Sociology

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  • Who is a Low Wage Earner?

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer The mayor of Los Angeles has proposed increasing the minimum wage to $13.25 an hour in the city, and requested an analysis of the potential impact an increase would have on workers and businesses.  Researchers from UC Berkeley’s Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics produced a report and concluded that more than a half a million workers in the city would get a raise (those earning minimum wage and those earning below the proposed minimum wage). The report provides a demographic profile on these low-wage workers. They comprise 37 percent of those earning wages in…
  • Lack of A level maths leading to fewer female economists

    eScienceNews: Sociology
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:13 am
    A study by the University of Southampton has found there are far fewer women studying economics than men, with women accounting for just 27 per cent of economics students, despite them making up 57 per cent of the undergraduate population in UK universities. read more
  • A Sociology of the Seasons?

    Keele University: Sociology Staff
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    By Dr Andy ZieleniecAs a sociologist of culture or a cultural sociologist I am interested in the various ways in which we make and represent meaning to ourselves and to others. How we create and share and reflect on the present connected to the past and predicting, hoping and aspiring to some vision of the future. We do this within social contexts in which our material and physical environments also impact and influence our understanding of the social processes, forms and structures that affect our experiences of being in the world. An intrinsic part of this is how we interact with…
  • Understanding Violence Sociologically

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    14 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman Violence is ubiquitous. We see it in television shows, movies, video games, and advertisements; we read about it in news articles, magazines, and books; we speak about it—both literally when we recount what’s happening in the world, but more often figuratively with an array of violent phrases that pervade our everyday speech;  we fear it with our security systems, gun purchases, and police forces; and we experience it, directly or indirectly, in our homes, schools, communities, workplaces, playing fields, and battlefields. Source:…
  • Sociology, Sidewalks, and Walking

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    10 Oct 2014 | 12:23 pm
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales If a city’s streets look interesting, the city looks interesting; if they look dull, the city looks dull. (Jane Jacobs). Have you ever noticed that your walking pace changes depending on where you’re walking, and where you’re walking to? Have you noticed that walking involves an interaction with space as you’re moving through it? I love walking, I love walking quickly, and I love walking on sidewalks. Even though sidewalks lead to paths already known, they also provide an opportunity for one to really look at the surroundings, notice shifts within social life…
 
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • Sociologist to speak at UH about lack of women in STEM fields - The Daily Cougar

    30 Oct 2014 | 3:29 pm
    Sociologist to speak at UH about lack of women in STEM fieldsThe Daily CougarGlass is the Barbara Bush Professor of Liberal Arts in the Department of Sociology and Research Associate in the Population Research Center at the University of Texas – Austin. She received her bachelor's in social science from New College of Florida
  • Marking 100 years of sociology teaching and research in India - E-Pao.net

    29 Oct 2014 | 10:15 pm
    E-Pao.netMarking 100 years of sociology teaching and research in IndiaE-Pao.netSociology as an independent course for teaching and research has completed 100 years in India. As a subject that studies man and society, it was first introduced in 1914 at the Bombay University under a grant from the Government of India, though
  • Cultural sociologist Jeffrey Alexander will be Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar - UB News Center

    29 Oct 2014 | 1:43 pm
    Cultural sociologist Jeffrey Alexander will be Phi Beta Kappa Visiting ScholarUB News CenterHis residency is sponsored by the UB Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron of New York and supported by the UB Humanities Institute, UB Department of Sociology, UB Institute for Jewish Thought and Heritage, UB Honors College and the UB Academies.
  • Letter from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology - Amherststudent

    28 Oct 2014 | 8:47 pm
    Letter from the Department of Anthropology and SociologyAmherststudentAlong with our colleagues in Black Studies, we in the Anthropology and Sociology Department wish to express our strong support for #BlackLivesMatter. The thoughtfulness, courage, and shared commitment to issues of racial justice that resulted in the
  • Letters: AH Halsey's view of sociology was always a broad one - The Guardian

    24 Oct 2014 | 11:54 am
    The GuardianLetters: AH Halsey's view of sociology was always a broad oneThe GuardianThe Oxford department that AH Halsey headed at Barnett House for 28 years trained graduate social work and probation students. His role as an activist ran through what it did: his view of sociology was always a broad one, encompassing social and ...
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    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results

  • USC to host event on 'Denial of State Violence'

    30 Oct 2014 | 10:11 pm
    Dr. Göçek analyzed the impact of processes such as development, nationalism, religious movements and collective violence on minorities.
  • Should girls be 'pink princesses'?

    30 Oct 2014 | 8:11 pm
    So your daughter will just die if she doesn't wear a princess costume for Halloween? And of course it has to be pink. And every little girl you know wants to be a princess for Halloween, except for the neighborhood tomboy down the street?
  • Sociologist to speak at UH about lack of women in STEM fields

    30 Oct 2014 | 3:28 pm
    Recent findings show that many women are staying out of STEM careers. Jennifer Glass will analyze the entry and retention of women in STEM occupations from 6:30 to 8 p.m. today at the UC Theater. Glass is the Barbara Bush Professor of Liberal Arts in the Department of Sociology and Research Associate in the Population Research [&hellip -- " Sociologist to speak at UH about lack of women in STEM ...
  • Candlelight vigil held at Ohio State for Ebola’s African victims

    30 Oct 2014 | 12:16 am
    Ohio State University student Edward Alpha recently received a text message between classes that his cousin in Sierra Leone was sick. “I thought it was ordinary sick, like malaria,” said Alpha, a senior majoring in public health and sociology who has lived in the United States for about five years. But he later learned it was much worse.
  • Concordia PhD student, once homeless, wins national dissertation award

    29 Oct 2014 | 4:19 am
    On Tuesday, the 53-year-old sociology professor received a national award for a PhD study on homelessness drawn in part from what he has called his own disaster.
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Weddings: Front Stage Performances

    W. W. Norton
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer Weddings are big productions. They often take months of planning that includes selecting decorations, invitations, food, music, dresses, tuxedoes, color schemes, seating charts, the wedding party and more. Weddings are a heightened example of what sociologist Erving Goffman called front stage behavior. Goffman viewed social life as something akin to a performance, where we attempt to manage the impressions we make to others. Weddings are clearly social performances: they involve guests, usually seated in the audience, and people involved in the wedding party play roles as…
  • Is Islamophobia a Form of Racism (And Does it Even Matter)?

    W. W. Norton
    27 Oct 2014 | 10:25 am
    By Saadia Faruqi Graduate student Department of Sociology, Baker University  A couple of weeks ago, Ben Affleck called out Bill Maher for being a racist because of his views of Muslims. In a world still healing from the racism of the pre-civil rights era, in a world of Ferguson and Michigan, being called a racist is no laughing matter. Sadly, we live in a society where more Americans sit up and take notice when a Hollywood actor makes a statement than when the president of the United States does. What is Islamophobia? Is it related to racism? How does Islamophobia relate to sociology?
  • Who is a Low Wage Earner?

    W. W. Norton
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer The mayor of Los Angeles has proposed increasing the minimum wage to $13.25 an hour in the city, and requested an analysis of the potential impact an increase would have on workers and businesses.  Researchers from UC Berkeley’s Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics produced a report and concluded that more than a half a million workers in the city would get a raise (those earning minimum wage and those earning below the proposed minimum wage). The report provides a demographic profile on these low-wage workers. They comprise 37 percent of those earning wages in…
  • Understanding Violence Sociologically

    W. W. Norton
    14 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman Violence is ubiquitous. We see it in television shows, movies, video games, and advertisements; we read about it in news articles, magazines, and books; we speak about it—both literally when we recount what’s happening in the world, but more often figuratively with an array of violent phrases that pervade our everyday speech;  we fear it with our security systems, gun purchases, and police forces; and we experience it, directly or indirectly, in our homes, schools, communities, workplaces, playing fields, and battlefields. Source:…
  • Sociology, Sidewalks, and Walking

    W. W. Norton
    10 Oct 2014 | 12:23 pm
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales If a city’s streets look interesting, the city looks interesting; if they look dull, the city looks dull. (Jane Jacobs). Have you ever noticed that your walking pace changes depending on where you’re walking, and where you’re walking to? Have you noticed that walking involves an interaction with space as you’re moving through it? I love walking, I love walking quickly, and I love walking on sidewalks. Even though sidewalks lead to paths already known, they also provide an opportunity for one to really look at the surroundings, notice shifts within social life…
 
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • Project Update: Using Twitter in Sociology Teaching and Learning

    23 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    By Emma Head and Ala Sirriyeh We are now in the third week of our teaching innovation project.  We have asked students to complete a questionnaire detailing their use of social media and noting their perceptions of using social media in education.  Next week we will be running focus groups with students to discuss these topics in more detail.Ala has been making use to Twitter to alert students to news stories, journal articles, and other resources that are relevant to the 'Race', Racism, and Resistance module.  Seminar activities have also been documented in tweets.
  • A Sociology of the Seasons?

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    By Dr Andy ZieleniecAs a sociologist of culture or a cultural sociologist I am interested in the various ways in which we make and represent meaning to ourselves and to others. How we create and share and reflect on the present connected to the past and predicting, hoping and aspiring to some vision of the future. We do this within social contexts in which our material and physical environments also impact and influence our understanding of the social processes, forms and structures that affect our experiences of being in the world. An intrinsic part of this is how we interact with…
  • Stiegler’s University

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:21 am
    On Wednesday the first Sociology / Social Policy research seminar of the new academic year is scheduled. Mark Featherstone will talk about his recent work, 'Stiegler's University':Wednesday, 22nd October12pm-1pmCBC0.005AbstractIn this paper I read Stiegler’s work on youth, and especially his discussion of attention from Taking Care of Youth and the Generations, and the decadent society, formulated across three volumes of Disbelief and Discredit, through the lens of the contemporary university in order to develop a theory of the potentially utopian and dystopian conditions of higher…
  • Using Twitter in Sociology Teaching and Learning – Research Project Launch!

    9 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Today sees the launch of a new research project titled ‘Using Twitter in Sociology Teaching and Learning'. The project is being led by Dr Emma Head and Dr Ala Sirriyeh, and is funded by Keele's Teaching Innovation Project Scheme. The objectives of this investigation are to firstly assess the use of Twitter as a tool to promote enhanced student learning and engagement on a sociology module and, secondly, to explore the role of social media in the education and wider lives of undergraduate students.  The research will evaluate the use of Twitter as a teaching and learning tool in a…
  • The Big Sociology Project: Welcome Week 2014 at Keele

    3 Oct 2014 | 2:03 am
    By Dr Ala Sirriyeh, Lecturer in Sociology  It has been a great pleasure this week to welcome the wonderful new first year Sociology students to Keele. As part of the Welcome Week activities, on Thursday we ran a workshop titled ‘The Big Sociology Project’. This workshop was in the style of a 'treasure hunt' and was essentially aimed at getting students involved in the practice of ‘being sociological’. The project introduced them to thinking about what sociology is and also about how you ‘do’ sociology by conducting a mini sociological study of Keele and the surrounding area.
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  • another step forward for open science

    jeremy
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:31 am
    The esteemed journal Nature has issued new guidelines about code availability. Includes: Nature and the Nature journals have decided that, given the diversity of practices in the disciplines we cover, we cannot insist on sharing computer code in all cases. But we can go further than we have in the past, by at least indicating when code is available. Accordingly, our policy now mandates that when code is central to reaching a paper’s conclusions, we require a statement describing whether that code is available and setting out any restrictions on accessibility. Editors will insist on…
  • geeks at war!

    jeremy
    27 Oct 2014 | 9:53 am
    Yesterday Eszter got me started playing Ingress, which to paraphrase this good introduction, is sort of like Foursquare meets geocaching meets a sci-fi version of the Cold War.  The map above shows the current battle between the two teams: the Resistance (blue) vs. the Enlightened (green).  Also, as you can see, the places where war is afoot versus those where it is not also provides a good proxy for global digital inequality. (If you do check it out, might I suggest Team Green?  Sure, “resistance” might sound more plucky, but it’s really all about keeping the world the…
  • ello is now a public benefit corporation

    Dan Hirschman
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:36 am
    As part of our continuing discussion over the ethics of Facebook’s emotional manipulation study, Philip Cohen advanced the idea that we should simply declare FB a public utility and regulate it as such: But Facebook is too big, and they own irreplaceable archives of hundreds of millions of people’s stuff. I figure just nationalize it or regulate it as a public utility – call it critical infrastructure. Then let private companies out-innovate boring Facebook.gov if they want to and win people away. This notion struck me as a bit extreme, but provocative in just the right way. What…
  • badges

    jeremy
    19 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Don’t these badges look nifty? You can display them girl-scout style at the top of your article if it fulfills various open science practices. Should quant sociology have something like this? (Nothing against my qual-pals, just harder to see how it would work.)
  • asa renewal – now with social media

    tina
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:21 pm
    Look! When you renew your ASA membership, there are now fields for you to enter your Twitter, handle, blog address, or other social media info. This is something that we requested on the Task Force on Social Media (now the Task Force on Engaging Sociology) that was begun by President Annette Lareau last year to improve the ASA’s engagement with social media. If you input your Twitter handle here, for example, the ASA can include the info on our nametags at the conference, create a list of sociologists’ blogs, etc. It is all optional, of course.
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    potlatch

  • against the neo-behaviorists

    Will
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:31 am
    The LSE Impact Blog have been hosting a debate on the future of the social sciences, in anticipation of this event tomorrow evening, with Nicholas Christakis, whose article on the need to 'shake up' the social sciences made a bit of a stir last year. A more recent article by Amanda Goodall and Andrew Oswald lept enthusiastically aboard Christakis's bandwagon, from a British context. The tenor of this debate irks me. It employs the rhetoric of 'modernity' and 'anti-conservatism' in a similar way to Tony Blair, namely, to back all critics into corners where they do…
  • The Limits of Neoliberalism discussions

    Will
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    As part of the slow-burning promotion of my book, a couple of discussions have been published in recent weeks, exploring the book's arguments. Firstly, New Left Project published a two-part interview I did with Tom Mills, one of their editors. These can be read here [pt 1] and here [pt 2]. Secondly, Renewal organised a symposium of critical reviews of the book, with a response from me. I was really delighted with the quality of these commentaries from Bob Jessop, Stephanie Mudge and Jonathan Derbyshire. You can download the pdf of this symposium here. 
  • in praise of family existentialism

    Will
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    When it comes to the cultural injunctions of the Guardian and Radio 4, I'm pretty obedient. In the past couple of weeks, I've seen Richard Linklater's film Boyhood and ploughed through most of the second volume of Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle. The parallels are very striking, as many have noticed. On a superficial level, they include an attention to minor, arguably banal details of everyday life; a preoccupation with family and the parent-child relationship; a length that runs the risk of boredom; an absence of plot, conventionally understood; and above all, a heroic…
  • Listen to Big Ideas - what is neoliberalism?

    Will
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:31 am
    The Big Ideas event I spoke at on 'What is neoliberalism?' on Tuesday night turned out to be great fun, with unusually good questions and contributions from the audience. In case anybody would like to listen, here is a recording. It includes my talk, which lasts just over half an hour, and then an hour-long discussion.
  • Big Ideas discussion - What is Neoliberalism? - 29th July

    Will
    1 Jul 2014 | 2:06 am
    I'll be speaking at the next Big Ideas event, at the Wheatsheaf pub, 25 Rathbone Place, London, at 8pm on Tuesday 29th July. These events are organised by Andrew McGettigan, and take place on the last Tuesday of every month, for anyone who wants to turn up and discuss ideas. I'll be speaking on the topic 'What is neoliberalism?', and the blurb is here: It is often argued that, starting with the Reagan and Thatcher governments in the 1980s, economic policy-making around the world has become dominated by ‘neoliberalism’. This tends to imply something about free markets, but…
 
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    orgtheory.net

  • medieval combat

    fabiorojas
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:03 pm
    From Laughing Squid. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power 
  • “work in progress” forum on organizational sociology

    epopp
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:19 pm
    Work in Progress, the blog of ASA’s organizations, occupations, and work section, just launched a new series on the future of organizational sociology. It launched today with a introduction from Liz Gorman and a first post by Howard Aldrich. Liz has an impressive slate of sociologists lined up — in the days to come, you can expect to hear from: Martin Ruef (Duke) Harland Prechel (Texas A&M) Elisabeth Clemens (University of Chicago) Ezra Zuckerman (MIT Sloan) Gerald F. Davis (University of Michigan) Heather Haveman (UC-Berkeley) Brayden King (Northwestern) Charles Perrow…
  • letters of recommendation: still garbage

    fabiorojas
    28 Oct 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Long time readers know that I am a skeptic when it comes to letters of recommendation. The last time I wrote about the topic, I relied on a well cited 1993 article by Aamodt, Bryan amd Whitcomb in Public Personnel Management that reviews the literature and shows that LoR’s have very little validity. I.e., they are poor predictors of future job performance. But what if the literature has changed in the meanwhile? Maybe these earlier studies were flawed, or based on limited samples, or better research methods provide more compelling answers. So I went back and read some more recent…
  • dear steven fazzari

    fabiorojas
    27 Oct 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Hi, Steve, Fabio here. I recently read about how you are now the chair of the new sociology department at Washington University, St. Louis. It seems that you are getting advice from some excellent sociologists. Still, I wanted to offer a suggestion about how to build your program that I think has some merit  but that may not be obvious. Here it is: build a program that, roughly speaking, is about 2/3 quantitative and 1/3 qualitative. However, don’t use the traditional criteria for “quantitative research,” which means anyone who does regression analysis or, as in economics,…
  • congratulations to judson everitt

    fabiorojas
    26 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    Business Insider named Judson Everitt of Loyola one of the best 25 professors in America. A hearty congratulations to an IU alumni and top notch educator. Here’s his profile at Loyola. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Whose Bad Guess is More Bad? Difficult Comparisons

    29 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    October 29, 2014Jay LivingstonHow to compare percentages that are very different?  A recent Guardian/Ipsos poll asked people in fourteen wealthy nations to estimate certain demographics. What percent of the population of your country are immigrants? Muslim? Christian? People overestimated the number of immigrants and Muslims, and underestimated the number of Christians. But the size of the error varied.  Here is the chart on immigration that the Guardian published (here).Italy, the US, Belgium, and France are way off. The average guess was 18-23 percentage points higher than the…
  • Shootings and Elephants

    25 Oct 2014 | 2:39 pm
    October 25, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWhy would an apparently happy kid shoot several classmates? That seems to be the question that’s getting the attention of the press and perhaps the public. “Struggling to Find Motive,” said one typical headline. That’s the way we think about school shootings these days. It’s unlikely that any of the motives that turn up will be all that strange. Fryberg may have been upset by a racial comment someone had made the day before or by a break-up with a girl. He may have had other conflicts with other kids. Nothing unusual there.But “why” is not…
  • Risk Managers Are Worried About Inequality

    23 Oct 2014 | 11:02 am
    October 23, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWho’s worrying about inequality? It’s not just the scraggly bunch that occupied Zucotti Park, and not just the lefty economists and sociologists hefting a copy of Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Professional Risk Managers’ International Association surveyed risk managers, and they too are uneasy about inequality.The majority (62%) said that inequality poses a risk to the economy. Only 14% were like “What, me worry?”I’m not sure what risk managers do, but I’m guessing  the profession does not draw many  socialists to its…
  • Et in Arcadia Inflation*

    22 Oct 2014 | 8:37 am
    October 22, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWhat do you do when your published predictions prove wrong? How do you resolve the dissonance between your ideas and the facts? In a blogpost earlier this month (here), I looked at the responses of twenty-three economists who had written an open letter to Ben Bernanke warning of inflation unless he ended quantitative easing and tightened the Fed’s monetary policies. Bernanke ignored the warning, and inflation didn’t happen. I made the analogy between their responses and those of the religious millenerian cult described in When Prophecy Fails. When…
  • Hazing and Sexual Assault

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:55 am
    October 21, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonRandom thoughts on the Sayreville hazing. (If you are not familiar with this case, see yesterday’s Times article here.)1.  At least nobody is accusing the freshmen footballers of bring the assaults on themselves by dressing provocatively – those tight, shiny spandex-like pants, their torsos sometimes bare in the locker room. Nor is anyone saying, “if you don’t want seniors shoving their fingers up your butt, avoid being on the football team” the way women are told that if they don’t want to be raped, they shouldn’t drink too much at…
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    chris uggen's weblog

  • Why Sex Offenders are Running for Office

    17 Oct 2014 | 11:40 am
    Locked Out (creative commons image by Jared Rodriguez)The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports that a group of "sex offenders" are registering to vote and plan to run for elected office. I put "sex offenders" in quotations because these voters and office-seekers are not currently under supervision for any crime. Instead, they are "civilly committed," which means that they have either already completed their criminal sentences or, as is the case for over 50 clients, they were never charged as an adult for a sex offense. Although they are euphemistically called "clients" rather than…
  • Which Prisoners Get Visitors?

    5 Aug 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better -- both while they're incarcerated and after they're released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation. The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure below shows, prisoners who are younger, white or…
  • Real Gutter Stories

    9 Jul 2014 | 8:52 am
    It takes courage to tell a big audience of strangers how your picture somehow ended up next to the headline "Drug Bust Nets Large Haul: Police Find Cocaine, Methamphetamine, and Viagra." The excellent Life of the Law podcast team brought a series of such painfully honest and powerful stories to the stage this summer. These two are my favorites, from two outstanding young scholars and friends.
  • Elliot Rodger and Violence Against Women

    24 May 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Shock, frustration, and rage. That's our reaction to the hate-filled video record that Elliot Rodger left behind. The 22-year-old, believed to have killed 6 people in Santa Barbara last night, left behind a terrible internet trail.I cannot and will not speculate about the "mind of the killer" in such cases, but I can offer a little perspective on the nature and social context of these acts. This sometimes entails showing how mass shootings (or school shootings) remain quite rare, or that crime rates have plummeted in the past 20 years. I won't repeat those reassurances here,…
  • Barney Kessel on Record Store Day

    19 Apr 2014 | 3:56 pm
    Oh sure, it is much easier to get your music online. And it is much cheaper to obtain it via "sharing," to borrow the kids' charming euphemism, rather than "paying." But neither experience can match the unexpected delight of holding a treasured obscurity in a real record store. And if said obscurity remains in good condition, it can fill your home with a sound that warms and glows like an actual log on an actual fire. On this national record store day, I hunted for a romantic big-guitar Barney Kessel album to take the damp chill from the air. A fitting choice, it turns out, given Mr.
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Pumpkin Spice & Everything Nice

    Stephanie
    28 Oct 2014 | 4:12 pm
    It’s my favorite time of year…. Fall.  With the arms of the trees brimming and overflowing with fiery colors of Autumn, a breeze just firm enough to require a light jacket and cute boots, and hand warmth provided by a seasonably appropriate latte… Pumpkin Spice.  I grew up listening to stories and rhymes about little girls and fairy tales.  I grew up thinking that sugar and spice, and everything nice- that’s what little girls are made of.  Turns out, the rhymes didn’t have it quite right. Or maybe they were spot on in the olden-days, and it’s just…
  • Capitalism is a Pyramid Scheme

    suanqu
    28 Oct 2014 | 3:00 pm
    “One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we’ve been bamboozled long enough, we tend to rej
  • How I tried to change my personal mantra

    Ted Bauer
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:01 pm
    On Saturday, I was walking in Antwerp, Belgium in a fashion-forward area of the city. (If you want t
  • The Politics of Truth by C. Wright Mills

    Philo
    28 Oct 2014 | 1:41 pm
    I wouldn’t say I didn’t understand this book of C. Wright Mills essays. In the most straightforward sense of “understand,” I suppose I was able to grasp almost all the ideas, at least to some degree. However, I still feel like I didn’t get nearly as much out of it as I could have. For me it was kind of like hearing only part of a conversation. To really appreciate and fully comprehend serious writings like these, you want to have as much background in the relevant context as possible. So in this case that would be the major ideas and controversies in sociology, politics, academia,…
  • HBCUs Not Rushing to Embrace LGBTQA Issues of Staff and Students

    Veronica Lynne
    28 Oct 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Earlier this summer, a gay White professor at Alabama State University filed a lawsuit in federal court against Alabama State, an HBCU, alleging that he and his partner had been the targets of discriminatory practices at the school. Dr. John L. Garland charged that he and his spouse, Dr. Steven B. Chesbro, who is dean of the College of Health Sciences at ASU, were retaliated against after they spoke out about a pattern of discrimination at the public HBCU. While ASU declined to comment on the allegations, news of the lawsuit made national headlines, raising an urgent and pressing question:…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Cinema-like environment helps audiences immerse in movies even on small screens & displays

    30 Oct 2014 | 2:16 am
    If the surroundings are designed to be sufficiently stimulating, even a simple computer screen is enough to generate an intense cinematic experience. After observing some 300 study subjects, researchers at the Institute of Psychology of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany concluded that the angle of viewing does not play a vital role in the cinematic experience, thus disproving various hypotheses. According to the results of their study, the presence of so-called contextual visual cues plays a greater role in actually drawing viewers into a movie. When the researchers gave a…
  • Identifying 'stance taking' cues to enable sophisticated voice recognition

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:14 am
    In the future, computers may be capable of talking to us during meetings just like a remote teleconference participant. But to help move this science-fiction-sounding goal a step closer to reality, it's first necessary to teach computers to recognize not only the words we use but also the myriad meanings, subtleties and attitudes they can convey. read more
  • Compensation and punishment: 'Justice' depends on whether or not we're a victim

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:14 am
    We're more likely to punish wrongdoing as a third party to a non-violent offense than when we're victimized by it, according to a new study by New York University psychology researchers. The findings, which appear in the journal Nature Communications, may offer insights into how juries differ from plaintiffs in seeking to restore justice. read more
  • Lack of A level maths leading to fewer female economists

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:13 am
    A study by the University of Southampton has found there are far fewer women studying economics than men, with women accounting for just 27 per cent of economics students, despite them making up 57 per cent of the undergraduate population in UK universities. read more
  • How people view their own weight influences bariatric surgery success

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:02 pm
    Negative feelings about one's own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research appearing in the journal Obesity Surgery, published by Springer. The study, from the Geisinger Health System in the US, is considered the first and only study to examine internalized weight bias in relation to post-surgical weight loss success in adults. read more
 
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