacktivism. The man giving this presentation gave an example of a tweet that angered hacktivists. One of them doxxed the twitter user and found out his/her address. A flash mob of angry people showed up at the doorstep. But the wrong address had been used. Then someone died (the homeowner? someone in the crowd? I can't recall.) The speaker emphasized that this scenario was fictional, but its constituent phenomena are real. He said it was only a matter of time before it came true. Does anyone have a link to this video?
  • Why were people so scared of "juvenile delinquents" in the 1950s?

    suburbanbeatnik
    20 Sep 2014 | 1:23 am
    I've been fascinated with 1950s-1960s stuff for a long time, and for just as long I've accepted that people back then were fascinated with evil, misbehaving youth, and indeed thought that "JDs" were a Huge Problem in Society (i.e. West Side Story, Blackboard Jungle, or Rebel Without A Cause). Yet it also seems people were genuinely terrified of Teens Gone Bad, in a way it's hard to wrap my modern brain around. But how did this come about? Why were so people scared of "juvenile delinquents," and why was this considered a societal problem on par with battling Communism? I started looking around…
  • Introductory sources on biological classification

    carter
    9 Jun 2014 | 7:53 am
    I'm beginning a project that looks partly at biological classification, primarily in western science. I have no background in this, and so I'm digging around. I'm interested to know more about the current rules for nomenclature, and also to know more about historical, philosophical, sociological, knowledge practice, ethnographic, anthropological, science technology and society (STS), sociotechnical, etc., approaches to the study of biological classification. I'll take monographs, articles, papers, web sites, etc. I have access to a university library. What are some good sources that can…
  • Pool Side Social Sciences.

    Milau
    2 May 2014 | 6:04 am
    I'm leaving for a much deserved vacation. I will be spending a lot of time reading by the pool. I'm looking for good social science reads. I'm trying to plan a few books that I could bring on my next vacation (this month). I used to be a huge fan of fiction but have found myself struggling to get into it lately. Instead, I seem to spend my time reading in either sociology, anthropology or history. I'm looking for "empirical" reads, that is, books that are focused on lived experiences. I've read and enjoyed theoretical stuff (Bourdieu, Foucault, Rancière, Butler, etc), but am looking for…
  • Do homeless individuals have codes of conduct or rules?

    mrmanvir
    19 Apr 2014 | 4:28 pm
    I recently learned that the panhandlers in my city (Cambridge, MA) often share their food when they get big items and it made me wonder - do homeless individuals often have explicit or implicit rules, like "share when you get food" or "the person who's been homeless the longest gets the best spot"? What do you think happens if people break the rule? I'm sure there's a lot of variation both within and between cities, but if anyone has any thoughts, I'd really appreciate it!
 
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • Why Do We Give to Charity?

    13 Nov 2014 | 6:41 am
    By Dr Siobhan HolohanIt’s Children in Need tomorrow. The day in the year when the British public come together to raise hundreds of millions of pounds for children’s charities around the country. For weeks or months individuals and groups of people have run marathons, held bake-offs, or worn silly costumes to fundraise for this worthy cause. No-one can deny that the projects supported by this money need to be funded. They provide, amongst many other things, safe places for children to go when they feel threatened at home, respite care for the many thousands of children who care for…
  • Insurance and the Speed Awareness Course

    5 Nov 2014 | 3:23 am
    This is a cross-posted fromparkingchallenge.blogspot.co.uk, a blog by AdamSnow (PhD Student, Criminology) that is dedicated to understanding and sharing ideas about road traffic regulation and the interplay between traffic law and society.An interesting piece in the Daily Telegraph leads with the headline "I took a speed awareness course and my car insurance doubled".  Of course this represents just one instance of one policy doubling in amount so perhaps one shouldn't get worked up about the 'doubling'.  Indeed the piece overall is quite balanced in how it reports insurance…
  • Project Update: Using Twitter in Sociology Teaching and Learning

    23 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    By Emma Head and Ala Sirriyeh We are now in the third week of our teaching innovation project.  We have asked students to complete a questionnaire detailing their use of social media and noting their perceptions of using social media in education.  Next week we will be running focus groups with students to discuss these topics in more detail.Ala has been making use to Twitter to alert students to news stories, journal articles, and other resources that are relevant to the 'Race', Racism, and Resistance module.  Seminar activities have also been documented in tweets.
  • A Sociology of the Seasons?

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    By Dr Andy ZieleniecAs a sociologist of culture or a cultural sociologist I am interested in the various ways in which we make and represent meaning to ourselves and to others. How we create and share and reflect on the present connected to the past and predicting, hoping and aspiring to some vision of the future. We do this within social contexts in which our material and physical environments also impact and influence our understanding of the social processes, forms and structures that affect our experiences of being in the world. An intrinsic part of this is how we interact with…
  • Stiegler’s University

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:21 am
    On Wednesday the first Sociology / Social Policy research seminar of the new academic year is scheduled. Mark Featherstone will talk about his recent work, 'Stiegler's University':Wednesday, 22nd October12pm-1pmCBC0.005AbstractIn this paper I read Stiegler’s work on youth, and especially his discussion of attention from Taking Care of Youth and the Generations, and the decadent society, formulated across three volumes of Disbelief and Discredit, through the lens of the contemporary university in order to develop a theory of the potentially utopian and dystopian conditions of higher…
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    Sociological Stew

  • How much control do parents have?

    9 Nov 2014 | 5:30 pm
    I read a Facebook post this morning by a young woman I know - mother of two daughters - and found myself utterly surprised to find that I no longer agree with her position. She said:"With few exceptions, kids are the way they are because that's how they're being TRAINED. If we don't like the current situation, we must do something differently."I might have said that myself forty years ago as a young sociologist. We sociologists were trained to think primarily in terms of nurture, and to lay everything at the foot of the "socialization" process. But I've seen a lot in the past 40 years and…
  • confessions of a former optimist

    6 Sep 2014 | 6:56 pm
    I have always been an optimist. Or perhaps I should say I was always an optimist until the last few years. This has little or nothing to do with my personal life experiences. I maintained an optimistic outlook during unemployment, poverty, cancer, divorce, and many other personal trials, and recent years have been kind to my husband and I in many ways. Moreover, my optimism  was not based on ignorance of the worlds problems and issues. My parents brought me up to be highly aware of the dire circumstance of poverty, war, brutality, pain and suffering that others in the world…
  • Why the Rich Hate Obama

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:23 am
    This morning I ran across an article "The Best Worst President Ever" by Mark Morford in SF Gate.  Morford observes a wealthy beneficiary of the economy under Obama proclaim Obama the "worst president ever." Morford then proceeds to give a litany of economic facts that provide ample evidence that this wealthy individual is almost certainly benefiting greatly from the economy during Obama's presidency. In the end Morford just laughs, and shakes his head at the "bizarre lament" of these crazy rich bastards. His only explanation is simple racism - rich white guys can't stand it that a black…
  • The Truths Hidden in Right Wing Survivalism

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    On a right wing web page, every other headline screams that Obama is responsible for impending disaster and doom to American society.  But hidden within the polarizing rhetoric is often startlingly accurate analysis of the real sources of the problems and the dangers facing America today: a capitalist economic system that enshrines greed and wanton wealth accumulation over economic and social stability and human needs. This short video is typical of the genre aimed at "patriots" and emphasizing individualism and family it provides a surprisingly fact based and astute analysis of…
  • Zombie America - Installment 5 UPDATED!

    6 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    America, the zombie nation that ONLY appears to be alive.  Excellent article about how economic reality on the ground of everyday life for most Americans contradicts the economic fantasies theory of economic and political elites who argue for more tax cuts for "job creators," also known as voodoo "trickle down" economics.See succinct article in Buzzflash  http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/trickle-down-economics-and-climate-deniers-face-an-insurmountable-challenge-realityThis is not debatable data: it is reality, like seeing rain gushing from the sky as proof that…
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    scatterplot

  • overheard

    jeremy
    22 Nov 2014 | 1:51 pm
    “The single most important piece of advice for the one-on-one meetings you have during a job interview is to LISTEN.”
  • academic name changes

    jeremy
    19 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    OW’s post about her problems from not changing her name reminds me of a question that came up last week in Bloomington over lunch. The question concerns women scientists — well, let’s start out by restricting attention to women sociologists — who are placed in tenure-line academic jobs. Some women have publication records in which they publish under one surname, and then later on–say, no earlier than after completion of their PhD–switch and publish under an entirely different surname. Leave the matter of name hyphenation out of this: I’m talking about…
  • name ghost

    olderwoman
    18 Nov 2014 | 6:08 am
    One way or another it is looking like it will cost me several hundred dollars and significant aggravation to deal with the fallout of US patriarchy. Back when I was married in 1970, the women’s movement was just kicking in and a summer employer insisted that they could not (would not) pay me unless I signed a form changing to my married name on my social security record. I never got a new card, however, and since that time, the only name I’ve used is my birth name.To do this, in the 1970s I had several times to verbally lie to self-appointed local government monitors of…
  • transparency as a matter of research ethics

    jeremy
    11 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    Apparently APSA has actually made a step toward open science as part of their ethical guidelines. According to a recent paper in Science: The American Political Science Association in 2012 adopted guidelines that made it an ethical obligation for researchers to “facilitate the evaluation of their evidence-based knowledge claims through data access, production transparency, and analytic transparency.” My understanding is that the ASA ethical guidelines are still stuck on the idea that people should get around to sharing data after they’ve finished all the articles they might want to…
  • step #1: repeat

    jeremy
    9 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    I was re-reading Feynman’s essay on “Cargo-Cult Science,” largely to look at the context of the marvelous quote “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself–and you are the easiest person to fool.” But farther on I saw this part about repeating experiments: When I was at Cornell, I often talked to the people in the psychology department. One of the students told me she wanted to do an experiment that went something like this–it had been found by others that under certain circumstances, X, rats did something, A. She was curious as to…
 
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    potlatch

  • Economic sociology of neoliberalism - interview recording

    Will
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:49 am
    I strongly recommend the economic sociology blog, Estudios de la Economia, run by Jose Ossandon and Tomas Undurraga. One of the nice things about the interviews they publish is how they break the questions down, and upload each answer separately, meaning you don't have to dive into one vast hour-long MP3. They've just published an interview I did with them a few weeks ago, discussing my book. It's the most theoretical and sociological discussion I've yet had about the book, and was provoked by some very sharp questions.
  • against the neo-behaviorists

    Will
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:31 am
    The LSE Impact Blog have been hosting a debate on the future of the social sciences, in anticipation of this event tomorrow evening, with Nicholas Christakis, whose article on the need to 'shake up' the social sciences made a bit of a stir last year. A more recent article by Amanda Goodall and Andrew Oswald lept enthusiastically aboard Christakis's bandwagon, from a British context. The tenor of this debate irks me. It employs the rhetoric of 'modernity' and 'anti-conservatism' in a similar way to Tony Blair, namely, to back all critics into corners where they do…
  • The Limits of Neoliberalism discussions

    Will
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    As part of the slow-burning promotion of my book, a couple of discussions have been published in recent weeks, exploring the book's arguments. Firstly, New Left Project published a two-part interview I did with Tom Mills, one of their editors. These can be read here [pt 1] and here [pt 2]. Secondly, Renewal organised a symposium of critical reviews of the book, with a response from me. I was really delighted with the quality of these commentaries from Bob Jessop, Stephanie Mudge and Jonathan Derbyshire. You can download the pdf of this symposium here. 
  • in praise of family existentialism

    Will
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    When it comes to the cultural injunctions of the Guardian and Radio 4, I'm pretty obedient. In the past couple of weeks, I've seen Richard Linklater's film Boyhood and ploughed through most of the second volume of Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle. The parallels are very striking, as many have noticed. On a superficial level, they include an attention to minor, arguably banal details of everyday life; a preoccupation with family and the parent-child relationship; a length that runs the risk of boredom; an absence of plot, conventionally understood; and above all, a heroic…
  • Listen to Big Ideas - what is neoliberalism?

    Will
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:31 am
    The Big Ideas event I spoke at on 'What is neoliberalism?' on Tuesday night turned out to be great fun, with unusually good questions and contributions from the audience. In case anybody would like to listen, here is a recording. It includes my talk, which lasts just over half an hour, and then an hour-long discussion.
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    orgtheory.net

  • hair

    fabiorojas
    22 Nov 2014 | 4:04 pm
    50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power
  • deportation suspension and legalization: a great first step – now, let’s open the borders

    fabiorojas
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:07 pm
    From the Washington Post article on the “insanely  confusing” path to citizenship. Last night, President Obama announced new policies that would allow approximately five million persons to live in peace without fear of deportation. If you have lived in the United States for five years and have no crimes, you can obtain a status that allows you to be a legal resident. A similar rule applies to people brought as children and those with family members who are here legally. All I can say is “bravo.” As much I applaud this action, it leaves serious problems unresolved.
  • obama and immigration amnesty: let this be the first step toward free migration

    fabiorojas
    19 Nov 2014 | 10:16 pm
    On Thursday, President Obama is scheduled to make a speech where he will likely announce an executive order that curtails some of the worst aspects of our immigration system, such as deportation of individuals who were brought to our country as children. I fully understand that Obama is a politician, not a magician. Even if he agreed that migration restrictions are unwise, he probably won’t act to pardon every undocumented immigrant. However, I do hope that tomorrow’s actions won’t be an excuse to restrict migration even more. Instead, I hope that amnesty, or deferral of…
  • q&a with hahrie han: part deux

    fabiorojas
    19 Nov 2014 | 4:01 pm
    We continue our Q&A with Hahrie Han on her new Oxford University Press book, How Organizations Develop Activists. Question 3. A crucial distinction in your book is mobilizing vs. organizing? What does that mean? The highest engagement organizations in my study combined what I call “transformational organizing” with “transactional mobilizing.” The difference between mobilizing and organizing really comes down to the extent to which organizations invest in developing people’s skills, motivations, and such as they do the work. Mobilizers are focused more on…
  • socinfo 2014 proceedings – for free!!!

    fabiorojas
    18 Nov 2014 | 5:01 pm
    That is correct: SocInfo 2014 convened down the street from this building. Last week, I was lucky to attend the SocInfo 2014 conference. It drew together scholars at the intersection of social science and computer science. I will write up some notes later, but I wanted you to know that, for a few weeks, Springer will make the Proceedings free: http://www.lajello.com/files/SocInfo_2014.zip. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Old Folks At Home . . . And Abroad

    22 Nov 2014 | 2:01 pm
    November 22, 2014Posted by Jay Livingston“We need to get rid of Obamacare,” says Ed Gillispie in a NYT op-ed yesterday (here). The reason: Obamacare’s “gravitational pull toward a single-payer system that would essentially supplant private insurance with a government program.”Gillespie, who lays out his credentials at the start of the article – he ran for Senate in Virginia and lost – notes that Obamacare is unpopular. But he omits all mention of a government-run single-payer system that happens to be very popular – Medicare. No Republican dare run on a platform of doing away…
  • Sexting and Gender

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:55 pm
    November 18, 2014.Posted by Jay LivingstonIMuch of Hanna Rosin’s recent Atlantic article “Why Kids Sext” plays on the generational divide. Parents get understandably upset about something that kids see as just another part of social life. Cops and prosecutors have an even more difficult time since a high schooler’s sexy cellphone selfie is a felony in most states. The media too aren’t sure how to play it. “Massive teen sexting ring,” gasped the headline in a local paper  in Louisa County, Virginia. A couple of high school kids had created an Instagram page with about 100…
  • Hope and Bugs, Of Course

    15 Nov 2014 | 10:03 am
    November 15, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonEver since I read Andrew Gelman’s list of words to avoid, I’ve been more conscious of the simple “of course.”  I still use it, but more sparingly and cautiously.  (Gelman’s list, here, includes obviously, clearly, interestingly, note that, and their variants like “it is interesting to note that.”) But then there’s the ironic “of course,” the one that points to some gem that is far from obvious. Done correctly, the casually tossed in “of course” makes us admire the author for spotting this sparkling insight. Maybe it…
  • Peter Freund

    11 Nov 2014 | 7:47 pm
    November 11, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonLast weekend we honored our colleague Peter Freund, who died in June. Peter and George Martin were the co-founders, in the 1970s, of our New York Walk – an unofficial, informal, and very loosely planned event for faculty, students, friends, anyone who wanted to join us.  It started as a one-off in the 1970s but became a semi-annual event. Our route usually took us to places like Grand Central Station (Peter loved showing students the whispering gallery there) and downtown sites (Lower East Side, Chinatown). But for Saturday’s reunion, we…
  • As Others See Us – Maybe Not

    9 Nov 2014 | 7:35 pm
    November 9, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonNational character has been sliding out of fashion for a long time.  Here is the Google nGrams chart for the appearance of that phrase in books since 1800.(Click on an image for a larger view.)Except for a brief comeback after World War II (there’s something about the Germans), the direction has been downhill,  perhaps because it sounds so much like ethnic or cultural stereotyping. Or maybe it was because valid research on it was difficult and unrewarding. Whatever. Ordinary people, though, have no difficulty in attributing personal…
 
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Sociology's Most Cited Papers by Decade

    14 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    My colleague Jim Moody sent along some interesting data this morning. Using the Web of Science database, he took the most-cited papers in Sociology and produced a Top 10 list for each decade going back to the 1950s. Not a table of which papers were most popular in those decades, but a table of which papers are now the most-cited from those decades. Note that the 1950s category is really “1950s and before”. The universe of citing papers is all of WoS. I absolve Jim of any responsibility for the figure I made from his data, or my comments below. Here’s a dotplot of the…
  • Scottish Independence

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    So, Scotland remains part of the United Kingdom. This morning on the bus (I should run a series called “Idle Data Analysis on the Bus”) I looked at how the high turnout compared to other Scottish elections. Data on turnout is easily available back to 1970. Here are two views of it. Voter turnout in Scotland in National elections and plebiscites since 1970. You can get a larger image or a PDF version of the figure if you want a closer look at it. As you can see, turnout for the Independence Referendum was both astonishingly high and way off-trend. In addition to the long-term…
  • Durkheim viva voce

    19 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    I just attended the American Sociological Association Meetings in San Francisco, and while there my friend Marion Fourcade told me about a remarkable little piece of sociological history. It’s an audio recording of Émile Durkheim delivering a talk. Emile Durkheim recorded in 1911 in Bologna. I had no idea such a thing existed. The recording is about two and a half minutes long. It’s a fragment of a piece titled Jugements de valeur et jugements de réalité, which you can read in French here. It was recorded in 1911 at a meeting in Bologna, which I think is one of only quite few…
  • An ASA Bingo Retrospective

    12 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    ASA Conference Bingo is on a permanent vacation pending its return around 2030 in a nostalgic comeback that warms the hearts of fans old and new. But as several people have asked me about it, here is a collection of the cards from years past. Not available in stores. 2008 Back in 2008, the groundbreaking first ASA Conference Bingo was so new and radical, it required instructions to play. Only 100 people saw this Bingo, but every one of them formed a benign gambling addiction. 2009 The difficult Second Bingo was presented with no such concessions but subtly higher production values. 2009 Bingo…
  • We're Hiring

    11 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    My department is looking to fill a tenure-track Assistant Professor line this Fall. Area of Specialization is Race/Ethnicity. If you have access to the ASA Job Bank, you can read the ad here. If you don’t have access to the ASA Job Bank, you can read the ad right here: Job ID: 10444 Date Position is Available: Fall 2015 Listing Active: 8/12/2014 to 10/11/2014 Title: Assistant Professor Department: Department of Sociology Company: Duke University Job Position/Rank: Academic Positions; Assistant Professor Special Program and Areas of Faculty Expertise: Racial and Ethnic Relations Region:…
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    Acta Sociologica

  • Book Review: Causality: Models, Reasoning, and Inference

    Elwert, F.
    5 Nov 2014 | 3:23 am
  • Evidence and interest in social theory: An ontological-practical approach

    Heiskala, R.
    5 Nov 2014 | 3:23 am
    What is social theory? This paper opens with a conception of social theory as an ontological approach explicating the nature of the worldview that we should adopt provided that the results of the most advanced empirical social science are true. After loosening the limitations of such a realist conception by introducing normative standards and dialogue with other provinces of meaning than science, it raises another question: How can we choose between various alternative conceptions in social theory? It seems that although the element of voluntaristic choice cannot be completely avoided, there…
  • The effects of social origins and cognitive ability on educational attainment: Evidence from Britain and Sweden

    Bukodi, E., Erikson, R., Goldthorpe, J. H.
    5 Nov 2014 | 3:23 am
    In previous work we have shown that in Britain and Sweden alike parental class, parental status and parental education have independent effects on individuals’ educational attainment. In this paper we extend our analyses, first by also including measures of individuals’ early-life cognitive ability, and second by bringing our results for Britain and Sweden into direct comparative form. On the basis of extensive birth-cohort data for both countries, we find that when cognitive ability is introduced into our analyses, parental class, status and education continue to have…
  • Book Review: Handbook of Causal Analysis for Social Research

    Teitler, J.
    5 Nov 2014 | 3:23 am
  • From a self-made to an already-made man: A historical content analysis of professional advice literature

    De Keere, K.
    5 Nov 2014 | 3:23 am
    Several scholars argue that self-expression has become a salient feature in the conception of the self at the expense of a more utilitarian perception of the individual. This article argues that this transition agrees with an evolution in how the relation between work and the self was perceived during the 20th century. A historical content analysis of advice literature on professional success shows how capitalism adapted itself to the aesthetic critique of alienation by revitalising the spirit of capitalism. The old spirit of capitalism that relied on self-control and discipline was replaced…
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • q&a with hahrie han: part deux

    fabiorojas
    19 Nov 2014 | 4:01 pm
    We continue our Q&A with Hahrie Han on her new Oxford University Press book, How Organizations Develop Activists. Question 3. A crucial distinction in your book is mobilizing vs. organizing? What does that mean? The highest engagement organizations in my study combined what I call “transformational organizing” with “transactional mobilizing.” The difference between mobilizing and organizing really comes down to the extent to which organizations invest in developing people’s skills, motivations, and such as they do the work. Mobilizers are focused more on…
  • Immigration

    Ahlswede Collection
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:25 pm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration
  • Teaching Social Justice with Harry Potter

    annamariel
    19 Nov 2014 | 12:20 pm
    I was lucky enough to have a childhood filled with Harry Potter books. I wouldn’t have wanted to grow up with any other series of books and it’s characters. That being said- I’ve always wondered how I could incorporate something so dear to me. Then I ran into a fantastic idea through a BuzzFeed article (commence eye rolls… yeah, yeah, i know, but it’s so great!) That being said, let’s dive in! 1.) The personal is political.  “There’s no better way to understand how something affects society as a whole than to feel its implications on a personal…
  • Why before how: “Distinctive and indispensable” beats “sophisticated but superfluous”

    Mark Suchman
    19 Nov 2014 | 11:02 am
    [Ed note: This is the 12th of 14 posts in a virtual panel on The Future of Organizational Sociology.] Organizational sociology, I would argue, has become increasingly sophisticated over the years; but it has done so in ways that make it less interesting to non-organizational sociologists and, hence, less able to survive outside the hothouse microclimate of a self-styled organizational studies program. From my particular vantage point in a sociology department on a campus without a business school, the problem is this: Most of my students – graduate as well as undergraduate – arrive in…
  • how did i get here?

    willteachfortravel
    19 Nov 2014 | 10:06 am
    Four months ago, my job did not even exist. There was no full-time, salaried position to teach online women’s and gender studies at Ball State University. In fact, this time last year I had zero intention of traveling and teaching full time—though that’s exactly where my life landed (and happily so). I loved the jobs I did have: teaching online courses at Ball State part-time and a few Sociology of Women courses online with the University of North Carolina Charlotte. Even when I packed up everything I owned in a storage unit and headed to Hawaii in January this year to teach and explore…
 
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Bad marriage, broken heart?

    20 Nov 2014 | 12:17 pm
    Older couples in a bad marriage -- particularly female spouses -- have a higher risk for heart disease than those in a good marriage, finds the first nationally representative study of its kind. read more
  • Digging for answers

    20 Nov 2014 | 12:17 pm
    On an archaeology field trip in New Mexico as an undergraduate in 2006, Dana Bardolph noticed something that struck her as an odd gender imbalance: The professor leading the dig was a men, while the graduate assistant and all but two of the 14 undergrads were women. read more
  • Acculturative stress found to be root cause of high depression rates in Latino youth

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:02 pm
    Researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis say acculturative stress may explain, in part, why Indiana's Latino youth face an alarming disparity in depression and suicide rates when compared to their white counterparts. read more
  • Major brain pathway rediscovered after century-old confusion, controversy

    18 Nov 2014 | 11:41 am
    A couple of years ago a scientist looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising. A large, fiber pathway that seemed to be part of the network of connections that process visual information showed up on the scans, but the researcher couldn't find it mentioned in any of the modern-day anatomy textbooks he had. read more
  • Symmetrical knees linked to Jamaican sprinting prowess

    18 Nov 2014 | 4:51 am
    Why is Jamaica, with a population smaller than that of Los Angeles, home to so many of the world's elite sprinters -- runners who compete in the 100, 200, 400 and 800-meter races? read more
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