Sociology

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  • The Truths Hidden in Right Wing Survivalism

    Sociological Stew
    10 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    On a right wing web page, every other headline screams that Obama is responsible for impending disaster and doom to American society.  But hidden within the polarizing rhetoric is often startlingly accurate analysis of the real sources of the problems and the dangers facing America today: a capitalist economic system that enshrines greed and wanton wealth accumulation over economic and social stability and human needs. This short video is typical of the genre aimed at "patriots" and emphasizing individualism and family it provides a surprisingly fact based and astute analysis of…
  • Collective Memory and the Danger of Forgetting

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer A few years ago I wrote about the importance of collective memories following the centennial coverage of the sinking of the Titanic. Collective memories are societal-level memories, shared by regularly told stories, and are often events we might have intimate knowledge of even if we weren’t born when they occurred. This year marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion at Normandy, the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, and the 20th anniversary of O.J. Simpson’s “slow speed chase” and subsequent arrest. Why are these events part of our…
  • Social Science Palooza IV

    NYT > Sociology
    3 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Most social science confirms the blindingly obvious. Here are eight examples where it doesn’t.
  • Social media project by Mayor Mazzarella proving a picture is worth a thousand words

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    27 Jul 2014 | 5:17 am
    LEOMINSTER -- Mayor Dean Mazzarella has been conducting his own sociology project using social media to better understand why people respond to issues differently.
  • Obedience, Authority, and Domination

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:48 am
    By Peter Kaufman “Because I said so!” I’m sure that many of us have either uttered these words or have heard them spoken to us. We hear this phrase expressed in a host of relationships: parent-child, teacher-student, supervisor-employee, and police officer-citizen. Saying this to someone is generally used to get them to obey your authority and do what you are telling them to do with as little resistance as possible. When we think about obedience to authority, we often think of the famous study by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. Most students have probably learned about the…
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Obedience, Authority, and Domination

    W. W. Norton
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:48 am
    By Peter Kaufman “Because I said so!” I’m sure that many of us have either uttered these words or have heard them spoken to us. We hear this phrase expressed in a host of relationships: parent-child, teacher-student, supervisor-employee, and police officer-citizen. Saying this to someone is generally used to get them to obey your authority and do what you are telling them to do with as little resistance as possible. When we think about obedience to authority, we often think of the famous study by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. Most students have probably learned about the…
  • Collective Memory and the Danger of Forgetting

    W. W. Norton
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer A few years ago I wrote about the importance of collective memories following the centennial coverage of the sinking of the Titanic. Collective memories are societal-level memories, shared by regularly told stories, and are often events we might have intimate knowledge of even if we weren’t born when they occurred. This year marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion at Normandy, the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, and the 20th anniversary of O.J. Simpson’s “slow speed chase” and subsequent arrest. Why are these events part of our…
  • Advertising Co-opts Social Science

    W. W. Norton
    14 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Sally Raskoff Have you seen the videos circulating that purport to be stories informed by social science? They are passed on to “enlighten” us about social issues and solutions. I have a few examples to share with you. The first is the Dove Evolution video about manipulating images for advertising. That one has been around awhile and does a good job of showing us how images change from the original photographs to what is actually published. (Jean Kilbourne does this well in her video, Still Killing Us Softly.)   Dove Real Beauty Sketches shows us an experiment in which people are…
  • So Fresh Saturdays: Public Events and Building Collective Action

    W. W. Norton
    11 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales One of the few reasons I keep a Facebook page is so that I can keep up to date on the various community-building activities within Chicago. These range from hyper-local block club parties and various neighborhood festivals, to citywide events and music concerts held in the downtown Loop area. In his book, Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect, Robert Sampson highlights the importance of community building activities as ways to increase collective efficacy. Put simply, collective efficacy means social cohesion (or connectivity) combined with…
  • Hotels and Stratification

    W. W. Norton
    7 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer Hotels are a great way to think about social stratification. There’s the obvious: some hotels are incredibly expensive and affordable only to a select few. In the board game Monopoly, those with hotels on their properties are often the wealthiest players. And hotels have hierarchical ratings, from one to five stars delineating their quality and likely the corresponding wealth of their visitors. But there are other ways in which hotels can teach us about economic inequality as well. Most of us are aware of two types of hotel guests: the business traveler and the…
 
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • UPDATED: Keele Student of the Year - Nicola Edwards

    10 Jul 2014 | 6:29 am
    We are delighted that Nicola Edwards, a Criminology and Sociology student has received the Neil and Gina Smith Student of the Year award.  This award was established in 2006 and four of the winners have been students in Criminology or Sociology.     Nicola's achievements are described in more detail here and below:"From an exceptionally strong pool of candidates, the awarding panel decided that Nicola Edwards should be the recipient of the 2014 Neil and Gina Smith Student of the Year  Award.  "Nicola graduates from Keele in 2014 with a First Class Honours Degree in…
  • A Prize Winner in Criminology - the 2014 Centre for Crime and Justice Studies Essay Competition

    26 Jun 2014 | 2:33 am
    Andrew Henley, a Graduate Teaching Assistant and PhD student in Criminology, is the winner of the 2014 Centre for Crime and Justice Studies essay competition. As their website reports, "Entrants to this year's competition were asked to write an essay of between 1,400 and 1,600 words on what criminal justice institution, or what aspect of policy or practice, they would want to see abolished. Andrew's essay, entitled 'Abolishing the stigma of punishments served', argued for the abolition of the routine requirement to declare criminal convictions.His essay concluded by arguing in favour of a…
  • Conference papers at 'The right to the city in an era of austerity', Paris

    12 Jun 2014 | 7:27 am
    Dr Ala Sirriyehand Dr Andrzej Zieleniec, (Sociology) recently gave papers at a conference at the Université Paris Ouest Nanterre/Université Paris-Sorbonne, ‘The right to the city in an era of austerity’. The abstracts for the papers are below.  A recent blog post about Andy’s work can be found hereand the final report that Ala’s co-authored paper was based on is here.  ‘The Great Meeting Place’: Bradford’s City Park, doing regeneration differently?Dr Nathan Manning (University of York) and Dr Ala Sirriyeh (Keele University)Recent accounts of urban space frequently…
  • Children, Collecting Experience, and the Natural Environment

    12 Jun 2014 | 6:32 am
    By Lydia Martens, Senior Lecturer in SociologyI have just completed the end of award report for the British Academy small grant Children, Collecting Experience, and the Natural Environment. The grant provided a budget to conduct ethnographic research on a holiday site on the North West coast of Scotland, during the summer months of 2012 and 2013. My research focused on the informal ways children learn to pay attention whilst being in the outdoor environment of this setting with family members and other children, using it as a resource in the creation of their activities. The research…
  • Immigration and Crime. A New Publication by Dr Clare Griffiths

    9 Jun 2014 | 6:08 am
    Immigration to the UK from Central and Eastern Europe remains a topic of contention in both political and media discourse. The debate as to whether mass immigration threatens order and security has been particularly prominent in the UK press again recently with the European elections. In a recent article in The Guardian, Nigel Farage has been quoted as saying there is a direct association between Romanian immigrants and criminality. This is not a new topic though and the association of immigration with crime has a long history in not only popular discourse but also in academic literature.
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    Sociological Stew

  • Why the Rich Hate Obama

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:23 am
    This morning I ran across an article "The Best Worst President Ever" by Mark Morford in SF Gate.  Morford observes a wealthy beneficiary of the economy under Obama proclaim Obama the "worst president ever." Morford then proceeds to give a litany of economic facts that provide ample evidence that this wealthy individual is almost certainly benefiting greatly from the economy during Obama's presidency. In the end Morford just laughs, and shakes his head at the "bizarre lament" of these crazy rich bastards. His only explanation is simple racism - rich white guys can't stand it that a black…
  • The Truths Hidden in Right Wing Survivalism

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    On a right wing web page, every other headline screams that Obama is responsible for impending disaster and doom to American society.  But hidden within the polarizing rhetoric is often startlingly accurate analysis of the real sources of the problems and the dangers facing America today: a capitalist economic system that enshrines greed and wanton wealth accumulation over economic and social stability and human needs. This short video is typical of the genre aimed at "patriots" and emphasizing individualism and family it provides a surprisingly fact based and astute analysis of…
  • Zombie America - Installment 5 UPDATED!

    6 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    America, the zombie nation that ONLY appears to be alive.  Excellent article about how economic reality on the ground of everyday life for most Americans contradicts the economic fantasies theory of economic and political elites who argue for more tax cuts for "job creators," also known as voodoo "trickle down" economics.See succinct article in Buzzflash  http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/trickle-down-economics-and-climate-deniers-face-an-insurmountable-challenge-realityThis is not debatable data: it is reality, like seeing rain gushing from the sky as proof that…
  • How Increases in Income Inequality Undermine Social Security

    28 Apr 2014 | 2:22 pm
    I spent several hours today working on a detailed example for my Inequality class, and thought that I would share it: Social Security retirement benefits are one of the most important things that prevents millions of elderly Americans from being poor.  Social security has been one of the most successful and most popular government programs in the past 80 years. As the baby boom generation ages and reaches retirement age (which began in 2011) and as the size of the younger generation of workers becomes smaller, people begin worrying about the solvency of the social security program.
  • America's Two Cultures

    13 Sep 2013 | 6:35 am
    Back in 1992 when James Davison Hunter published Culture Wars: The Struggle to Control the Family, Art, Education, Law and Politics in America, he was careful to note that America was not really divided into two distinct cultural camps, but rather what he was writing about were culturally extreme minorities (the "orthodox" and the "progressive") at either end of the a continuum in which most Americans fell on a middle ground. Several excellent pieces of sociological research, as well as personal observations, lead me to think that today's America is far closer to a "culture war"…
 
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    scatterplot

  • socsters are doin it for themselves

    jeremy
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:33 am
    Kieran has scraped and redone the ASA meeting online schedule so that one can easily add sessions to one’s calendar. In addition to making it easier to navigate the meetings, he has perhaps also spared us a round of lavishly dubious explanation for why something has to be the way that it is and why it would cost exorbitant amounts to be any different. That is: a larger parable might be drawn, but I have a course to prep and some fùtbol to cheer, so you’re on your own.
  • junior theorists symposium 2014

    Dan Hirschman
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:31 pm
    The final schedule for the 2014 Junior Theorists Symposium has just been released. If you’re going to be in the Bay Area the day before ASA (Friday, August 15), and have not already committed to one of the other pre-conferences, stop by 60 Evans Hall at the University of California (Berkeley) to see some amazing junior theory in action! If you have any questions, or would like to RSVP, just send an email to Jordanna Matlon and myself at juniortheorists@gmail.com.
  • download ASA schedule to calendar?

    olderwoman
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:28 am
    The room assignments have just appeared in the ASA’s calendar and show up in your personal schedule now. However, I don’t see any option as there were in past years to download this as a calendar file for import into Outlook or Google. Also the personal schedule I saved on the web interface does not seem to show up on the phone app after a login. Does anybody know how to do either of these? FYI here’s a link to what worked in 2012: http://djjr-courses.wikidot.com/asa:calendar  But the interface has changed since then.
  • milkman make this happen

    jeremy
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:26 pm
    I’m in a B&B in Mexico City, marking my first night in my home hemisphere in nearly eleven months. Travels ahead that culminate in ASA, so posting from me will presumably be light. During the 30 hour trip to get here, one of the films I saw on the plane was Tim’s Vermeer–in which a tinkerer without experience painting tries to reproduce a Vermeer using optics and a lot of craftsmanship–and I highly recommend it. Produced/directed by Penn and Teller. So, more than this: instead of An Evening With Malcolm Gladwell at ASA, we should try to get An Evening With Penn and…
  • you think applying for academic jobs is hard?

    olderwoman
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:53 am
    Since retiring, my spouse has been volunteering at the “job club,” helping low income people apply for jobs. Applicants for low-wage jobs need to apply on line, and many low-wage workers neither own computers nor have much experience using them. Plus they are often unfamiliar with the various verbal hoops applicants have to go through. One of the big ones are banks of attitude questions. Yesterday he spent a couple of hours with a woman applying to work as a baker in a donut franchise, not the chef who thinks up recipes, someone who just does the work of cooking and frosting. She…
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    potlatch

  • Big Ideas discussion - What is Neoliberalism? - 29th July

    Will
    1 Jul 2014 | 2:06 am
    I'll be speaking at the next Big Ideas event, at the Wheatsheaf pub, 25 Rathbone Place, London, at 8pm on Tuesday 29th July. These events are organised by Andrew McGettigan, and take place on the last Tuesday of every month, for anyone who wants to turn up and discuss ideas. I'll be speaking on the topic 'What is neoliberalism?', and the blurb is here: It is often argued that, starting with the Reagan and Thatcher governments in the 1980s, economic policy-making around the world has become dominated by ‘neoliberalism’. This tends to imply something about free markets, but…
  • 'Trials and Tribulations in Economics' - seminar, 26th September

    Will
    26 Jun 2014 | 5:53 am
    As mentioned here before, I am one of the Co-Investigators on an ESRC Seminar Series, 'Spaces of Evidence', which explores various types of evidence (such as Randomised Controlled Trials) which are at work in policy, management and elite decision-making today. I'm convening the next seminar at Goldsmiths, London, on the 26th September, which will explore new directions in economic policy evidence, including RCTs and big data. We have quite a nice mix of speakers, including some who will look sceptically at this new empiricist turn, others who are actually practicing it, plus Angus…
  • against quality

    Will
    23 Jun 2014 | 1:57 pm
    If you'll excuse the Krapp's Last Blogpost splintered chronicity, I wrote a blogpost just before Christmas, which I then opted not to publish, on grounds that it was even too pretentiously curmudgeonly for me. 'How the hell can that be?', you ask. I guess I felt it was just a little too sneering at the simple pleasures of life, or maybe a little too moralistic. But then I read Kate Crawford's excellent essay, The Anxieties of Big Data, and wondered if I'd actually had an inadvertent whiff of the zeitgeist after all. As she articulates it there: the rapid rise of the…
  • new piece on competitiveness

    Will
    19 May 2014 | 11:43 pm
    I've published a new piece at the LSE Politics and Policy blog, 'How 'competitiveness' became one of the great unquestioned virtues of contemporary culture'. The argument won't be much of a surprise to any regular readers of this blog! Here is a chunk: We celebrate London because it is a competitive world city; we worship sportsmen for having won; we turn on our televisions and watch contestants competitively cooking against each other. In TV shows such as the Dragons Den or sporting contests such as the Premier League, the division between competitive entertainment…
  • book launch 10th June

    Will
    14 May 2014 | 4:11 am
    I'm having a launch for my book, which is out next week. It's happening from 6-8pm on 10th June at Goldsmiths, with a discussion, some free booze and copies of the book available for a miniscule £20! To find out more and register to attend, please click here.
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    orgtheory.net

  • holy smokes, reagan and bush both supported open immigration – just watch this clip

    fabiorojas
    27 Jul 2014 | 7:42 pm
    This clip is full of rationality, sanity, and basic human decency. Reagan even proposes an essentially open US/Mexico border at the end. When Reagan is to the left of Obama, it shows our policies are in need of serious overhaul. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power  
  • this is museum week on orgtheory

    fabiorojas
    27 Jul 2014 | 5:01 pm
    This week, we’ll have a series of posts dedicated to museums. Some will be personal, others academic. Here’s the line up: Tuesday: The trials of the George Lucas museum. Wednesday: Why the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame could be better. Thursday: The limits of institutional theory as applied to museums. Friday: What the Creationism Museum in Kentucky tells us about social movements. For some, it’ll be better than shark week. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power 
  • get asa 2014 events into your calendar more easily

    Kieran
    26 Jul 2014 | 9:04 pm
    I got sick of navigating the ASA Meeting Calendar thing, so I threw together something some of you might find useful. You can see what’s happening on various days, but also—and this is the potentially useful part—every event has an associated .ics file for you to download and import into your preferred calendar application such as iCal, Outlook, Google Calendar, and so on. Dates, times, summary information, and locations included. Enjoy.
  • jazz(game of thrones)

    fabiorojas
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:04 pm
    50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power
  • explanation of jeff koons

    fabiorojas
    25 Jul 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Warning: Some of Koons’ work is NSFW! Not for kids. Except for the cheesy intro music, I like this review of Jeff Koons’ recent show. I’ve always had this love/hate approach to his work and I think this discussion by art critic Rodrigo Canete helps out. #puppies 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Ms Rogers’ Neighborhood

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:11 am
    ##July 24, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWhy are all these parents being arrested? That was the question raised by Ross Douthat’s recent column. It’s also the title of an article in The Week that Douthat links to in a follow-up blog post.* The author, Michael Brendan Dougherty, sees two causes.1.  A decline of neighborliness (Dougherty borrows this from Timothy Carney, The Washington Examiner (here Timothy Carney, a columnist for The Washington Examiner ). Neighborly adults look after an unsupervised kid who might be in need. Un-neighborly adults call 911. The State is less flexible in…
  • Naming Variables

    21 Jul 2014 | 7:02 am
    July 21, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonVariable labels – not the sort of problem that should excite much debate. Still, it’s important to identify your variables as what they really are. If I’m comparing, say, New Yorkers with Clevelanders, should I call my independent variable “Sophistication” (Gothamites, as we all know, are more sophisticated)? Or should it be “City” (or “City of residence”)? “Sophistication” would be sexier, “City” would  more accurate.Dan Ariely does experiments about cheating.  In a recent experiment, he compared East Germans and West…
  • Nannies and States

    20 Jul 2014 | 7:49 am
    July 20, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonRoss Douthat is puzzled. He seems to sense that a liberal policy might actually help, but his high conservative principles and morality keep him from taking that step. It’s a political version of Freudian repression – the conservative superego forcing tempting ideas to remain out of awareness. In today’s column, Douthat recounts several anecdotes of criminal charges brought against parents whose children were unsupervised for short periods of time.  The best-known of these criminals of late is Debra Harrell, the mother in South Carolina who let…
  • Charlie Haden (1937-2014)

    12 Jul 2014 | 5:34 am
    July 12, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonAt age 22, Charlie Haden was the bassist the original Ornette Coleman quartet.  He had already been playing for a couple of years with bebop pianist Hampton Hawes.  Ornette played music that, at the time (1959), was considered so far out that many listeners dismissed it as noise. (“They play ‘Some of These Days’ in five different keys simultaneously.”) Ornette became even freer, moving even further from the basic changes, and Charlie followed along.Haden was also a very melodic bass player. That’s especially clear in his duo work with…
  • Needs (One More Time)

    10 Jul 2014 | 5:33 am
    July 10, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonBefore I read Benjamin Schmidt’s post in the Atlantic (here) about anachronistic language in “Mad Men,” I had never noticed how today we use “need to” where earlier generations would have said “ought to” or “should.” Now, each “need to” jumps out at me from the screen.*  Here is today’s example.Why not: “Even more proof health care records should go digital”?In a post a year ago (here), I speculated that the change was part of a more general shift away from the language of morality and towards the language of individual…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Get ASA 2014 Meeting Events into your Calendar More Easily

    26 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    I got sick of navigating the ASA Meeting Calendar thing, so I threw together something some of you might find useful. You can see what’s happening on various days, but also—and this is the potentially useful part—every event has an associated .ics file for you to download and import into your preferred calendar application such as iCal, Outlook, Google Calendar, and so on. Dates, times, summary information, and locations included. Enjoy.
  • This is Just to Say he Wishes

    18 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Had I the heavens’ enripened fruits, Abloom with their epicuticular wax, Cherry and sloe and chickasaw fruits, Blue damson, greengage, mirabelle snacks, I would make for you plum jam so sweet: But I, being peckish, ate yours while alone I have eaten the plums you kept out of the heat Tread softly because there may be a stone. (After this.)
  • Gary Becker, an appreciation by Michel Foucault

    3 May 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Gary Becker, University Professor of Economics and Sociology at the University of Chicago, has died at the age of eighty three. I am certainly not going to attempt an obituary or assessment. But something Tim Carmody said on Twitter caught my eye: “People sometimes talk about ‘neoliberalism’ as a kind of intellectual bogeyman. Gary Becker was the actual guy.” In a somewhat similar way, people sometimes talked about ‘poststructuralism’ as a kind of intellectual bogeyman, and Michel Foucault was the actual guy. It is worth looking at what one avatar had to…
  • Success Breeds Success, Up to a Point

    28 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Back in February, when Flappy Bird Frenzy was at its peak, I wrote about some of the social aspects of success and failure in cultural markets, inspired in part by a discussion on ATP. I drew on some work from the early 2000s by Duncan Watts, Matt Salganik, and Peter Sheridan Dodds that experimentally established that there was a strong measure of arbitrariness to success. You can read the original post for the details. Today, PNAS published a paper by the sociologists Arnout van de Rijt, Soong Moon Kang, Michael Restivo, and Akshay Patil that brings some new and interesting work to bear on…
  • Silver vs Krugman

    25 Mar 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nate Silver’s relaunched FiveThirtyEight has been getting some flak from critics—including many former fans—for failing to live up to expectations. Specifically, critics have argued that instead of foxily modeling data and working the numbers, Silver and his co-contributors are looking more like regular old opinion columnists with rather better chart software. Paul Krugman has been a prominent critic, arguing that “For all the big talk about data-driven analysis, what [the site] actually delivers is sloppy and casual opining with a bit of data used, as the old saying…
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    chris uggen's weblog

  • Real Gutter Stories

    9 Jul 2014 | 8:52 am
    It takes courage to tell a big audience of strangers how your picture somehow ended up next to the headline "Drug Bust Nets Large Haul: Police Find Cocaine, Methamphetamine, and Viagra." The excellent Life of the Law podcast team brought a series of such painfully honest and powerful stories to the stage this summer. These two are my favorites, from two outstanding young scholars and friends.
  • Elliot Rodger and Violence Against Women

    24 May 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Shock, frustration, and rage. That's our reaction to the hate-filled video record that Elliot Rodger left behind. The 22-year-old, believed to have killed 6 people in Santa Barbara last night, left behind a terrible internet trail.I cannot and will not speculate about the "mind of the killer" in such cases, but I can offer a little perspective on the nature and social context of these acts. This sometimes entails showing how mass shootings (or school shootings) remain quite rare, or that crime rates have plummeted in the past 20 years. I won't repeat those reassurances here,…
  • Barney Kessel on Record Store Day

    19 Apr 2014 | 3:56 pm
    Oh sure, it is much easier to get your music online. And it is much cheaper to obtain it via "sharing," to borrow the kids' charming euphemism, rather than "paying." But neither experience can match the unexpected delight of holding a treasured obscurity in a real record store. And if said obscurity remains in good condition, it can fill your home with a sound that warms and glows like an actual log on an actual fire. On this national record store day, I hunted for a romantic big-guitar Barney Kessel album to take the damp chill from the air. A fitting choice, it turns out, given Mr.
  • Buzzo on Chemicals and Creativity

    2 Mar 2014 | 12:39 pm
    A promising student recently told me that s/he found drugs and alcohol "necessary" to do really creative work. "That's bovine excrement," I explained (though a bit more emphatically and not exactly in those words). Elaborating, I suggested that any short-run benefits to such a strategy quickly morph into much larger long-run liabilities. Plus, there are far healthier ways to address the underlying problems that the chemicals purport to solve -- try running or blogging, for example, if you want to overcome inhibitions, anxiety, or writer's block. I'm not sure whether my li'l lecture got…
  • Screens for Glass Houses

    22 Feb 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Social media feeds are like carnival money booths: we snatch away greedily as the links swirl past, but we're rarely enriched by the experience. In the rush to process so much so quickly, we've become lousy filters for one another – recommending “great articles” that ain't so great by social science standards.  Many rapidly-circulating stories offer grand assertions but paltry evidence about the social world. It seems silly to direct much intellectual horsepower at every li'l item whooshing past (why, that Upworthy post needs an interrupted time-series design!). So people seem…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Don't trust the vet to euthanize your terminally ill pets

    Old Jules
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:19 pm
    Hi readers.  If that death penalty fiasco in Arizona didn’t teach anything else worth knowing, it taught that.  If Arizona State Department of Corrections took over the animal killing from the Humane Society the animals would all be dying of old age, getting healthier while everyone waited with bated breath for the final solution. Thank goodness it was a human being they did that to instead of a cat. Old Jules
  • Easter Sunrise Service at Red Rocks

    thejeremynix
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:01 pm
    the price of worship nature’s amphitheater the true believers at the crack of dawn they hike up the steep incline to honor Jesus a celebration of a miraculous tale of Resurrection
  • Final score: 4-2

    redemptiontimez
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:11 pm
    Hello everyone! Things are moving quickly during this three month training period. I am glad to see that as time goes by, my work here becomes clearer. I have been working on my project goal # 1: Community development and business advising. I have become more acquainted with the city of Chalatalengo and also with my Guardados community.  Tomorrow I will have a meeting with a former member of a women’s group that dissolved because of internal conflicts, the goal is to regroup these women and advise them in aspects that can help them achieve their goals. For those who are curious, below is a…
  • Kisii University International Conference Programme for 2014

    Prof. Maurice Amutabi's Blog
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:38 pm
    Kisii University Conference Programme July 30- August 2, 2014 Final Message from Convenor of 1st International Annual Interdisciplinary Conference Prof. Maurice Nyamanga Amutabi, PhD Welcome to the KISII UNIVERSITY (KSU) Ladies and gentlemen, I would like to take this opportunity to invite you to the First Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference, taking place at the Kisii University (KSU) from July 30 to August 2, 2014, Kisii, Kenya on behalf of the management of this university, led by our Vice Chancellor John S. Akama. It is a great honour to welcome over 500 of you, to this…
  • My Sweatpants Dilemma - A War on Drugs - Fast Food World

    CRAT
    24 Jul 2014 | 4:32 pm
    Recently I have come to a few conclusions about my life, but one is more than troubling to me. I was once very much in shape and athletic… now, it’s much more pathetic… and trust me… This is not an anti-fat post, all this is, is a mere realization that ‘I’ need to get my shit together because I am feeling unhealthy. A few moments of clarity. Moment 1… I went into a retail store to pick up a couple of household items and seen a young gentlemen walking through the store that was wearing sweatpants. Now I’m going to flash back a quick minute……
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Try, try again? Study says no

    25 Jul 2014 | 6:08 am
    When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language that often elude adults. Within months of living in a foreign country, a young child may speak a second language like a native speaker. read more
  • Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

    24 Jul 2014 | 5:46 pm
    When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often have less trust in government and democracy. read more
  • 3-D image of Paleolithic child's skull reveals trauma, brain damage

    24 Jul 2014 | 10:39 am
    Three-dimensional imaging of a Paleolithic child's skull reveals potentially violent head trauma that likely lead to brain damage, according to a study published July 23, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hélène Coqueugniot and colleagues from CNRS -- Université de Bordeaux and EPHE. read more
  • Missing sleep may hurt your memory

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine. read more
  • Greater odds of adverse childhood experiences in those with military service

    24 Jul 2014 | 12:13 am
    Men and women who have served in the military have a higher prevalence of adverse childhood events (ACEs), suggesting that enlistment may be a way to escape adversity for some. read more
 
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    Well Written Documents

  • Will Voice Recognition Software Replace Manual Transcription?

    Guest Author
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Transcription Versus Voice Recognition The advent of speech recognition (SR) software promises great prospects in the field of transcription. Many transcriptionists have adopted this technology, which allows them to give voice input and then software does all the typing. This … Continue reading →
  • Fictional Writer, Carrie Bradshaw, on The Pen Versus Love

    Charlene Rossell
    13 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Writing About Love is a Universal Effort Every great writer, fictional writer or a real-life professional writer, has tried his or her hand at writing about love at one point or another. It has become a topic that stands as an epic abstract … Continue reading →
  • Writing Inspirational Lyrics Gives Hope to Survivors of 9-11

    Hope Benefield
    8 Sep 2013 | 3:45 pm
    Survivor Songs—Writing Stories of Hope Twelve years after 9-11, poet Gene Scheer is writing inspirational lyrics to accompany music by Jake Heggie on the new album “Here/After: Songs of lost voices”.  The lyrics inspire a sense of hope and renewal; … Continue reading →
  • Writing Strong Female Characters: Wonder Woman vs. The Glass Ceiling

    Hope Benefield
    1 Sep 2013 | 4:00 pm
    Hollywood Has No Room for Wonder Woman, Only a Glass Ceiling Writing strong female characters hasn’t been a top priority for Hollywood where superheroes are concerned. Superman, Batman, Spiderman, Thor…are all male heroes. But where are the heroines? Wonder Woman … Continue reading →
  • Ancient Text The Epic of Gilgamesh is Surprisingly Scandalous & Sordid

    Charlene Rossell
    26 Aug 2013 | 6:34 am
    An Ancient Text with a Jerry Springer Style Plot An ancient text can help us better understand the history of the world.  Questions about how people lived, why they married and even basic things like what they ate can be … Continue reading →
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    Acceptable Confusion - Opinion

  • June 30th, 2014

    30 Jun 2014 | 7:41 am
    An Original Thought? I had a thought this morning. It was not alone by any stretch of the imagination. There were as usual many others but perhaps this one particular thought, or idea, whatever you want to call it, was possibly original. It could well have been independent, but after thinking further (about that thought), it got me thinking much, much further about thought in general. My genuinely original thought, well, it could well have been the first time it had been thought, but there is, I think, a very high likelihood that it was an absolutely unoriginal thought and a sad imitation of…
  • April 18th, 2014

    18 Apr 2014 | 9:15 am
    Gay Marriage for You, Gay Marriage for Me This is something truly fascinating. This is something quite absurd, shocking and powerful all at once. It is an act of hypocrisy, of double-standards and an unethical like-for-unlike swap. How could this have happened so quickly? Millennia of palatable religious doctrinal intolerance subverted and quashed in the wink of a cripplingly- mascaraed eyelash. Following years of struggle against injustice, inequality and sheer ignorance, man and man, woman and woman are now permitted, condoned, accepted – whatever verb you wish to apply to this…
  • April 11th, 2014

    11 Apr 2014 | 7:54 am
    For Love, Not Money When one visits Japan, one of the most memorable take-outs – and there are many – is the undeniably extreme level of service one experiences, almost universally, when travelling, shopping, eating or even just crossing the street. This high-value service proposition, underlines much of inner workings of the Japanese society, the reluctance to say ‘no’, combined with the ever present ‘tatemai’ – the public face one wears, whilst outside and interacting with society – combine superbly well for a pleasurable, Teflon-coated…
  • April 04th, 2014

    4 Apr 2014 | 10:43 am
    Smoke Screen E-cigarettes seem to present a largely innocuous and healthy alternative to the obvious risks of antiquated tobacco smoking. While full testing of the health advantages and disadvantages of E-cigarettes or ‘vaping’, as it is otherwise known (due to the vapour inhaling of liquefied nicotine) are not yet fully concluded, the product would, on the surface, appear to help smokers reduce or even cut out completely their use of tobacco and its well-documented health risks. This is a good thing. This is a very good thing. Patches, gum, lozenges and even the old-fashioned…
  • March 28th, 2014

    28 Mar 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Culturalism I have a slight confession to make and admittedly, it may seem a little strange to some. I however, consider it somewhat of a personal cultural enlightenment. Lately, I have found myself appreciating, perhaps even considering with a sense of romantic affection, the adornment generally known as the Hijab. Much like a figure-hugging dress, golden flowing locks, or that smile, I have started to become aware of the much nuanced sex-appeal of the frequently chastised traditional Muslim headwear. Steering clear of any religious debate over personal freedoms or more significant forms of…
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    jonathanrex.com

  • Body Sculpting

    J Rex
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:29 pm
    When I was four years old I began going with my father to Taekwondo classes in San Francisco and continued doing it up until High School. Growing up I also played baseball, basketball, football and briefly studied Judo and Boxing as well. If one were to see me as a child it would be very [&hellip
  • Cultural Appropriation

    J Rex
    26 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    Is there a difference between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation? This seems to be an issue that a lot of people are discussing lately and the answer to me is actually fairly simple. Yes, there is a difference. If I encounter another people and through my encountering them we draw inspiration from each other and [&hellip
  • Die Antwoord

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:27 pm
    Die Antwoord is an Independent South African Rap-Rave group featuring lead vocalists Watkin Tudor Jones (Ninja) and Anri du Toit (Yolandi Visser) along with their DJ, Hi-Tek. Jones previously released albums with prior groups Max Normal and Constructus Corporation before teaming up with his personal assistant Anri and forming Die Antwoord in 2008. With the [&hellip
  • The Magus

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:14 pm
    It’s very rare that I pick up a work of fiction and read it from beginning to end in one sitting without any interruptions. The Magus by John Fowles was that rare exception. The paperback cover is what initially caught my eye (I’m pretty basic and any image of a fit nude woman gets my [&hellip
  • Bones and Blues

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:08 pm
    From 1946 to 1961 the Soviet Union banned music from the United States and Western Europe. Owning certain Jazz, Blues and Rock N Roll records could get you thrown out of school and in extreme cases sent to prison camps. Anytime something is made illegal an underground black market fills the void established by restrictions [&hellip
 
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