Sociology

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  • Pro-marijuana 'tweets' are sky-high on Twitter

    eScienceNews: Sociology
    25 Jan 2015 | 9:23 am
    Analyzing every marijuana-related Twitter message sent during a one-month period in early 2014, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the "Twitterverse" is a pot-friendly place. In that time, more than 7 million tweets referenced marijuana, with 15 times as many pro-pot tweets sent as anti-pot tweets. read more
  • Methods are Beautiful

    chris uggen's weblog
    4 Jan 2015 | 1:28 pm
    Many TSP readers are more interested in research findings than the methodologies used to obtain them. But methods are often an important part of the story, such as new experimental studies that provide powerful tools for measuring discrimination. Backstage at TheSocietyPages.org, we're constantly arguing about whether a study's methods are strong enough to support its findings. And methods are so important that we won't run a piece unless we agree the underlying research is methodologically sound -- regardless of who produced it or where it…
  • Emotional Labor, Status, and Stress

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    27 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer Virtually no job comes without stress. Whether it’s meeting the expectations and deadlines of coworkers, clients, or supervisors, nearly all work can at times be challenging. Sometimes the work itself isn’t as challenging as managing relationships with the people we work with. Emotional labor involves managing our emotions to meet our job expectations.  For example, retail clerks are expected to be upbeat and enthusiastic about the merchandise (and in general), even if that is not truly how they feel. Emotional labor is also part of dealing with the…
  • Which Prisoners Get Visitors?

    chris uggen's weblog
    5 Aug 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better -- both while they're incarcerated and after they're released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation. The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure below shows, prisoners who are younger, white or…
  • LSU sociology professor researches the relationship between religion and educational attainment

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    23 Jan 2015 | 1:45 pm
    ( Louisiana State University ) Researchers have long studied and documented the influence religion has on social groups; however, few have examined the role it plays in education. LSU Sociology Professor Samuel Stroope recently penned a research article that examines the relationship between religion and educational attainment in the US. The article, titled, 'Social Context and College ...
 
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • Torah Sociology: The Dangers of Liberal Feminism - Arutz Sheva

    25 Jan 2015 | 6:06 am
    Torah Sociology: The Dangers of Liberal FeminismArutz ShevaI hope this article will help them better understand that you cannot have your sociological cake and eat it too; ie. that dynamic, engrossing careerism (male or female) comes at the expense of the type of family life that will make G-d and his Torah a
  • Sociology study finds young people favor sharing responsibilities in the household - UT The Daily Texan

    23 Jan 2015 | 2:37 am
    Sociology study finds young people favor sharing responsibilities in the householdUT The Daily TexanSociology assistant professor David Pedulla co-authored a study that shows young men and women in the U.S. prefer to have a relationship in which work and home life are shared equally between partners. Using the help of the GfK, a market and consumer ...
  • Sociology Students Study Homeownership in Manchester - Keene State College

    21 Jan 2015 | 12:38 pm
    Keene State CollegeSociology Students Study Homeownership in ManchesterKeene State CollegeThree sociology students, juniors Alyssa DeMarco and Ivy Stafford and senior Paige Agresti, assisted Professor of Sociology and Anthropology Margaret Walsh in an effort to learn how people make decisions about real estate, establish credit, compare
  • College Factual puts University's Econ and Sociology majors in top 10 - The Justice

    12 Jan 2015 | 9:57 pm
    College Factual puts University's Econ and Sociology majors in top 10The JusticeA higher education ranking website called College Factual has listed Brandeis as one of the top 10 schools in the country for undergraduate students seeking an Economics degree or a Sociology degree. The University was ranked sixth for its Sociology ...
  • Sociology Ranked No. 1 Nationally - Daily Nexus

    8 Jan 2015 | 5:14 am
    Sociology Ranked No. 1 NationallyDaily NexusThe Department of Sociology has been ranked number one in the country according to a ranking featured in USA Today based on findings by online database College Factual. College Factual, a website that offers information and resources to individuals ...
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Emotional Labor, Status, and Stress

    W. W. Norton
    27 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer Virtually no job comes without stress. Whether it’s meeting the expectations and deadlines of coworkers, clients, or supervisors, nearly all work can at times be challenging. Sometimes the work itself isn’t as challenging as managing relationships with the people we work with. Emotional labor involves managing our emotions to meet our job expectations.  For example, retail clerks are expected to be upbeat and enthusiastic about the merchandise (and in general), even if that is not truly how they feel. Emotional labor is also part of dealing with the…
  • Punk Rock Professors

    W. W. Norton
    23 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman It’s been said that “music soothes the savage beast.” Although that may be true, I think music can also have the opposite effect: it can turn the calm individual into a maelstrom of frenetic energy (think Animal from the Muppets). That’s certainly been my recent experience with music. For over 10 years, I’ve been part of a punk rock cover band called Questionable Authorities. There are five of us in the band: a biologist, a psychologist, and three sociologists. We are all tenured, well-respected professors at SUNY New Paltz who do typical professor things such as…
  • Community, Policing, and Accountability

    W. W. Norton
    21 Jan 2015 | 10:35 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales In response to the recent murders of unarmed black men by local police officers in Ferguson, Cleveland, Staten Island, and Oakland, to name a few, the Obama Administration created a task force to improve community policing.  The idea is that if police officers are embedded within the communities they serve, instances of racial profiling, and excessive use of violent force would be less likely to happen. The task force also hopes that community policing will help to facilitate greater conversation, interaction, and friendliness between police officers and…
  • Art and the Social Construction of Reality

    W. W. Norton
    16 Jan 2015 | 11:24 am
    By Karen Sternheimer What is art? This is an unanswerable question, certainly one that I will not attempt to answer in this post.  A recent visit to our local museum of contemporary art triggered this question, as I passed by exhibits including a plywood box, a drain, scribbles with hand-drawn maps on brown pieces of paper, sock puppets, as well as diary entries that including the creator’s daily weight, body temperature, and her body’s elimination schedule. For these pieces to be in a museum, someone must have declared them to have artistic merit (with which professional art critics…
  • The Birth Lottery and Global Inequality

    W. W. Norton
    13 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman When you think of inequality what comes to mind? As sociologists, many of us are trained to immediately point to the “holy trinity” of sociological analysis: race, gender, and class. We may think of the achievement gap in education, the gender pay gap, the extreme disparity between CEO pay and average worker pay, or toxic or environmental injustice as some of the typical manifestations of inequality. There is no denying the importance of race, class, and gender to any discussion of social stratification. However, there is another dimension of inequality that is arguably…
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • What is the Meaning of Syriza?

    28 Jan 2015 | 3:17 am
    By Dr Mark FeatherstoneWhat is the meaning of Syriza, the big winners in the Greek elections earlier this week, whose rise to power led the British Prime Minister, David Cameron, to warn against increased economic uncertainty and turbulence? The root of Cameron’s concern is clear – Syriza are against austerity and want to renegotiate the terms of Greece’s bailout package with the EU and centrally their German creditors. It is well documented, by writers such as Costas Douzinas, that Greece’s debt repayment plan has effectively destroyed the country’s social structure and left…
  • Keele Refugee Week 2015 Call for Events

    23 Jan 2015 | 1:42 am
    It may be five months away but we are already gearing up for Keele Refugee Week 2015! ‘Refugee Week is a UK-wide programme of arts, cultural and education events and activities that celebrates the contribution of refugees to the UK and promotes better understanding of why people seek sanctuary’ (Refugee Week 2015). Last year Keele University joined Refugee Week for the first time by hosting a weeklong photographic exhibition, an opening event with a musical performance and a poetry open mic night organised by students. This was co-organized by staff and students in the Faculty of…
  • New paper by Ala Sirriyeh on class and the new UK family migration rules

    14 Jan 2015 | 4:30 am
    In July 2012 the Conservative–Liberal Democrat Coalition government introduced a new set of family migration rules. These rules set a sharp increase in the minimum income threshold for people sponsoring partners and children to join them in the UK. Consequently, there has been a significant reduction in the number of visas granted through the family migration route. The journal Critical Social Policy has just published an article I have written which examines these new rules. The article is called ‘‘All need is love and £18,600’: class and the new UK family migration rules’ and…
  • Botswana Democracy ignored by the Global Media by Pnina Werbner

    12 Dec 2014 | 4:19 am
    Pnina Werbneris Professor Emerita in Anthropology at Keele University and author of The Making of an African Working Class: Politics, Law and Cultural Protest in the Manual Workers' Union of Botswana (Pluto Press 2014).  In this post Pnina considers how Western ‘bad news’ perspectives on Africa disguises the strength of civil society and trade unions in protecting democracy and the public interest.Botswanais the oldest, fully functioning democracy in Africa. You would never guess it, however, by the way in which the country is ignored by the western – and global – media. Bad news…
  • Research training award for Nicola Edwards

    9 Dec 2014 | 7:50 am
    Congratulations to Nicola Edwards, a student on the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice programme at Keele, on being awarded a fully funded place on a 3-day research training school in Barcelona in January.  The training school is run by a European intergovernmental organisation called COST (Cooperation in Science and Technology) which encourages research collaboration across Europe and the theme of the school is 'Offender Supervision in Europe'.  Nicola graduated from Keele this summer with a first class honours degree in Criminology and Sociology and she is continuing her…
 
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    scatterplot

  • one book, one _____

    jeremy
    28 Jan 2015 | 10:07 am
    My favorite contemporary novel, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, is the selection for One Book, One Chicago. I was surprised when I heard this, because I thought, “But… it’s a novel.” I realized that I’d just assumed that the trajectory of One Book, One Northwestern was a general phenomenon, where the history has been: 2014-5: Whistling Vivalidi, Claude Steele (non-fiction) 2013-4: Last Hunger Season, Roger Thurow (non-fiction) 2012-3: Never a City So Real, Alex Kotlowitz (non-fiction) 2011-2: Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Rebecca Skloot…
  • the personal touch

    jeremy
    27 Jan 2015 | 7:30 am
    I got a video message from Northwestern’s football coach about renewing my season tickets: http://www.nusports.com/video/Fitz_message_090.html The fun part is, if you change the 090 in the URL, you can see the greetings to other first names. As of now, it goes up to 108. He certainly does a better job than I would at being engaged through each of these different messages.
  • 7th annual fiscal sociology grad student workshop

    Dan Hirschman
    23 Jan 2015 | 10:11 am
    For the past six years, Isaac Martin, Monica Prasad, and Ajay Mehrotra have worked tirelessly to promote interest in “fiscal sociology” (the historical and sociological study of public finances, especially taxes). In addition to producing a great reader and publishing fantastic books on various aspects of the topic, they have also organized a one-day workshop each year for graduate students interested in fiscal sociology. As usual, the workshop will be held the day before SSHA (this year in Baltimore on November 11th), with a slightly different cast of instructors. Below is the…
  • arum and roksa, “aspiring adults adrift”

    andrewperrin
    7 Jan 2015 | 1:35 pm
    I am a fan of Richard Arum and Jospia Roksa’s first book, Academically Adrift, which examined predictors of growth in critical thinking skills during the first two years of college. In their new book, Aspiring Adults Adrift, Arum and Roksa follow the same cohort of students into the first couple of years after graduation. While conservative commentators honed in on the top-line finding in Academically Adrift–that only a small number of students increased critical thinking much at all in those two years–in my view the most useful information is below that particular fold.
  • how long should asa papers be allowed to be?

    jeremy
    4 Jan 2015 | 11:12 pm
    My last post noted that ASA changed its rule from having a 20 page limit to having now saying 15-35 pages. I think this is a good change. Fabio dissents: Dissent here: I oppose paper bloat. Thus, I always praised the 20 page limit because it forced people to get to the point. You only have 15 minutes to present, for crying out loud. My view on this is that I would never write a paper just so I can present at ASA, and I wouldn’t advise anyone else to, either, except maybe people who are in positions where they have no interest in publishing but are really desperate for travel funds. In…
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    potlatch

  • the seduction of behaviorism

    Will
    13 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    I have a piece in The New Inquiry, entitled 'The Data Sublime', exploring the strange everyday appeal of technologies of surveillance and control. My tentative hypothesis is that there is something psychoanalytic going on here, involving the desire to be dominated by incomprehensible data analytics, which liberal assumptions about 'trade-offs' (between freedom and security, or autonomy and convenience etc) completely overlook. Here's a chunk: The notorious Facebook experiment on “emotional contagion” was understandably controversial. But would it be implausible to…
  • Governing through unhappiness

    Will
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:24 am
    Every sector, every profession, which can plausibly lay a claim to the 'public interest', is currently resisting austerity in one simple fashion: claiming that by hitting the sector or profession concerned, the real losers will be the public. Ironically the one industry that is now the greatest recipient of public financial beneficence, namely financial services, seems to have lost all sense of the public ever having an interest in the first place. I guess that's how they achieved such an extraordinary level of political arbitrage in the first place. So more fool the rest of us.
  • Economic sociology of neoliberalism - interview recording

    Will
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:49 am
    I strongly recommend the economic sociology blog, Estudios de la Economia, run by Jose Ossandon and Tomas Undurraga. One of the nice things about the interviews they publish is how they break the questions down, and upload each answer separately, meaning you don't have to dive into one vast hour-long MP3. They've just published an interview I did with them a few weeks ago, discussing my book. It's the most theoretical and sociological discussion I've yet had about the book, and was provoked by some very sharp questions.
  • against the neo-behaviorists

    Will
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:31 am
    The LSE Impact Blog have been hosting a debate on the future of the social sciences, in anticipation of this event tomorrow evening, with Nicholas Christakis, whose article on the need to 'shake up' the social sciences made a bit of a stir last year. A more recent article by Amanda Goodall and Andrew Oswald lept enthusiastically aboard Christakis's bandwagon, from a British context. The tenor of this debate irks me. It employs the rhetoric of 'modernity' and 'anti-conservatism' in a similar way to Tony Blair, namely, to back all critics into corners where they do…
  • The Limits of Neoliberalism discussions

    Will
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    As part of the slow-burning promotion of my book, a couple of discussions have been published in recent weeks, exploring the book's arguments. Firstly, New Left Project published a two-part interview I did with Tom Mills, one of their editors. These can be read here [pt 1] and here [pt 2]. Secondly, Renewal organised a symposium of critical reviews of the book, with a response from me. I was really delighted with the quality of these commentaries from Bob Jessop, Stephanie Mudge and Jonathan Derbyshire. You can download the pdf of this symposium here. 
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    orgtheory.net

  • blogging is like exercise

    epopp
    28 Jan 2015 | 6:50 pm
    Blogging is like exercise. It feels great as long as you stay in the habit. But once you stray, for whatever reason, boy is it hard to get back in the saddle. Not only have I been a bad blogger, I’ve been cheating on you with another blog. But I swear it was just a one-time thing. Dan Hirschman and I wrote a piece on “The Influence of Economists on Public Policy” for the Oxford University Press economics blog. Although we wrote it last week, it ended up being pretty timely given the chatter over Justin Wolfer’s recent Upshot piece about how economists came to dominate…
  • party in the street: by the numbers

    fabiorojas
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:10 pm
    328 pages 196 research assistants 11 years 3 children born 8,638 street surveys 66 debate transcripts 20 protest waves 150 proposed pieces of legislation 29 diagrams 11 pictures 2 authors 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($1!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street!! 
  • that time nabokov trash talked boris pasternak

    fabiorojas
    27 Jan 2015 | 4:06 pm
    From Open Culture. Nabokov: I’ve been perplexed and amused by fabricated notions about so-called “great books.” That, for instance, Mann’s asinine Death in Venice, or Pasternak’s melodramatic, vilely written Doctor Zhivago, or Faulkner’s corncobby chronicles can be considered masterpieces, or at least what journalists term “great books,” is to me the same sort of absurd delusion as when a hypnotized person makes love to a chair. Sick burn, Vlad. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($1!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street!! 
  • christakis’ query

    fabiorojas
    26 Jan 2015 | 4:02 pm
    Last year, Nicholas Christakis argued that the social sciences were stuck. Rather that fully embrace the massive tidal wave of theory and data from the biological and physical sciences, the social sciences are content to just redo the same analysis over and over. Christakis’ used the example of racial bias. How many social scientists would be truly shocked to find that people have racial biases? If we already know that (and we do, by the way), then why not move on to new problems? Christakis’ was recently covered in the media for his views and for attending a conference that tries…
  • walk like a penguin

    katherinechen
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:12 am
    With the impending blizzard anticipated for the East Coast, now’s the time to review how to walk on snow and ice. Yesterday, while walking along a park in an effort to get some exercise, I had several moments of la-la-la – arghhhh! flail! flail! flail! while recovering my balance on innocuous-looking patches of ice-water. Don’t be me (or worse, one of the unlucky colleagues who falls and dies from fall injuries) and see if the below tip about walking like a penguin works for you. Or, better yet, stay inside, cozy up with your favorite drink, and attend to your latest…
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Patriots and Scoundrels

    25 Jan 2015 | 7:22 am
    January 25, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonSunday, and no football. But we’ll always have Belichick and Brady. I’m not saying that the Patriots are out-and-out liars. But they are outliers. The advantage of an underinflated ball, like the eleven of the twelve footballs the Patriots used last Sunday, is that it’s easier to grip. Ball carriers will be less likely fumble if they’re gripping a ball they can sink their fingers into. We can’t go back and measure the pressure of balls the Patriots were using before the Colts game, but Warren Sharp (here) went back and dug up the data on…
  • Ward Swingle (1927-2015)

    23 Jan 2015 | 3:32 pm
    January 23, 2015Posted by Jay Livingston(Not sociology but, to borrow Chris Uggen’s term, “self-indulgery.”)Ward Swingle died last week. A few weeks earlier, I had been listening to this video of Andras Schiff playing the Bach C-minor partita, and I heard him play a wrong note in the Sinfonia. Maybe not wrong, but not what Bach wrote – a C instead of a B♭.*  Ward Swingle was the reason I knew.In 1963, Phillips released “Bach’s Greatest Hits” – Bach compositions done the Swingle Singers, a vocal octet, plus drums and one of Europe’s top jazz bassists, Pierre Michelot).
  • What You Mean, “We”?*

    20 Jan 2015 | 12:03 pm
    January 20, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonWhat do we mean when we say “we”? Or more to the point, what does the president mean when he uses that word?  The Atlantic has an interactive graphic (here) showing the relative frequencies of words in State of the Union addresses. (“Addresses” because I’m choosing my words carefully. These were not “speeches” until Wilson. Before that, it was written text only.) Here “we” is.(Click on thechart for a larger view.)The rise of “we” seems to parallel the rise of big government, starting with Wilson and our entry into a world war,…
  • Dissed Again

    18 Jan 2015 | 1:37 pm
    January 18, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonSociology is the Rodney Dangerfied of social science. The latest insult comes from economist Noah Smith. On his Noahpinion blog, he posted two pictures of faux zoo animals: a dog that a Chinese zoo tried to pass off as a lion; and a “panda” in an Italian circus that was really a chow painted black and white.But why did Smith say that his post was “a blaze of amateur sociology”?*Smith does not mention sociology in the post, nor does he use any sociological terms, as if to suggest that the amateur sociology dig is so obvious that it needs no…
  • Gifted and Talented – Academics and Athletes

    16 Jan 2015 | 4:20 pm
    January 16, 2015Posted by Jay Livingston Can women be brilliant?  Apparently, academics don’t think so, at least not according to some research reported in The Chronicle (here).  New research has found that women tend to be underrepresented in disciplines whose practitioners think innate talent or "brilliance" is required to succeed.Women might be successful in those fields, but while the top men in those fields will be seen as having some ineffable je ne sais quoi – in the words of the survey questionnaire, “a special aptitude that just can’t be taught” – women…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • American Movie

    19 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Update, January 22nd: Now with plots standardized per thousand films released that year. It’s time for another episode of Data Analysis on the Bus. This one follows from an exchange on Twitter, prompted by the coverage of American Sniper about the tendency to use the word “American” in film titles, especially when you want things to sound terribly serious. This led to a bit of freewheeling and it has to be said perhaps tendentious cultural theorizing on my part. Rather more usefully, it also prompted Benjamin Schmidt to send me some IMDB data containing film titles with the…
  • Failure in Complex Systems

    14 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    After listening to the hosts discuss probability on ATP this week, I was most of the way through writing something that, had I finished it, would have been this Dr Drang post only not nearly as good. (I will confess that my motivation was exactly the same as his: “People believe John”.) In fairness I don’t blame them for getting confused, because probability really is confusing and I’m terrible at it myself. Seeing as the good doctor has already intervened, there’s no need to repeat what he said. But let me add a small coda. Dr Drang wonders why things went off…
  • Visualizing Philosophy Rankings

    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    The new Philosophical Gourmet Report Rankings are out today. The report ranks a selection of Ph.D programs in English-speaking Philosophy departments, both overall and for various subfields, on the basis of the judgments of professional philosophers. The report (and its editor) has been controversial in the past, and of course many people dislike the idea of rankings altogether. But as these things go the PGR is pretty good. It’s a straightforward reputational assessment made by a panel of experts from within the field. Raters score departments on a scale of zero to five in half-point…
  • The Godfather's End of Semester Meetings

    29 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    FADE FROM BLACK: PROF. CORLEONE’S OFFICE. DAY. BONASENIOR: … But the Associate Dean said it was out of his hands. And then my Mom texted me and said, “For extra credit opportunities, we must go to Professor Corleone.” PROF. CORLEONE: Why did you go to the Associate Dean? Why didn’t you come to me first? BONASENIOR: What do you want of me? Tell me anything. But do what I beg you to do. PROF. CORLEONE: What is that? [BONASENIOR whispers his request into PROF. CORLEONE’S ear.] PROF. CORLEONE: That I cannot do. BONASENIOR: I’ll give you anything you ask.
  • Fly Air Gini

    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    The other day at OrgTheory, Beth Berman had a very nice discussion on “inequality in the skies” about how much of space on planes is given over to different classes of passenger. Using seating charts, she calculated some rough Gini coefficients of inequality on board. For example, on a transatlantic flight in a three-class configuration with fancy lie-flat beds up front, if we look again at how the space is distributed, we now have 21% of the people using about 40% of the plane, 27% using another 20%, and the final 52% using the last 40%. The Gini index has now increased, to 25.
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    chris uggen's weblog

  • Public Criminology and the Social Media Echo Chamber

    23 Jan 2015 | 11:07 am
    When the news came from Ferguson on November 24th, it was hard to know what to do. Every sociologist and criminologist possesses some pertinent expertise, whether we study violence, law, race, or criminal justice and injustice. But how and when should we engage? The streets were alive with protesters, police officers, and journalists. The President was calling for calm, which was itself a polarizing message. And Facebook feeds flowed with horrifying videos, rage, and invective, as many were “defriending” and “unfollowing” one another until their social networks were fully…
  • Methods are Beautiful

    4 Jan 2015 | 1:28 pm
    Many TSP readers are more interested in research findings than the methodologies used to obtain them. But methods are often an important part of the story, such as new experimental studies that provide powerful tools for measuring discrimination. Backstage at TheSocietyPages.org, we're constantly arguing about whether a study's methods are strong enough to support its findings. And methods are so important that we won't run a piece unless we agree the underlying research is methodologically sound -- regardless of who produced it or where it…
  • Why Sex Offenders are Running for Office

    17 Oct 2014 | 11:40 am
    Locked Out (creative commons image by Jared Rodriguez)The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports that a group of "sex offenders" are registering to vote and plan to run for elected office. I put "sex offenders" in quotations because these voters and office-seekers are not currently under supervision for any crime. Instead, they are "civilly committed," which means that they have either already completed their criminal sentences or, as is the case for over 50 clients, they were never charged as an adult for a sex offense. Although they are euphemistically called "clients" rather than…
  • Which Prisoners Get Visitors?

    5 Aug 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better -- both while they're incarcerated and after they're released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation. The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure below shows, prisoners who are younger, white or…
  • Real Gutter Stories

    9 Jul 2014 | 8:52 am
    It takes courage to tell a big audience of strangers how your picture somehow ended up next to the headline "Drug Bust Nets Large Haul: Police Find Cocaine, Methamphetamine, and Viagra." The excellent Life of the Law podcast team brought a series of such painfully honest and powerful stories to the stage this summer. These two are my favorites, from two outstanding young scholars and friends.
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Welcome to Boxing the Ego

    Marissa Faith
    27 Jan 2015 | 6:02 am
    ‘Beneath the surface a person is suffering from a deadly boredom that makes everything seem meaningless and empty … as if the initial encounter with the Self casts a dark shadow ahead of time’. Psychotherapist Carl Jung considered as a perennial danger in life that ‘the more consciousness gains in clarity, the more monarchic becomes its content … the king constantly needs the renewal that begins with a descent into his own darkness’ — his shadow – which the ‘dissolution of the persona ‘sets in motion. The encounter with the shadow plays a…
  • The Shadow IS Energy

    Marissa Faith
    27 Jan 2015 | 5:58 am
    “The shadow personifies everything that the subject refuses to acknowledge about himself “and represents “a tight passage, a narrow door, whose painful constriction no one is spared who goes down to the deep well”. These unacceptable parts of one’s own personality represented by the shadow archetype are particularly likely to give rise to some kind of projection and are commonly found in the neurotic or psychotic, and in personalities functioning at a primitive/animalistic level as in narcissistic personality disorder or borderline personality disorder. The sacred function of the…
  • History or herstory? Our story.

    Charlotte
    27 Jan 2015 | 5:46 am
    Liberty Leading the People, 1830, Eugène Delacroix. Borrowed here. For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been working on the nitty-gritty-analysing part of my bachelor thesis. Not going too much into that (as I find it better to finish it first before sharing my findings) I do, however, want to touch upon a connected subject: the theme of women and their (our) role in history. A female professor of mine once posed the question: why is it called history? Why not herstory? This question, I think, exemplifies very well the core of the issue. A one-sidedness. I read an article in the morning…
  • Tuesday Police Fun: Former Kinloch official says she was assaulted by police

    talesfromtheconspiratum
    27 Jan 2015 | 5:27 am
    The Free Thought Project. By John Vibes on January 25, 2015 Kinloch, Missouri – Theda Wilson, the former mayor of a Missouri town says that she was assaulted by police after she called 911 to report a burglary in her apartment complex. “In the back of my apartment I called 9-1-1 thinking they were going to help,” Wilson said.Unfortunately, “help” is rarely what actually arrives when the police are called, as Wilson soon found out.As the police arrived, Wilson approached them and let them know that a suspicious person was seen going in and out of a nearby building. That is when…
  • Mental Illness Bloggers are in Touch with their Vulnerability and Humanity

    gentlekindness
    26 Jan 2015 | 10:54 pm
    Blogs about mental illness are some of the most captivating blogs that I love to read. I am interested in the topics they cover but that is not the only reason why they speak to me. Bloggers that have struggled with mental illness have had to learn to be in touch with their humanity. In order to write your own mental illness, you have to dive deep into the darkest corners of your mind. The descriptions that they write are very vivid and full of human depth. There is a sense of soul searching that draws you into the posts. I am not just counting the blogs that identify themselves as having…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • How creative are you? Depends where you're from

    27 Jan 2015 | 12:54 pm
    With the "creative class" on the rise, many businesses are trying to capitalize on imagination and innovation. But when it comes to creative juices, some societies have a faster flow than others. That's because, as new research from Concordia University suggests, creativity is tied to culture. read more
  • Girls lead boys in academic achievement globally

    27 Jan 2015 | 11:36 am
    Considerable attention has been paid to how boys' educational achievements in science and math compare to girls' accomplishments in those areas, often leading to the assumption that boys outperform girls in these areas. Now, using international data, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Glasgow in Glasgow, Scotland, have determined that girls outperform boys in educational achievement in 70 percent of the countries they studied -- regardless of the level of gender, political, economic or social equality. read more
  • Ads effective even in the midst of multitasking, studies find

    26 Jan 2015 | 6:32 pm
    Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of your multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as the ads you're really watching, such as those during the Super Bowl, says a University of Illinois researcher. read more
  • Pro-marijuana 'tweets' are sky-high on Twitter

    25 Jan 2015 | 9:23 am
    Analyzing every marijuana-related Twitter message sent during a one-month period in early 2014, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the "Twitterverse" is a pot-friendly place. In that time, more than 7 million tweets referenced marijuana, with 15 times as many pro-pot tweets sent as anti-pot tweets. read more
  • Why all-nighters don't work: How sleep and memory go hand-in-hand

    23 Jan 2015 | 4:33 pm
    Want to ace that test tomorrow? Here's a tip: Put down the coffee and hit the sack. read more
 
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    Jonathan Rex

  • The “First Contact” Myth

    jrex365
    28 Jan 2015 | 5:46 pm
    Below is a collection of documented accounts of  Europeans, North Africans, Sephardic Jews and numerous other groups in the Cherokee lands long before traditionally taught. History was so much more complex and mixing was so much more prevalent than we’ve all been led to believe. In order to herd people like sheep you have to feed their minds simplistic narratives which they can memorize and repeat back like parrots. “Contact” didn’t begin with the English in the 1700’s, the Vikings reached the Carolinas a couple hundred years before the rest of Europe and the…
  • American Me

    jrex365
    27 Jan 2015 | 8:13 pm
    For a good chunk of my life (I’m only 33 haha), I struggled with my identity as an American. I used to ask myself (and then others cynically), “What does it mean to be an American?” Like an asshole I already had a list of answers I knew they would typically give and had snide remarks pre-planned to accost them with once they stepped into my trap. The truth was I wanted somebody to shut me up. I was hoping I’d encounter somebody witty enough (and confident enough) to answer my rhetorical question in a way that I couldn’t completely dissect and destroy. Nobody ever did. But I found…
  • Cherokee Women

    jrex365
    27 Jan 2015 | 4:08 pm
    I opened Cherokee Women today and finished it in one sitting. This is an important book that all women could benefit from reading. The first and final chapter (1 and 7) were for me the most interesting. Chapter One deals with how traditional Cherokee culture was structured in terms of gender. Chapter Seven brings the book back full circle to Chapter One by discussing the Christianization of Cherokee women. While Judeo-Christian Europe and the new American Colonies were rooted in patriarchal hierarchies Cherokee culture was defined by women. Women didn’t just play a role in society. They…
  • A Cherokee Tale: Part II

    jrex365
    27 Jan 2015 | 11:05 am
    In 1617 the young Thomas Passmere Carpenter met Matoaka in London. The Powhatan woman, now an international legend through numerous embellished stories and by the popularity of a Disney cartoon named Pocahontas, was a real woman. As one among many of King Wahunsenacawh’s children, Matoaka was a “Princess” according to European society. Kidnapped as a young girl by the settlers of Jamestown she was taken captive as a way of forcing peace with her father, popularized as Chief Powhatan. While in Jamestown she was taught English, dressed in English fashions, converted to Christianity,…
  • A Cherokee Tale: Part I

    jrex365
    25 Jan 2015 | 6:52 pm
    Dedicated to my Grandfather, Raymond Cordial “Until we meet again, Ugvwiyuhi.” My grandfather was born in Floyd County, Kentucky. From what I’ve been told he stopped going to school after 6th grade, went to work full time in the coal mines, began selling bootleg liquor with his brothers and enlisted in the Army at Fort Hayes in Columbus Ohio for the Hawaiian Division during WWII. After his enlistment in the U.S. Army he returned to the mountains of Kentucky with a newly acquired motorcycle, married my grandmother and brought my mother into the world. He and my grandmother Mattie went on…
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