Sociology

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  • Getting a Job with a Criminal Record

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer In a competitive job environment, having a criminal record might effectively exclude someone from legal employment. For some jobs, it makes sense to exclude people who have committed specific offenses in the past. No one wants their cable installer to be a convicted burglar, their child’s teacher to be a sex offender, or their accountant to have committed forgery. But for many people who have past offenses, the charges have less to do with their character than the communities in which they live. Check out this clip from Last Week Tonight, which examines how municipal…
  • The "Boy Problem" of the Twenty-first Century

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales and Angel Rubiel Gonzalez Gonzalez holds a Ph.D. in Education from UC Berkeley and is currently a social studies teacher in New York City In 2013, Christina Hoff Sommers wrote an op-ed for the New York Times which discussed the growing educational gap between boys and girls within the U.S. Sommers blames much of this gap on what she terms “misguided policies” that perpetuate an educational gender inequity that favors girls over boys. In order to create more boy-friendly classrooms, Sommers advocates for increased play time (recess), single-sex classrooms, and male…
  • Seeing Others as Us

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    13 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman In 2012, there were over 1,000 documented hate groups in the United States. A hate group is pretty much what it sounds like: a collection of individuals who come together based on their shared animosity toward others. Whether they focus on race, religion, sexual orientation, or nationality, these organizations mobilize around a clearly defined difference that they perceive to have with other people. Groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, Aryan Brotherhood, Westboro Baptist Church, and the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement, use these differences not only as a basis of their…
  • Dual Book Review Symposium: Jeremy Seabrook, Pauperland: Poverty and the Poor in Britain

    SagePub: Sociology
    Fitzpatrick, T.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
  • Examples of under-enforced rules, laws, taboos, norms?

    Metafilter: Sociology
    mrmanvir
    4 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
    Hivemind! Does anyone know any examples of rules, regulations, laws, or norms that are under-enforced (e.g., violations go unpunished), leading the rule to completely destabilize (i.e., no one follows it)? I'm sure that there are A LOT of examples of this - stuff from any and all disciplines and scales would be welcome. I'm preferentially searching for unconventional examples (e.g., rules of children's games, supernaturally-sanctioned laws of hunter-gatherer bands) and I'm also looking especially for primary literature (e.g., experiments, case studies, etc.), but ultimately anything would be…
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • Sociology professor enjoys teaching while researching - Kansas State Collegian

    19 Apr 2015 | 8:50 pm
    Kansas State CollegianSociology professor enjoys teaching while researchingKansas State CollegianFor K-State's Alisa Garni, associate professor of sociology, anthropology and social work, her scariest experience was in El Salvador while working in a rural community as she pursued her master's degree. Where she lived, buses were the only practical
  • Ambler, MC sociology professor, retires after 25 years - The Daily Times

    18 Apr 2015 | 8:56 pm
    Ambler, MC sociology professor, retires after 25 yearsThe Daily TimesAmbler, who holds degrees from the University of Oklahoma and Ohio State University, has taught sociology at the college since 1990. Her teaching areas include social problems, population, sociology of Appalachian culture and social sciences research ...and more »
  • NEH to fund summer research for Jewish studies and sociology professor - Vanderbilt University News

    17 Apr 2015 | 2:14 pm
    Vanderbilt University NewsNEH to fund summer research for Jewish studies and sociology professorVanderbilt University NewsVanderbilt professor Shaul Kelner was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities grant for summer research. Kelner is an associate professor of Jewish studies and sociology as well as director of the Jewish studies program. The grant aids Kelner
  • This week's reviews: Nature documentary explores primate sociology - Columbus Dispatch (blog)

    17 Apr 2015 | 7:10 am
    This week's reviews: Nature documentary explores primate sociologyColumbus Dispatch (blog)This examination sheds interesting insight into the nature of both macaque and human sociology. The film has plenty of light moments for its under-18 viewers. Some of the explanation of macaque social hierarchy may fly over the heads of these viewers.
  • BREAKING: Department of Sociology & Anthropology Urges Board to Divest - The Daily Gazette

    17 Apr 2015 | 7:01 am
    The Daily GazetteBREAKING: Department of Sociology & Anthropology Urges Board to DivestThe Daily GazetteWe appreciate that as a Board, you are wrestling with the ways forward for Swarthmore with regard to the College's investment in fossil fuels, reduction of our carbon emissions, sustainability, and other strategies for addressing climate change. As and more »
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • The "Boy Problem" of the Twenty-first Century

    W. W. Norton
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales and Angel Rubiel Gonzalez Gonzalez holds a Ph.D. in Education from UC Berkeley and is currently a social studies teacher in New York City In 2013, Christina Hoff Sommers wrote an op-ed for the New York Times which discussed the growing educational gap between boys and girls within the U.S. Sommers blames much of this gap on what she terms “misguided policies” that perpetuate an educational gender inequity that favors girls over boys. In order to create more boy-friendly classrooms, Sommers advocates for increased play time (recess), single-sex classrooms, and male…
  • Getting a Job with a Criminal Record

    W. W. Norton
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer In a competitive job environment, having a criminal record might effectively exclude someone from legal employment. For some jobs, it makes sense to exclude people who have committed specific offenses in the past. No one wants their cable installer to be a convicted burglar, their child’s teacher to be a sex offender, or their accountant to have committed forgery. But for many people who have past offenses, the charges have less to do with their character than the communities in which they live. Check out this clip from Last Week Tonight, which examines how municipal…
  • Seeing Others as Us

    W. W. Norton
    13 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman In 2012, there were over 1,000 documented hate groups in the United States. A hate group is pretty much what it sounds like: a collection of individuals who come together based on their shared animosity toward others. Whether they focus on race, religion, sexual orientation, or nationality, these organizations mobilize around a clearly defined difference that they perceive to have with other people. Groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, Aryan Brotherhood, Westboro Baptist Church, and the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement, use these differences not only as a basis of their…
  • Measures of Central Tendency

    W. W. Norton
    8 Apr 2015 | 9:59 am
    By Sally Raskoff Have you taken a statistics course? Don’t wait too long if you are procrastinating. Mastering that material helps with other classes and in life. One of the key concepts within statistics is measures of central tendency: mean, median, and mode. Each one tells us about how the data, for one variable or concept, cluster together although each are calculated differently. The mean is the numerical average. You’ve probably already been calculating means —also known as averages. Add up however many scores or values in your data and divide by how many you have. Your grade…
  • Ask a Sociologist

    W. W. Norton
    27 Mar 2015 | 2:59 pm
    Have a sociological question for our bloggers? Ask us and it may appear as part of a future post!
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    SagePub: Sociology

  • Dual Book Review Symposium: Jeremy Seabrook, Pauperland: Poverty and the Poor in Britain

    Fitzpatrick, T.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
  • No Crisis but Methodological Separatism: A Comparative Study of Finnish and Danish Publication Trends between 1990 and 2009

    Erola, J., Reimer, D., Rasanen, P., Kropp, K.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    This article compares methodological trends in nationally and internationally oriented sociology using data from the articles of three Nordic sociological journals: one international (Acta Sociologica), one Finnish (Sosiologia), and one Danish (Dansk Sociologi). The data consists of 943 articles in total: 353 published in Acta Sociologica, 277 in Sosiologia and 313 in Dansk Sociologi over the period 1990–2009. We distinguish between three main types of article: those having no or very little empirical content; empirical articles applying qualitative analysis; and empirical articles…
  • The Hidden Internationalism of Elite English Schools

    Brooks, R., Waters, J.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    Analyses of UK higher education have provided compelling evidence of the way in which this sector has been affected by globalisation. There is now a large literature documenting the internationalisation of British universities, and the strategic and economic importance attached to attracting students from abroad. Within the schools sector, it has been argued that parents are increasingly concerned about the acquisition of valuable multicultural ‘global capital’. Nevertheless, we know little about whether ‘internationalism’ and/or the inculcation of ‘global…
  • On Ambivalence and Hope in the Restless Search for Community: How to Work with the Idea of Community in the Global Age

    Mulligan, M.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    Sociologists have been debating the idea of community for over a century with some continuing to suggest that it has no relevance in the contemporary world. Attempts to turn to other terms – such as ‘social capital’ – have not worked and many scholars have suggested that the desire for community has increased in a world of global insecurities. Gerard Delanty’s work on the communicative construction of community is the best attempt to unpack the contemporary meaning of the word yet he underplays the dangers of community and he stops short of contemplating the…
  • Do Parents Matter? Revisiting Ethnic Penalties in Occupation among Second Generation Ethnic Minorities in England and Wales

    Zuccotti, C. V.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    The article studies the role of the class of origin in the occupational outcomes of second generation ethnic minorities and white British in England and Wales. In so doing, it reconsiders the relationship between ‘ethnic penalties’ and intergenerational social reproduction (or the reverse: intergenerational social mobility) by combining approaches from the migration and social stratification literatures. Two main hypotheses are tested. The first states that the class of origin, or parental social background, helps explain differences in occupational outcomes between ethnic…
 
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Examples of under-enforced rules, laws, taboos, norms?

    mrmanvir
    4 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
    Hivemind! Does anyone know any examples of rules, regulations, laws, or norms that are under-enforced (e.g., violations go unpunished), leading the rule to completely destabilize (i.e., no one follows it)? I'm sure that there are A LOT of examples of this - stuff from any and all disciplines and scales would be welcome. I'm preferentially searching for unconventional examples (e.g., rules of children's games, supernaturally-sanctioned laws of hunter-gatherer bands) and I'm also looking especially for primary literature (e.g., experiments, case studies, etc.), but ultimately anything would be…
  • Are we more or less honest than a hundred years ago?

    mecran01
    12 Mar 2015 | 12:49 am
    Are the citizens of the U.S. more or less honest than a hundred years ago? Is there any longitudinal research that explores this question? I'm always hearing people decry the corruption and dishonesty of people in general, but from what I can tell, we have always been ripping each other off. Is there any solid research, like a workplace integrity test or something, that has been consistently administered over the last 50-100 years that could answer this question meaningfully?
  • Primers on Bourdieu

    codacorolla
    9 Mar 2015 | 1:13 pm
    I'm interested in becoming more familiar with Bourdieu's ideas of habitas, fields, and forms of capital. I'd like to start with a primer book, or perhaps a collection of essays, that go over his ideas. Can you recommend one that covers these main ideas, frames them in terms of contemporary theorists, and is fairly accessible?
  • examples of technologies or social institutions that are "stuck"

    mrmanvir
    9 Mar 2015 | 7:52 am
    HIVEMIND! Does anyone know of any examples of technologies or social institutions that are "stuck" at some sub-optimal state, where we recognize that there are better alternatives out there, but everyone is just used to the current situation and coordinating a huge shift is just too difficult? The clearest example I can think of is having the Qwerty keyboard instead of the Dvorak, where we know that one is better but instituting it would require massive coordination and huge startup costs.
  • Examples of taboos on holy or religiously influential people?

    mrmanvir
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:59 pm
    Maori chiefs were taboo'd from eating inside their houses, the Jewish Kohen (priests) couldn't handle dead bodies, and clerical classes across religious traditions have required celibacy -- does anyone know of any other examples of taboos on holy or religiously influential people? The cultures can range from contemporary big religions (e.g. Abrahamic) to the animism of small-scale societies - all examples are welcome!! THANKS!
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • Have you attacked a Somali yet? Terrorism and bigotry on the web

    20 Apr 2015 | 7:49 am
    By Mwenda Kailemia, Lecturer in Criminology  In this post Mwenda Kailemia reflects on the views of Ayaan Hirsi on the terrorist attacks in Kenya. Mwenda recently wrote a piece for The Guardian on these attacks.  When she used to be a Somali heroine - before she became a republican gadfly - Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s biography embodied the collective hope and pain of the Somali nation. We read in her Nomad not only the challenges of democratic institutional building (for example, in her familial travails in conservative Saudi Arabia or in her father’s experiences in Siad…
  • Mobile Phones and Enforcement Retreat

    6 Mar 2015 | 6:43 am
    By Adam Snow, PhD student, Criminology According to reports out recently we are in the midst of a retreat from road policing enforcement of mobile phone use behind the wheel, although some novel ideas (ironic font) are being used.  I leave aside the serious claim made by Suzette Davenport, the Chief Constable of Gloucestershire, that enforcement is being back peddled due to the upcoming election.  If true this a very serious accusation and one that shouldn't be ignored given the person making the accusation.I wondered, being a curious type and someone who is interested in road…
  • What is the Meaning of Syriza?

    28 Jan 2015 | 3:17 am
    By Dr Mark FeatherstoneWhat is the meaning of Syriza, the big winners in the Greek elections earlier this week, whose rise to power led the British Prime Minister, David Cameron, to warn against increased economic uncertainty and turbulence? The root of Cameron’s concern is clear – Syriza are against austerity and want to renegotiate the terms of Greece’s bailout package with the EU and centrally their German creditors. It is well documented, by writers such as Costas Douzinas, that Greece’s debt repayment plan has effectively destroyed the country’s social structure and left…
  • Keele Refugee Week 2015 Call for Events

    23 Jan 2015 | 1:42 am
    It may be five months away but we are already gearing up for Keele Refugee Week 2015! ‘Refugee Week is a UK-wide programme of arts, cultural and education events and activities that celebrates the contribution of refugees to the UK and promotes better understanding of why people seek sanctuary’ (Refugee Week 2015). Last year Keele University joined Refugee Week for the first time by hosting a weeklong photographic exhibition, an opening event with a musical performance and a poetry open mic night organised by students. This was co-organized by staff and students in the Faculty of…
  • New paper by Ala Sirriyeh on class and the new UK family migration rules

    14 Jan 2015 | 4:30 am
    In July 2012 the Conservative–Liberal Democrat Coalition government introduced a new set of family migration rules. These rules set a sharp increase in the minimum income threshold for people sponsoring partners and children to join them in the UK. Consequently, there has been a significant reduction in the number of visas granted through the family migration route. The journal Critical Social Policy has just published an article I have written which examines these new rules. The article is called ‘‘All need is love and £18,600’: class and the new UK family migration rules’ and…
 
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    scatterplot

  • replication vs. robustness in social science

    Dan Hirschman
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:10 pm
    Economist Michael Clemens has posted a very useful working paper attempting to bring order to the chaotic discussions of replication tests in the social sciences. Clemens argues for a clean conceptual distinction between replication tests on the one hand, and robustness tests on the other. A replication test “estimates parameters drawn from the same sampling distribution as those in the original study.” (p. 1) A robustness test, on the other hand, “estimates parameters drawn from a different sampling distribution from those in the original study.” (p. 2) Replication,…
  • living social science.

    jessica
    14 Apr 2015 | 4:49 pm
    Update (4/15/15): I’ve since heard that this idea emerged in a class at Price’s undergraduate institution, Seattle Pacific University (also where I became a Sociology major thanks to a class taught by another Price). In other words, having students consider how social science can inform their own lives and future decision-making as part of classes could have a tremendous impact on how they carry that knowledge into the world. Something academics should take seriously and cultivate. – – – I have long been fascinated by quests to live out proscriptions (whether…
  • research on self-regulation and success.

    jessica
    9 Apr 2015 | 10:58 am
    As a follow-up to previous scatterplot discussions of impostorism, I thought that some readers might be interested in participating in an online study of faculty well-being, self-regulation, and the impostor phenomenon: http://www.ame1.net/sasfacultystudy/ h/t: Shit Academics Say
  • caution about three-article dissertations

    mike3550
    9 Apr 2015 | 10:00 am
    Over at The Evil EmpireOrgTheory, Fabio makes a case that, as a default, dissertations should take the form of three-paper (or, more generally N-paper) format. On the whole, I totally agree and think that the three-paper format helped me finish grad school and set me up well for my post-doc and life on tenure track. But the conversation on three-paper dissertations (or, equivalently, “digital” dissertations in the humanities) often fails to address a major shortcoming of the three-paper format. The introduction and conclusion end up being anachronous appendages that weary students…
  • the hunting ground and the university as organization

    Dan Hirschman
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:18 pm
    The Hunting Ground is a new documentary about the epidemic of sexual assaults on college campuses. It’s also a story of the birth of a new social movement targeting universities using innovative legal tactics alongside traditional organizing and protests. And in a gut-wrenching way, it’s a story about universities as organizations, and the dark side of the organizational imperative for self-protection and survival. In addition to being important for faculty to see in their roles as advisors, teachers, and participants in university governance, I think the film will also make an…
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    potlatch

  • The Happiness Industry - out in May

    Will
    2 Apr 2015 | 9:28 am
    For those blissfully absent from the twitter-sphere, I have a new book out in May (and since you're such twitter refuseniks, you're probably still neurologically capable of reading such things). It's called The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Wellbeing. It'll be available in most book-shops, and online via non-tax-dodging-bastard websites such as Housmans Online. I will be speaking about the book at a few events over the course and May and June, including one or two in the US. I'll stick the dates for these things, along with other articles…
  • the society of exit

    Will
    26 Mar 2015 | 3:50 am
    If death used to be a 'great career move' for rockstars - if only that were still the case - it is hard to escape the sense that being axed is now a 'great career move' for the mega-celebrities, who occupy the intermediary space between the secretive private jets of the billionaires and the spectacles of broadcast media and major sports. In the UK, Jonathan Ross and Kevin Pietersen are two examples of this. Jeremy Clarkson is clearly another. These individuals represent a particular class of celebrity: hugely rich, 'talented' in the sense of willing to 'be…
  • new article: from cigarettes to smartphones

    Will
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:16 am
    I have a new piece in openDemocracy, exploring cultural and economic transitions, via the shift from a society of cigarettes to one of smartphones. Here's a chunk: ...on a deeper psychological and cultural level, the difference between these two framing devices could scarcely be more profound. This touches on the malaise of anxiety that has become the dominant psychiatric disorder of our age. While smoking affirms the limits of time and space around us, smart phones do precisely the opposite. While one allows you to spend a finite chunk of time in a given space, as a break from the flux…
  • PERC Events

    Will
    13 Feb 2015 | 7:26 am
    In case I haven't already tweeted about it enough, I've been in the process of setting up a new Political Economy Research Centre (PERC) at Goldsmiths over the last few months, together with some great colleagues. PERC sits alongside our new heterodox PPE degree, which is currently in its first year. You can read about our research ambitions and interests on the website. Hopefully there will be projects and publications to follow. In the meantime, here are two events that are open to all (registration via Eventbrite links is required), both at Goldsmiths: 'From REcovery to…
  • Neoliberalism discussion on Novara

    Will
    3 Feb 2015 | 1:53 am
    Last week I was a guest on Novara FM, to discuss neoliberalism with Aaron Bastani. You can listen to the show here. In case that's not enough neoliberalism discussion, I gave a talk on a similar topic of 'what is neoliberalism?' at The Big Ideas last summer, which is available here.
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    orgtheory.net

  • teaching the sociology of sex to an intro soc class

    fabiorojas
    20 Apr 2015 | 5:01 pm
    One of the problems in teaching social theory a lot is that you constantly deal with people who hate the class. For most sociology majors, theory is irrelevant intellectual history that they don’t understand anyway. I still enjoy teaching theory, but I wanted a class that would directly appeal to students. I requested a section of social problems and decided to make a course about life course. But I didn’t advertise it as life course. Instead, it is called “MONEY SEX HEALTH HAPPINESS.” Yes – it is all caps in the course schedule! The way the course is built is…
  • sex and sociology

    fabiorojas
    19 Apr 2015 | 5:01 pm
    A lot of people in sociology study sexuality, but precious few study the act itself. Even less outside of sociology. This is unfortunate because sex should be very important to all of the social sciences. In my intro class (see tomorrow’s post), I have a section on the sociology of sex where I explain why sex should be of extreme importance to social science: No sex, no people. No people, no sociology. Sex is, for most people, an important factor in personal well being and life satisfaction. Sex affects health – people can contract STD’s from unsafe sex. Sex is associated…
  • ask the ages

    fabiorojas
    18 Apr 2015 | 5:01 pm
    50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street!!
  • sexy orgtheory

    fabiorojas
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Next week, we’ll discuss sex and sociology. Here are the topics: Why sex is important for sociologists to study My experience teaching social science research on sex Lessons from Laumann et al. (1994) Professional lessons from my first article on networks and STD’s The unexpected literature that sprung up from that article If you want to discuss other topics, mention them in the comments and we’ll work it in. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street!!
  • conference on the humanities and diffusion

    fabiorojas
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:01 pm
    I got the following announcement from Arizona State about a conference on humanities and movements, diffusion, and culture – “Transforming Contagion.” Interesting stuff for those interested in cultural studies, history, and American studies. Here’s the link and a clip from the announcement: Call for Papers Symposium: “Transforming Contagion” Location: Arizona State University’s West campus (Phoenix, AZ) Date: Friday, October 23, 2015 We invite proposals for an exciting and provocative symposium on the topic of Transforming Contagion.  This transdisciplinary and…
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Odd “Even”

    10 Apr 2015 | 7:03 pm
    April 10, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe “Mad Men” exhibit at the Museum of the Moving Image shows how scrupulously Matt Weiner and company sought historical authenticity. They are proud of their period-perfect props, objects that we will glimpse for a split second or not at all – the lunches in the office fridge, the driver’s license in Don Draper’s wallet. Why, then, does nobody check the script for linguistic anachronisms? I’ve noted some of these before (here). In this seventh and final season, “even” has popped up ahead of its time.  In an episode before the…
  • My Handshakes Bring All the Boys to the Yard

    6 Apr 2015 | 4:13 pm
    April 6, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonHandshakes are important. They can make a difference.After Kentucky lost to Wisconsin in the semis Saturday night, several of the Wildcats started off the court, skipping the handshake line.The Kentucky coaches managed to round up some of them, but three of the Kentucky stars shook no hands.*  That was now. But this Kentucky-handshake contretemps seems to be history repeating itself, albeit with some color reversal.In 1950, for post-season basketball, the NCAA had a close rival in the NIT. The “I” stands for “invitational,” and Kentucky,…
  • Cops – Killing and Being Killed

    3 Apr 2015 | 9:29 am
    April 3, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThis story from Kos has been quickly circling through the left portion of the Internet.Let’s assume that the numbers are accurate.* Don't bother adjusting for population differences, or poverty, or mental illness, or anything else. The sheer fact that American police kill TWICE as many people per month as police have killed in the modern history of the United Kingdom is sick, preposterous, and alarming.The author is right. Although the US has a much larger population, and it has more police officers . . .(Click on the graph for a larger view.). . .but…
  • Porn This Way

    31 Mar 2015 | 10:45 am
    March 31, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonIf you were gay and getting married, would you go out of your way to hire a homophobic photographer or baker? Would you seek out the florist who, as he delivers your flowers, lets you know that God despises you for your sinful and disgusting ways? Let’s get real. The uproar over the Indiana law is about something other than a relatively small number of gays prevented from boosting the bottom line of bigots. It’s about something more important – not the practical consequences but the symbolism.  What the law symbolizes is the relative status of…
  • Clogged Traffic at the Gateway

    26 Mar 2015 | 8:04 pm
    March 26, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonAll politicians lie, said I.F. Stone. But they don’t all lie as blatantly as Chris Christie did yesterday in repeating his vow not to legalize marijuana in New Jersey.Every bit of objective data we have tells us that it’s a gateway drug to other drugs.Maybe the governor was trying to show what a good Republican he is when it comes to the findings of science, because that statement simply is not true. The evidence on marijuana as a gateway drug is at best mixed, as the governor or any journalist interested in fact checking his speech could have…
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    Acta Sociologica

  • Book Review: Bourdieu and Data Analysis: Methodological Principles and Practice

    Flemmen, M.
    9 Apr 2015 | 11:19 pm
  • Inclusion ideals and inclusion problems: Parsons and Luhmann on religion and secularization

    Vanderstraeten, R.
    9 Apr 2015 | 11:19 pm
    This paper builds upon the theoretical work of Talcott Parsons and Niklas Luhmann and offers a critical reconstruction of their views on religion (Christianity) and secularization in the western world. It discusses the relation between the functional differentiation of modern society, the individualization of inclusion imperatives and the changing expectations regarding inclusion/exclusion in religious communication. From this perspective, it analyzes secularization in terms of perceived problems of inclusion in religious communication, and in terms of the reactions of Christian religions to…
  • Fast or slow food? Explaining trends in food-related time in the Netherlands, 1975-2005

    Mandemakers, J. J., Roeters, A.
    9 Apr 2015 | 11:19 pm
    The current study analysed trends in the time spent preparing and consuming food and the frequency of outsourcing (going out for dinner and take-out) in the Netherlands from 1975 to 2005. We investigated differences between trends on week and weekend days and for different socio-demographic groups. Analyses using pooled data from the Dutch Time Use Survey (N=13,421) revealed a downward trend in minutes preparing and consuming food and an increase in outsourcing. This overall downward trend could not be accounted for by controlling for structural changes (e.g. increased labour force…
  • Has education become more positional? Educational expansion and labour market outcomes, 1985-2007

    Bol, T.
    9 Apr 2015 | 11:19 pm
    Educational expansion has had important effects on society. However, it has not yet been acknowledged that expansion might have changed the way in which education operates in labour markets. We argue that, as a result of educational expansion, a positional model of education becomes more important whereby labour market rewards do not primarily depend on absolute skill levels, but instead on workers’ relative positions in the labour market. Analyzing data from the International Social Survey Programme from 1985 to 2007 for 28 countries, we find support for the claim that education has…
  • Women's housework decreases fertility: Evidence from a longitudinal study among Finnish couples

    Miettinen, A., Lainiala, L., Rotkirch, A.
    9 Apr 2015 | 11:19 pm
    Changes in the gendered divisions of domestic work are often assumed to influence couples’ childbearing behaviour, but existing evidence is mixed and mostly limited to cross-sectional data. We study how the amount and division of housework and childcare predict subsequent childbearing among Finnish couples using Finnish Time Use Survey 1999–2000 (FTUS1999) time diary data linked with register data on subsequent births. Results show that women’s housework hours were negatively associated with the likelihood of having children at all parities. Men’s contribution to…
 
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    Work, Employment & Society current issue

  • The importance of socio-spatial influences in shaping young people's employment aspirations: case study evidence from three British cities

    White, R. J., Green, A. E.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:45 am
    Over the last two decades a vibrant body of research committed to investigating the complex inter-relationships between ‘the social’ and ‘the spatial’ has gathered momentum within sociology and the social sciences more generally. Focusing on young people, this article seeks to develop further insights regarding the sociology of place using the spatial visualization technique of mental mapping as part of a mixed-methods approach. Its main contribution is to develop a more nuanced understanding of young people’s localized cognitive spaces and associated…
  • Re-engagement with the employee participation debate: beyond the case of contested and captured terrain

    Gollan, P. J., Xu, Y.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:45 am
    This e-special issue showcases employee participation research published in Work, Employment and Society over the last few decades. The editorial introduction provides an overarching review of the literature and also sets an agenda for future research. In particular, this article is concerned with the question of whether employee participation really brings employees increased voice and well-being, or whether it is simply an agenda that promotes the interests of employers. The article examines the evolution of employee participation and variation in its meanings and forms, and discusses…
  • Rethinking job satisfaction in care work: looking beyond the care debates

    Hebson, G., Rubery, J., Grimshaw, D.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:45 am
    Studies of care workers frequently reveal relatively high levels of job satisfaction despite poor employment conditions. The rewarding nature of care work, altruistic motivations and gendered social norms have all been used to explain why subjective job satisfaction is high despite poor pay and terms and conditions. Using data collected in case-study research with domiciliary and residential care workers, this article offers a new direction for care worker research that contextualizes the taken-for-granted assumption that care workers tolerate poor pay and conditions because women find the…
  • Book review: Rebecca Selberg, Femininity at Work: Gender, Labour and Changing Relations of Power in a Swedish Hospital

    Rollmann, H.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:45 am
  • Branding resources: extractive communities, industrial brandscapes and themed environments

    Scott, R., Bennett, E.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:45 am
    As the labour process is mechanized and Fordist social contracts between company and workers erode, extractive communities bear increased costs while receiving fewer benefits. The authors use two case studies to elucidate how processes that characterize post-industrial culture elsewhere are now transforming the working landscapes of rural mining and timbering communities. Companies draw on branding techniques familiar to other contexts to evoke markets where none exist, and to link production practices with particular forms of identity. These branding strategies at the site of production…
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Regnerus responds

    Philip N. Cohen
    17 Apr 2015 | 3:03 pm
    Photo by carnagenyc from Creative Commons. The news, reported in The Daily Texan, with documents ret
  • ON LEARNING — The Value Of Moving Against The Grain.

    Marissa K. Varcho
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:37 pm
    Reflection from November 28th, 2002 @ Age 21 RE:***BEING*** THE SUPER-EDUCATED, LIT-TLE RED CORVETTE ;0) My unhappiness.I think that is about the only thing that has run constant throughout my life thus far.I’m never happy with myself.Nothing is ever enough.I don’t want it to be like this but I don’t quite know how to change.Well, I mean I am starting out with the obvious, diet and exercise, or shall I say a better more healthy consumption of food…I am not dieting.I do not believe in that bullshit anymore because a quick fix is just that.Quick.It never lasts.But back to the…
  • Online Prostitution and the Idea of Establishing A Red Light District

    Oktofani
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Online prostitution has once again become a topic of discussion upon the recent news of the murder of Deudeuh Avisah Rini. The 25 year old was found dead in her boarding house in Tebet, South Jakarta, on Saturday (April 11). She’s reportedly a sex worker, who offers her service through social media platforms. [Continue reading]
  • Survival Continues Before it Informs

    Kimberly Nikole
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:45 pm
    People never think about one day they may have depression, they may have schizophrenia or they may bipolar. It’s not something to even bother thinking about at anytime.  Mental health issues only happen to the poor, the famous, the old, the rich, or to your neighbors.  They don’t happen to people themselves.  It was in a movie you saw on Net Flix last Sunday.  Children, teenagers, and most college students spend their time thinking they are immortal and nothing will happen to them. Actually, there are many adults that still believe that theory.   Your life is untouchable.
  • Social Geography: Be Resourceful

    LARRA_
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:50 am
    …is the branch of human geography that is most closely related to social theory in general and sociology in particular, dealing with the relation of social phenomena and its spatial components. Though the term itself has a tradition of more than 100 years,[1] there is no consensus on its explicit content.[2] In 1968, Anne Buttimer noted that “[w]ith some notable exceptions, (…) social geography can be considered a field created and cultivated by a number of individual scholars rather than an academic tradition built up within particular schools”.[3] Since then, despite…
 
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    Jonathan Rex

  • Lake Ida

    jrex365
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:03 am
    In the film Nymphomaniac by Lars Von Trier the main character continuously recalls her father talking about a specific tree that he loves a lot. He tells her that if people pay attention they will discover their tree eventually (or it will find them). Toward the end of the film she finds her’s . . . a crooked and solitary tree on a hill. It’s approaching two years now since I found my tree (header image) and the experience changed me forever. At the time I had been working at the Ft. Lauderdale courthouse in the Felony Department putting together dockets for the judges. I’d…
  • Ray Lamontagne

    jrex365
    3 Apr 2015 | 5:38 pm
    I stumbled across Ray’s music back in 2007 while in college when I saw this show on BBC and have been a fan ever since. If you’ve never heard of him you’re missing out. Do yourself a a favor, save the link to this post and when you have an hour free come back and hit play on the video below. Intro Three More Days Shelter Hold You In My Arms Be Here Now Empty Barfly Gone Away From Me Trouble Till The Sun Turns Black You Can Bring Me Flowers Jolene Can I Stay End    
  • Le Palais Idéal

    jrex365
    29 Mar 2015 | 6:41 pm
    Ferdinand Cheval was a French  postman who dedicated 33 years of his life toward building a castle out of stones that he collected and molded together with lime, mortar and cement. One day while delivering mail he tripped over a rock and recalled a dream that he had years earlier of himself building a palace with caves. Picking the rock up he put it in his pocket and set out to bring his dream to life. The end result was  Le Palais Idéal (The Ideal Palace) in Hauterives, France. He originally wanted to be buried inside his palace but that was illegal according to French law so he…
  • Aniyunwiya

    jrex365
    26 Mar 2015 | 10:06 pm
    The word Cherokee is actually an English variant of the word Tsala’gi (Cha-la-gee) and meant “Mountain People”. On some of the earliest European explorers’ maps of the U.S. the Spanish and French labeled the Cherokee lands as “Chalaqui” and “Chalaki”, names that they had gotten from surrounding tribes they encountered first. Other tribes referred to the Tsala’gi as the Rikama’gi (Rick-ama-gee) which meant “Mountain Water People”. In 1776 when Tsiyu Gansini (Dragging Canoe) formed the Tsikama’gi (Chickamauga) in…
  • Abstract Nudes

    jrex365
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:20 pm
    Earlier this week I began working on a new style of abstract nudes with a friend of ours. The idea that I have is to drip different colors of hot candle wax onto the model’s body in different patterns, shoot photos of her body and then edit the images later in Photoshop. I’m not sure if this is going anywhere yet. The concept that I began with will probably evolve over time through trial and error, but these are the first two images that I created with her.
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