Sociology

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  • Race Expert Discusses State of Race in America Resulting from Michael Brown Shooting

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    18 Aug 2014 | 2:04 pm
    Newswise — Dr. JeffriAnne Wilder is a sociologist and scholar specializing in diversity, race relations and gender issues. She is currently a tenured Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of North Florida.
  • Who Feels Inferior? A Test of the Status Anxiety Hypothesis of Social Inequalities in Health

    European Sociological Review
    Layte, R., Whelan, C. T.
    6 Aug 2014 | 9:32 pm
    The empirical association between income inequality, population health, and other social problems is now well established, and the research literature suggests that the relationship is not artefactual. Debate is still ongoing as to the cause of this association. Wilkinson, Marmot, and colleagues have argued for some time that the relationship stems from the psycho-social effects of status comparisons. Here, income inequality is a marker of a wider status hierarchy that provokes an emotional stress response in individuals that is harmful to health and well-being. We label this the…
  • Siblings and Sociology

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    13 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer If you have siblings, you might feel like you have little in common with them despite growing up in the same family. I have certainly known families where siblings couldn’t have been more different, with diverging value systems, political beliefs, and aspirations. Then again, some siblings share many similar attributes, educational strengths and even career aspirations. I’ve known brothers who joined the same fraternity during their college years, and siblings who chose to attend the same out-of-state university years apart. I remember years ago my mother and her…
  • "Another universal pattern is that as soon as a popular reading culture gets established,..."

    Like Bake a Cake
    20 Aug 2014 | 11:41 am
    ““Another universal pattern is that as soon as a popular reading culture gets established, commentators start worrying about the decline of reading.”” - Griswold et al,’s “Reading and the Reading Class in the Twenty-First Century.” 
  • Collective Memory and the Danger of Forgetting

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer A few years ago I wrote about the importance of collective memories following the centennial coverage of the sinking of the Titanic. Collective memories are societal-level memories, shared by regularly told stories, and are often events we might have intimate knowledge of even if we weren’t born when they occurred. This year marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion at Normandy, the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, and the 20th anniversary of O.J. Simpson’s “slow speed chase” and subsequent arrest. Why are these events part of our…
 
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    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Alamon: The promise circa 2014

    21 Aug 2014 | 7:08 am
    FROM the assertion that structure begets consciousness and not the other way around to the intimation that our deepest troubles and fears, and the most private acts such as suicide are determined in a large part by social imperatives, Sociology had always taken the difficult task of demystification – to lay bare what is concealed.
  • Researchers examine parental availability and kids’ eating habits

    20 Aug 2014 | 12:13 am
    The way parents balance their work schedules may affect their adolescent children's eating habits, according to Penn State researchers. Those schedules may be even more important than the number of hours the parents spend at work, said Molly Martin, associate professor of sociology and demography.
  • How parents juggle work hours may influence kids' weight

    19 Aug 2014 | 2:45 pm
    ( Penn State ) The way parents balance their work schedules may affect their adolescent children's eating habits, according to Penn State researchers.
  • Race Expert Discusses State of Race in America Resulting from Michael Brown Shooting

    18 Aug 2014 | 2:04 pm
    Newswise — Dr. JeffriAnne Wilder is a sociologist and scholar specializing in diversity, race relations and gender issues. She is currently a tenured Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of North Florida.
  • The Sociologist as Messiah

    18 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    WHEN Auguste Comte founded Sociology at the wake of the turmoil of French society after the revolution, he imagined the discipline to be the new secular religion. At that time, the great transformations in Western European economy and society reverberated as well in the hearts and minds of people. What once was the exclusive dominion of Christianity particularly Catholicism, in its stead was a ...
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Siblings and Sociology

    W. W. Norton
    13 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer If you have siblings, you might feel like you have little in common with them despite growing up in the same family. I have certainly known families where siblings couldn’t have been more different, with diverging value systems, political beliefs, and aspirations. Then again, some siblings share many similar attributes, educational strengths and even career aspirations. I’ve known brothers who joined the same fraternity during their college years, and siblings who chose to attend the same out-of-state university years apart. I remember years ago my mother and her…
  • Being There: Understanding Sociology through Film

    W. W. Norton
    5 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer It’s summer, and for me that means a chance to watch movies. I tend to prefer classics to the latest releases, and I recently re-watched the 1979 film Being There, starring Peter Sellers. It is filled with sociological (and political) insights about the ways in which our social interactions create meaning. The film is about a mentally challenged man named Chance who works as a gardener for an elderly man. When the man passes away, Chance is on his own. No provisions are made for his care, so he wanders the streets, hungry and unsure of how to appropriately interact with…
  • The Never-Ending Beauty Shift

    W. W. Norton
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:17 am
    By Peter Rydzewski Sociology Ph.D. student, University of Maryland The idea that physical characteristics can be socially developed may be difficult to consider at first. According to Raewyn Connell, however, “bodies are both objects of social practice and agents in social practice” (p.67). This means that while most of our appearance is commonly attributed to gene composition and biological parents’ body characteristics, discussions about the power of gender expectations, although sometimes missed, continue to play a large role in the development of the way that we look. For most of…
  • Obedience, Authority, and Domination

    W. W. Norton
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:48 am
    By Peter Kaufman “Because I said so!” I’m sure that many of us have either uttered these words or have heard them spoken to us. We hear this phrase expressed in a host of relationships: parent-child, teacher-student, supervisor-employee, and police officer-citizen. Saying this to someone is generally used to get them to obey your authority and do what you are telling them to do with as little resistance as possible. When we think about obedience to authority, we often think of the famous study by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. Most students have probably learned about the…
  • Collective Memory and the Danger of Forgetting

    W. W. Norton
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer A few years ago I wrote about the importance of collective memories following the centennial coverage of the sinking of the Titanic. Collective memories are societal-level memories, shared by regularly told stories, and are often events we might have intimate knowledge of even if we weren’t born when they occurred. This year marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion at Normandy, the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, and the 20th anniversary of O.J. Simpson’s “slow speed chase” and subsequent arrest. Why are these events part of our…
 
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    SagePub: Sociology

  • Book Review: Rosi Braidotti, Patrick Hanafin and Bolette Blaagaard (eds), After Cosmopolitanism

    Pollmann, A.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:28 am
  • 'I've Learnt What a Dad Should Do': The Interaction of Masculine and Fathering Identities among Men Who Attended a 'Dads Only' Parenting Programme

    Dolan, A.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:28 am
    This article is based on qualitative research with men who voluntarily attended a ‘dads only’ parenting programme. The article explores men’s motivations to attend and demonstrates some of the challenges relating to masculine identity that fathers face when seeking support regarding their children. It also highlights how aspects of masculinity may shape men’s limited knowledge concerning the needs of their children and their capabilities as ‘involved’ fathers. The article then explores how men made sense of their changing thoughts and practices regarding…
  • Big Data: Methodological Challenges and Approaches for Sociological Analysis

    Tinati, R., Halford, S., Carr, L., Pope, C.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:28 am
    The emergence of Big Data is both promising and challenging for social research. This article suggests that realising this promise has been restricted by the methods applied in social science research, which undermine our potential to apprehend the qualities that make Big Data so appealing, not least in relation to the sociology of networks and flows. With specific reference to the micro-blogging website Twitter, the article outlines a set of methodological principles for approaching these data that stand in contrast to previous research; and introduces a new tool for harvesting and analysing…
  • Analytic Affordance: Transcripts as Conventionalised Systems in Discourse Studies

    Gibson, W., Webb, H., vom Lehn, D.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:28 am
    This article explores the role of transcripts in the analysis of social action. Drawing on a study of the interactional processes in optometry consultations, we show how our interest in the rhythm of reading letters from a chart arose serendipitously from our orientation to transcription conventions. We discuss our development of alternative transcription systems, and the affordances of each. We relate this example to constructivist debates in the area of transcription and argue that the issues have been largely characterised in political terms at the expense of a focus on the actual…
  • Domiciliary Care: The Formal and Informal Labour Process

    Bolton, S. C., Wibberley, G.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:28 am
    Domiciliary carers are paid care workers who travel to the homes of older people to assist with personal routines. Increasingly, over the past 20 years, the delivery of domiciliary care has been organised according to market principles and portrayed as the ideal type of formal care; offering cost savings to local authorities and independence for older people. Crucially, the work of the former ‘home help’ is transformed as domiciliary carers are now subject to the imperative of private, competitive accumulation which necessitates a constant search for increases in labour…
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • New article - 'The great meeting place: Bradford's city park and inclusive urban space'

    21 Aug 2014 | 2:28 am
    Ala Sirriyeh (Keele Sociology) and her colleagues Nathan Manning (University of York) and Anna Barker (University of Bradford) have had an article published in the August edition of the online journal Discover Society. The article looks at the City Park development in Bradford and considers how this may be an example of a more inclusive model of urban regeneration. Ala has spoken to Bradford Community Radio about this project and her work was featured in a local newspaper.The full research report from the study (published in June 2014) is available to download here.
  • The Guardians of the Galaxy meet D. W. Winnicott in Outer and Inner Space

    15 Aug 2014 | 12:52 pm
    Mark FeatherstoneI recently saw the new Marvel film The Guardians of the Galaxy at the cinema with my son who has become a Marvel fanatic over the course of the last couple of years. Indeed, Marvel comic books and comic characters have become our mutual obsession, taking me back to my own childhood when I lived in a world populated by ‘Spiderman’, ‘Daredevil’, ‘Doctor Doom’, and ‘Galactus’. Many of the characters he encounters, however, are new to me and his interest has opened up new worlds for us to explore together. Hence we watched The Guardians of Galaxy who we had…
  • UPDATED: Keele Student of the Year - Nicola Edwards

    10 Jul 2014 | 6:29 am
    We are delighted that Nicola Edwards, a Criminology and Sociology student has received the Neil and Gina Smith Student of the Year award.  This award was established in 2006 and four of the winners have been students in Criminology or Sociology.     Nicola's achievements are described in more detail here and below:"From an exceptionally strong pool of candidates, the awarding panel decided that Nicola Edwards should be the recipient of the 2014 Neil and Gina Smith Student of the Year  Award.  "Nicola graduates from Keele in 2014 with a First Class Honours Degree in…
  • A Prize Winner in Criminology - the 2014 Centre for Crime and Justice Studies Essay Competition

    26 Jun 2014 | 2:33 am
    Andrew Henley, a Graduate Teaching Assistant and PhD student in Criminology, is the winner of the 2014 Centre for Crime and Justice Studies essay competition. As their website reports, "Entrants to this year's competition were asked to write an essay of between 1,400 and 1,600 words on what criminal justice institution, or what aspect of policy or practice, they would want to see abolished. Andrew's essay, entitled 'Abolishing the stigma of punishments served', argued for the abolition of the routine requirement to declare criminal convictions.His essay concluded by arguing in favour of a…
  • Conference papers at 'The right to the city in an era of austerity', Paris

    12 Jun 2014 | 7:27 am
    Dr Ala Sirriyehand Dr Andrzej Zieleniec, (Sociology) recently gave papers at a conference at the Université Paris Ouest Nanterre/Université Paris-Sorbonne, ‘The right to the city in an era of austerity’. The abstracts for the papers are below.  A recent blog post about Andy’s work can be found hereand the final report that Ala’s co-authored paper was based on is here.  ‘The Great Meeting Place’: Bradford’s City Park, doing regeneration differently?Dr Nathan Manning (University of York) and Dr Ala Sirriyeh (Keele University)Recent accounts of urban space frequently…
 
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    scatterplot

  • against active learning

    andrewperrin
    21 Aug 2014 | 11:10 am
    I’m against active learning. Well, maybe not against it. Would you settle for “less for it than others are?” Here’s why. I gave a great lecture yesterday for the first day of class in Sociology 101 (Intro Sociology). Well, I thought it was great, and my reading of the students’ faces was that they were following along with me, laughing at the right points, even engaging in a little call-and-response when appropriate. It’s a lecture I’ve honed over many times teaching the class. It introduces the scope of the course, the idea of sociology as a science,…
  • sociologists statement on Ferguson

    Dan Hirschman
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:32 pm
    Last week, a group of 10 sociologists gathered at ASA to discuss the terrible situation in Ferguson.* Following that meeting, the group wrote up draft text for a statement. Here’s how they diagnose some of the larger problems: Law enforcement’s hyper-surveillance of black and brown youth has created a climate of suspicion of people of color among police departments and within communities. The disrespect and targeting of black men and women by police departments across the nation creates an antagonistic relationship that undermines community trust and inhibits effective policing.
  • clutch

    jeremy
    19 Aug 2014 | 2:39 pm
    Posted here for posterity: my first appearance in a Vine video (thanks to @kimberlybrogers). The backstory is that, as Social Psychology section chair, I was supposed to keep and pass on our section’s gavel, but because I was coming to the meetings directly from Australia, I wasn’t able to bring the gavel with me. So right before our business meeting I had to rush to a store and find something gavel-ish that I could improvise. As a fellow blogger on our masthead can confirm, the trick shown may be simple, but nevertheless I tried it roughly 20 times as we were chatting before the…
  • productivity, sexism, or a less sexy explanation.

    jessica
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:27 pm
    I apparently attended the same session at the ASA conference as Scott Jaschik yesterday, one on Gender and Work in the Academy. He must have been the guy with press badge who couldn’t wait to fact-check his notes during the Q&A. The first presenter, Kate Weisshaar from Stanford University, started the session off with a bang with her presentation looking at the glass ceiling in academia, asking whether it was productivity that explained women’s under-representation among the ranks of the tenured (or attrition to lower-ranked programs or out of academia all together). A summary…
  • northwestern is hiring!

    jeremy
    14 Aug 2014 | 12:33 pm
    We are hiring for two positions. One of them is an open position, for which I presume there is little extra need to get the word out. But we are also hiring a new “Assistant Professor of Instruction,” which is a job title that did not exist when I started my sabbatical (although the basic type of position has existed under the heading of “Continuing Lecture Faculty”). That position got some attention last year in a study indicating that instructors in this position performed as well in the classroom (in the metric of the study) as tenure-line faculty. I’ll paste…
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    potlatch

  • in praise of family existentialism

    Will
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    When it comes to the cultural injunctions of the Guardian and Radio 4, I'm pretty obedient. In the past couple of weeks, I've seen Richard Linklater's film Boyhood and ploughed through most of the second volume of Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle. The parallels are very striking, as many have noticed. On a superficial level, they include an attention to minor, arguably banal details of everyday life; a preoccupation with family and the parent-child relationship; a length that runs the risk of boredom; an absence of plot, conventionally understood; and above all, a heroic…
  • Listen to Big Ideas - what is neoliberalism?

    Will
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:31 am
    The Big Ideas event I spoke at on 'What is neoliberalism?' on Tuesday night turned out to be great fun, with unusually good questions and contributions from the audience. In case anybody would like to listen, here is a recording. It includes my talk, which lasts just over half an hour, and then an hour-long discussion.
  • Big Ideas discussion - What is Neoliberalism? - 29th July

    Will
    1 Jul 2014 | 2:06 am
    I'll be speaking at the next Big Ideas event, at the Wheatsheaf pub, 25 Rathbone Place, London, at 8pm on Tuesday 29th July. These events are organised by Andrew McGettigan, and take place on the last Tuesday of every month, for anyone who wants to turn up and discuss ideas. I'll be speaking on the topic 'What is neoliberalism?', and the blurb is here: It is often argued that, starting with the Reagan and Thatcher governments in the 1980s, economic policy-making around the world has become dominated by ‘neoliberalism’. This tends to imply something about free markets, but…
  • 'Trials and Tribulations in Economics' - seminar, 26th September

    Will
    26 Jun 2014 | 5:53 am
    As mentioned here before, I am one of the Co-Investigators on an ESRC Seminar Series, 'Spaces of Evidence', which explores various types of evidence (such as Randomised Controlled Trials) which are at work in policy, management and elite decision-making today. I'm convening the next seminar at Goldsmiths, London, on the 26th September, which will explore new directions in economic policy evidence, including RCTs and big data. We have quite a nice mix of speakers, including some who will look sceptically at this new empiricist turn, others who are actually practicing it, plus Angus…
  • against quality

    Will
    23 Jun 2014 | 1:57 pm
    If you'll excuse the Krapp's Last Blogpost splintered chronicity, I wrote a blogpost just before Christmas, which I then opted not to publish, on grounds that it was even too pretentiously curmudgeonly for me. 'How the hell can that be?', you ask. I guess I felt it was just a little too sneering at the simple pleasures of life, or maybe a little too moralistic. But then I read Kate Crawford's excellent essay, The Anxieties of Big Data, and wondered if I'd actually had an inadvertent whiff of the zeitgeist after all. As she articulates it there: the rapid rise of the…
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    orgtheory.net

  • what do 1st-year grad students need to know?

    epopp
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:35 pm
    I’m back from ASA and engaging in a little just-in-time production of syllabi. (For anyone who’s wondering, I did take notes on the “future of orgs” panel and will write those up, but want to run them by the presenters before I post them.) As grad director, I get to run the proseminar for first-year graduate students. Ours is one hour a week, both semesters. In the past, about half of it has been faculty introducing students to their research areas — e.g. urban week, work & orgs week, demography week, etc. But grad students have expressed dissatisfaction with…
  • durkheim viva voce

    Kieran
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:15 am
    I just attended the American Sociological Association Meetings in San Francisco, and while there my friend Marion Fourcade told me about a remarkable little piece of sociological history. It’s an audio recording of Émile Durkheim delivering a talk. Emile Durkheim recorded in 1911 in Bologna. I had no idea such a thing existed. The recording is about two and a half minutes long. It’s a fragment of a piece titled Jugements de valeur et jugements de réalité, which you can read in French here. It was recorded in 1911 at a meeting in Bologna, which I think is one of only quite few…
  • does organizational sociology have a future? the answer at 10:30 tomorrow

    epopp
    16 Aug 2014 | 9:56 pm
    Ah, ASA. So full of sociologists. What more can one say. But, for those of you who are here in San Francisco, here’s one last plug for tomorrow’s OOW session, “Does Organizational Sociology Have a Future?” Featuring Howard Aldrich, Lis Clemens, Harland Prechel, Martin Ruef, and Ezra Zuckerman. Plus I hear a rumor Dick Scott and Chick Perrow will be in the audience, heckling. It’s at 10:30am, and — important detail — it’s at the Parc 55, not the Hilton. I almost missed the business meeting tonight because I was in the wrong hotel. Anyway, the…
  • an ASA bingo retrospective

    Kieran
    13 Aug 2014 | 4:10 am
    ASA Conference Bingo is on a permanent vacation pending its return around 2030 in a nostalgic comeback that warms the hearts of fans old and new. But as several people have asked me about it, here is a collection of the cards from years past. Not available in stores. 2008 Back in 2008, the groundbreaking first ASA Conference Bingo was so new and radical, it required instructions to play. Only 100 people saw this Bingo, but every one of them formed a benign gambling addiction. 2009 The difficult Second Bingo was presented with no such concessions but subtly higher production values. 2009 Bingo…
  • more evidence for the libertarian chic hypothesis

    fabiorojas
    12 Aug 2014 | 5:01 pm
    I recently suggested that conservatives like to associate themselves with the libertarians because it looks cool, even if these groups believe very different things. There is more evidence that the conservative/libertarian fit is bad. From an article about a survey done by the Public Religion Research institute: Sixty-one percent of libertarians do not identify themselves as part of the Tea Party, the survey showed. About 7 percent of the adult population is consistently libertarian and that includes 12 percent of those who describe themselves as Republicans. “There’s largely…
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Cops vs. Man With Knife

    21 Aug 2014 | 2:00 pm
    August 21, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonDespite the cellphone video of two police officers killing Kajieme Powell, there is some dispute as to what happened.  (See this account in The Atlantic.) Was Powell threatening them; did he hold the knife high; was he only three or four feet away? The video is all over the Internet, including the Atlantic link above. I’m not going to include it here.  The officers get out of the car, immediately draw their guns, and walk towards Powell. Is this the best way to deal with a disturbed or possibly deranged individual – to confront him and then…
  • Frederick Douglass’s Agitation

    14 Aug 2014 | 5:12 am
    August 14, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonI hate to see a good word fade and get folded into another word that doesn’t mean quite the same thing.A Twitter link yesterday took me to a sociology blog whose post consisted entirely of a quotation from Frederick Douglass.  It contained this sentence:Those who profess to favor freedom and yet depreciate agitation are men who want crops without plowing up the ground; they want rain without thunder and lightning. Depreciate agitation? Surely Douglass must have said “deprecate.” That little “i,” a slender stroke and dot barely noticeable,…
  • The Last Time I Saw Betty Joan Perske

    13 Aug 2014 | 7:20 am
    August 13, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonOne late autumn day about five years ago, I had come out of Central Park and was walking east on W. 72nd St.  Dusk on a weekday. The entrance to the Dakota was free of tourists. Nobody leaning forward to peer in through the vertical bars to see the spot where John Lennon died – just the silent doorman in his gray coat. I walked on.  An old lady,  bent over and walking slowly, almost painfully, with her tiny dog, was coming towards me. Her face  looked so familiar, but I couldn’t place her.  Who was she? Where had I seen…
  • LOL

    11 Aug 2014 | 1:59 pm
    August 11, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonIt’s not “laughing out loud” any more. Or not just “laughing out loud.” The meaning has seeped out of that narrow box and is now broader and thinner, a generic sign of connection.*“Lol creates a comfort zone by calling attention to sentiments held in common.”  (John McWhorter in the New York Times.)I have a  hunch that this LOL-as-connection is a not guy thing. I don’t know the research on texting and gender, but I would expect that it is mostly women who are dropping these LOLs into their texts.  Laughter itself – the…
  • Sports, Markets, and Ficitons

    9 Aug 2014 | 8:28 am
    August 9, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonOwners of money-making operations can make more money if they pay their workers less. But they paying less is possible only if others are not offering to pay more. This often requires that the business form a cartel – an agreement among owners not to compete. That way, they can all pay their workers less than market value.  As Adam Smith pointed out long ago, businesses don’t really want competition.  What’s interesting political conservatives who are not in business, despite their talk about freedom and capitalism and the free…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Durkheim viva voce

    19 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    I just attended the American Sociological Association Meetings in San Francisco, and while there my friend Marion Fourcade told me about a remarkable little piece of sociological history. It’s an audio recording of Émile Durkheim delivering a talk. Emile Durkheim recorded in 1911 in Bologna. I had no idea such a thing existed. The recording is about two and a half minutes long. It’s a fragment of a piece titled Jugements de valeur et jugements de réalité, which you can read in French here. It was recorded in 1911 at a meeting in Bologna, which I think is one of only quite few…
  • An ASA Bingo Retrospective

    12 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    ASA Conference Bingo is on a permanent vacation pending its return around 2030 in a nostalgic comeback that warms the hearts of fans old and new. But as several people have asked me about it, here is a collection of the cards from years past. Not available in stores. 2008 Back in 2008, the groundbreaking first ASA Conference Bingo was so new and radical, it required instructions to play. Only 100 people saw this Bingo, but every one of them formed a benign gambling addiction. 2009 The difficult Second Bingo was presented with no such concessions but subtly higher production values. 2009 Bingo…
  • We're Hiring

    11 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    My department is looking to fill a tenure-track Assistant Professor line this Fall. Area of Specialization is Race/Ethnicity. If you have access to the ASA Job Bank, you can read the ad here. If you don’t have access to the ASA Job Bank, you can read the ad right here: Job ID: 10444 Date Position is Available: Fall 2015 Listing Active: 8/12/2014 to 10/11/2014 Title: Assistant Professor Department: Department of Sociology Company: Duke University Job Position/Rank: Academic Positions; Assistant Professor Special Program and Areas of Faculty Expertise: Racial and Ethnic Relations Region:…
  • The Persistence of the Old Regime

    5 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    This afternoon I ended up reading this Vox story about an effort to rank US Universities and Colleges carried out in 1911 by a man named Kendric Charles Babcock. On Twitter, Robert Kelchen remarks that the report was “squashed by Taft” (an unpleasant fate), and he links to the report itself, which is terrific. Babcock divided schools into four Classes, beginning with Class I: The better sort of school. And descending all the way to Class IV: One hardly dares look at the transcripts. Babcock’s discussion of his methods is admirably brief (the snippet above hints at the one…
  • A Visualization Error

    4 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    My Annual Review piece with Jim Moody, Data Visualization in Sociology, was officially published just recently. Reaction to the article has been positive and hopefully people will find it useful. One theme of the article is that good use of visualization can help pick out unusual patterns in data and help researchers figure out errors or other anomalies in their data. So, life being what it is, naturally there’s a mistake in one of the figures. I didn’t spot it myself. I got a nice email from Thomas Wood at Ohio State’s Political Science department. He pointed out something…
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    chris uggen's weblog

  • Which Prisoners Get Visitors?

    5 Aug 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better -- both while they're incarcerated and after they're released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation. The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure below shows, prisoners who are younger, white or…
  • Real Gutter Stories

    9 Jul 2014 | 8:52 am
    It takes courage to tell a big audience of strangers how your picture somehow ended up next to the headline "Drug Bust Nets Large Haul: Police Find Cocaine, Methamphetamine, and Viagra." The excellent Life of the Law podcast team brought a series of such painfully honest and powerful stories to the stage this summer. These two are my favorites, from two outstanding young scholars and friends.
  • Elliot Rodger and Violence Against Women

    24 May 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Shock, frustration, and rage. That's our reaction to the hate-filled video record that Elliot Rodger left behind. The 22-year-old, believed to have killed 6 people in Santa Barbara last night, left behind a terrible internet trail.I cannot and will not speculate about the "mind of the killer" in such cases, but I can offer a little perspective on the nature and social context of these acts. This sometimes entails showing how mass shootings (or school shootings) remain quite rare, or that crime rates have plummeted in the past 20 years. I won't repeat those reassurances here,…
  • Barney Kessel on Record Store Day

    19 Apr 2014 | 3:56 pm
    Oh sure, it is much easier to get your music online. And it is much cheaper to obtain it via "sharing," to borrow the kids' charming euphemism, rather than "paying." But neither experience can match the unexpected delight of holding a treasured obscurity in a real record store. And if said obscurity remains in good condition, it can fill your home with a sound that warms and glows like an actual log on an actual fire. On this national record store day, I hunted for a romantic big-guitar Barney Kessel album to take the damp chill from the air. A fitting choice, it turns out, given Mr.
  • Buzzo on Chemicals and Creativity

    2 Mar 2014 | 12:39 pm
    A promising student recently told me that s/he found drugs and alcohol "necessary" to do really creative work. "That's bovine excrement," I explained (though a bit more emphatically and not exactly in those words). Elaborating, I suggested that any short-run benefits to such a strategy quickly morph into much larger long-run liabilities. Plus, there are far healthier ways to address the underlying problems that the chemicals purport to solve -- try running or blogging, for example, if you want to overcome inhibitions, anxiety, or writer's block. I'm not sure whether my li'l lecture got…
 
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    European Sociological Review

  • Who Feels Inferior? A Test of the Status Anxiety Hypothesis of Social Inequalities in Health

    Layte, R., Whelan, C. T.
    6 Aug 2014 | 9:32 pm
    The empirical association between income inequality, population health, and other social problems is now well established, and the research literature suggests that the relationship is not artefactual. Debate is still ongoing as to the cause of this association. Wilkinson, Marmot, and colleagues have argued for some time that the relationship stems from the psycho-social effects of status comparisons. Here, income inequality is a marker of a wider status hierarchy that provokes an emotional stress response in individuals that is harmful to health and well-being. We label this the…
  • Double Standards: Differences in Norms on Voluntary Childlessness for Men and Women

    Rijken, A. J., Merz, E.-M.
    6 Aug 2014 | 9:32 pm
    We examined double standards in norms concerning voluntary childlessness. Whether the choice to remain childless is more accepted for men or women is not a priori clear; we formulated hypotheses in both directions. Parenthood might be considered as more central to women’s identity than to men’s, resulting in higher disapproval of childlessness for women. Yet, as the costs of parenthood are higher for women, people might also be more accepting of their choice to remain childless and disapprove more of childless men. Multilevel analyses were conducted, including individual and…
  • European Sociological Review - Editorial

    6 Aug 2014 | 9:32 pm
  • Non-resident Father-Child Contact across Divorce Cohorts: The Role of Father Involvement during Marriage

    Westphal, S. K., Poortman, A.-R., van der Lippe, T.
    6 Aug 2014 | 9:32 pm
    Using retrospective data from the Divorce in the Netherlands Survey 1998 (SIN98, N = 808), we investigate changes in children’s daytime contact and overnight stays with non-resident fathers across four divorce cohorts from 1949 to 1998. Our findings show that daytime contact and overnight stays increased over time. A modest part of this increase can be explained by a rise in fathers’ child-rearing involvement during marriage. Involved fathers are more likely to remain in contact with their children after divorce, and fathers have become more involved in child rearing over time.
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    6 Aug 2014 | 9:32 pm
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    Work, Employment & Society current issue

  • 'Make do and mend' after redundancy at Anglesey Aluminium: critiquing human capital approaches to unemployment

    Dobbins, T., Plows, A., Lloyd-Williams, H.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:37 am
    This article tracks workers’ responses to redundancy and impact on the local labour market and regional unemployment policy after the closure of a large employer, Anglesey Aluminium (AA), on Anglesey in North Wales. It questions human capital theory (HCT) and its influence on sustaining neo-liberal policy orthodoxy – focused on supplying skilled and employable workers in isolation from other necessary ingredients in the policy recipe. It is concluded that HCT and associated skills policy orthodoxy are problematic because supply of particular skills did not create demand from…
  • Book review: Reza Hasmath, The Ethnic Penalty: Immigration, Education and the Labour Market

    Naseem, J.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:37 am
  • Training for the unemployed: differential effects in white- and blue-collar workers with respect to mental well-being

    Saloniemi, A., Romppainen, K., Strandh, M., Virtanen, P.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:37 am
    In this study we investigate the effects of active labour market policy measures on health and well-being and how these effects are connected with socioeconomic status. The data were collected among the participants (n = 212) in 24 conventional vocational training courses in Finland. According to the results, training was accompanied by improvements in health and well-being among participants with a higher socioeconomic status, whereas for blue-collar workers the changes were neutral or even detrimental. The results raise questions about the role of active labour market policy measures as a…
  • Trade union struggles

    Cake, S.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:37 am
  • A social net? Internet and social media use during unemployment

    Feuls, M., Fieseler, C., Suphan, A.
    6 Aug 2014 | 4:37 am
    Many people who are unemployed tend to experience forms of psychological and social losses, including a weakened time structure, diminished social contacts, an absence of collective purpose, falling status, and inactivity. This article focuses on the experience of diminished social contacts and addresses whether social media help the unemployed maintain their relationships. Based on qualitative interviews with unemployed individuals, the article identifies various types of social support networks and their impact on individual experiences of inclusion and exclusion. Although the unemployed…
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Looking at Slum Clearance in the Southwest

    gkramer
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:17 am
    In this blog entry, Robert Fairbanks, author of The War on Slums in the Southwest, writes about how religious leaders campaigned for slum clearance in San Antonio and Phoenix. The War on Slums in the Southwest traces the history of slum clearance and public housing in the Southwest and reminds us of the important role religious leaders had in the campaign to eliminate slums in the Southwest. In two cities, San Antonio and Phoenix, Roman Catholic priests were the major actors in securing public housing for their cities. Father Carmelo Tranchese served as priest at Our Lady of Guadalupe on the…
  • North Korea Ecology

    tabathist
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:17 am
    Inside North Korea’s Environmental Collapse by Phil McKenna I saw this interesting piece the other day about environmental concern within North Korea along along with startling photographs so i thought id share it here. ‘North Korea has been hiding something. Something beyond its prison camps, its nuclear facilities, its pervasive poverty, its aching famine, its lack of energy—electrical, fossil, or otherwise. What the hermit kingdom has been covering up is perhaps more fundamental than all of those: an environmental collapse so severe it could destabilize the entire country.
  • Damned treadmill distractions

    Old Jules
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:11 am
    Hi readers.  I was on the treadmill down at the Olathe Community Center around 0530 this morning, walking to New Orleans, Fats Domino style when some guy in an orange jump suite completed the preliminaries to get his head chopped off.  Fairly unexpected thing on my end.  He explained his loss was a consequence of the US foreign policy in the Middle East. But the guy in the black Ninja-like garb might have coerced him to say that.  Might have told him there were other body parts could be cut off in advance if it weren’t properly explained for viewers.  Afterward he offered up…
  • Have a big wedding? You're more likely to be in a happy marriage

    Zach Wener-Fligner
    20 Aug 2014 | 8:41 am
    Couples that tie the knot with a big wedding have a better chance of finding marital bliss down the road, according to a new report from the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia. Beginning in 2007 and 2008, researchers followed 1,000 Americans ages 18 to 34 who were in a relationship but not married.  The researchers then analyzed the quality of the 418 marriages that occurred over the next five years. The results? Couples with large weddings—defined as having 150 guests or more—experienced happy marriages 47% of the time. Couples whose weddings had fewer than 50…
  • Pill 64 | Waiting for Love..?

    Guy Garanzo
    20 Aug 2014 | 7:22 am
    Apparently, having a romantic partner is such a fad nowadays, now that I thought about it. Well, maybe I’m a little too extra-terrestrial but I can’t understand certain needs and the rationale behind desperate searches for girlfriends/boyfriends in college. Now, I’m only referring to those who seek partners and not the romance, and I’m perfectly fine with feelings of love that develop naturally. It has become so superficial, where everyone just wants to look for the physically ideal partner and not true love that develops naturally without interference. There’s…
 
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    Well Written Documents

  • A True Songwriter Pens Her Soul: How Adele has the Upper Hand

    Brianna Berry
    12 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Composition of a Songwriter Heartache is oftentimes the root of creativity, especially for a songwriter. Deep emotions provoke some of the most altruistic and open written lyrics that music has ever seen. It’s a given. From Michael Jackson to … Continue reading →
  • Motivational Writing: Michelle Obama Raps Up Child Obesity

    Hope Benefield
    5 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Healthy Motivation: “You’ve Got to Eat Right; You’ve Got to Work Hard” Michelle Obama is using motivational writing in a hip-hop album release to combat childhood obesity. The 19 track CD, “Songs for a Healthier America“, is part of the … Continue reading →
  • Since When Are You a Writer? Reality TV Stars Take to the Blog

    Brianna Berry
    29 Jul 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Blog is Now Available in Fabulous Red Carpet Style The blog is the new reality TV stars’ medium for drama.  Gone is the age when our reality TV stars could only embarrass themselves on the tube.  These days, many networks are … Continue reading →
  • Will Voice Recognition Software Replace Manual Transcription?

    Guest Author
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Transcription Versus Voice Recognition The advent of speech recognition (SR) software promises great prospects in the field of transcription. Many transcriptionists have adopted this technology, which allows them to give voice input and then software does all the typing. This … Continue reading →
  • Fictional Writer, Carrie Bradshaw, on The Pen Versus Love

    Charlene Rossell
    13 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Writing About Love is a Universal Effort Every great writer, fictional writer or a real-life professional writer, has tried his or her hand at writing about love at one point or another. It has become a topic that stands as an epic abstract … Continue reading →
 
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    jonathanrex.com

  • Paige Bradley

    J Rex
    18 Aug 2014 | 4:09 am
    “Born in Carmel, California Paige Bradley knew she would be an artist by the age of nine. Immersed in nature and art, Bradley’s fascination with the human figure began early. She believed that through the figure an artist could speak a universal language that is timeless and essential. Paige Bradley started drawing from the nude [&hellip
  • Body Sculpting

    J Rex
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:29 pm
    By the time I finished college I was 6’3 and 215lbs of disgusting. While in school I was eating practically everything in sight and drinking soda all day long. After graduating and moving to South Florida I realized I couldn’t hide my blubber under several layers of clothes and still look decent in the muggy [&hellip
  • Cultural Appropriation

    J Rex
    26 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    Is there a difference between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation? When a white man in Poland encounters Reggae music as a kid, dreads his hair and makes Polish Reggae is he stealing something? When black people grow out their afro and cut it into a Mohawk (commonly called a Frohawk) are they doing the same [&hellip
  • Die Antwoord

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:27 pm
    Die Antwoord is an Independent South African Rap-Rave group featuring lead vocalists Watkin Tudor Jones (Ninja) and Anri du Toit (Yolandi Visser) along with their DJ, Hi-Tek. Jones previously released albums with prior groups Max Normal and Constructus Corporation before teaming up with his personal assistant Anri and forming Die Antwoord in 2008. With the [&hellip
  • The Magus

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:14 pm
    It’s very rare that I pick up a work of fiction and read it from beginning to end in one sitting without any interruptions. The Magus by John Fowles was that rare exception. The paperback cover is what initially caught my eye (I’m pretty basic and any image of a fit nude woman gets my [&hellip
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