Sociology

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  • Why Does Gender Matter in Sports?

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    1 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Sally Raskoff In 2009, I posted a blog about sex categories, intersex, sport, and cultural norms about identity. Has much changed since then? In professional sports, categorizing eligibility to compete as a female is based on testosterone levels. They have moved from typing genitals—are the ”right” parts there? To chromosomes—is she an XX? To hormone levels—are her testosterone or androgen levels in the appropriate range that signifies female? Is this an accurate way to assess someone’s sex? Are  these techniques adequate to signify sex? They certainly are not adequate…
  • Sept. 5: Science and sociology – and more letters to the ROB editor - The Globe and Mail (subscription)

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News
    4 Sep 2015 | 1:34 pm
    The Globe and Mail (subscription)Sept. 5: Science and sociology – and more letters to the ROB editorThe Globe and Mail (subscription)Science alone does not provide the recipe for sustainable development. Our experience demonstrates that respectful relationships with local communities are also essential. In Eeyou Istchee, science is not muddied by sociology – science and sociology
  • Black and White Understandings of Urban Uprising

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    3 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Aaron J. Howell Assistant Professor of Sociology SUNY-Farmingdale Racial politics have come to the forefront of political and social debates in the United States (U.S.) over the last year. The Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray (just to name a few) cases have caused many communities to rethink police-community relations and begin to have some honest conversations about race. These conversations have created some positive momentum. For example, the conversations are actually happening! Racial inequality has been a durable condition of U.S. society for its entire…
  • The textbook challenge: supporting literacy through technology

    Jisc blog
    g.ellis@jisc.ac.uk
    2 Sep 2015 | 3:58 am
    Literacy is arguably the most significant invention of all time, allowing us to live rich and varied lives and gain knowledge and experiences from the minds of others. Visiting Syria in 2009, a young man practicing his English on me said how appreciative he was to England for inventing the scouting movement. I reflected on that conversation for a long time afterwards, wishing I had had the quickness of wit to respond how grateful I was to his Mesopotamian ancestors for inventing literacy. International agency UNESCO has even sponsored an International Literacy Day since 1965, which this…
  • Response to the Book Review Symposium: Stefan Collini, What Are Universities For?

    SagePub: Sociology
    Collini, S.
    11 Aug 2015 | 3:07 am
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • Sept. 5: Science and sociology – and more letters to the ROB editor - The Globe and Mail (subscription)

    4 Sep 2015 | 1:34 pm
    The Globe and Mail (subscription)Sept. 5: Science and sociology – and more letters to the ROB editorThe Globe and Mail (subscription)Science alone does not provide the recipe for sustainable development. Our experience demonstrates that respectful relationships with local communities are also essential. In Eeyou Istchee, science is not muddied by sociology – science and sociology
  • Sociology department builds from ground up, focuses on race relations in St. Louis - Student Life

    2 Sep 2015 | 11:01 pm
    Sociology department builds from ground up, focuses on race relations in St. LouisStudent LifeAs hundreds of new students enter life at Washington University, an entire department of professors is learning the ins and outs of the University as well. The sociology department, re-formed this semester after a nearly 25-year hiatus, currently
  • WSSU sociology professor dies - Winston-Salem Journal

    1 Sep 2015 | 7:11 pm
    Winston-Salem JournalWSSU sociology professor diesWinston-Salem JournalLynn Harvey, a popular sociology professor at Winston-Salem State University, died unexpectedly Tuesday morning, WSSU officials said. Provost Brenda Allen sent an email to the campus community informing them of Harvey's death.
  • Equitable Growth grants awarded in economics, sociology - UC Berkeley

    1 Sep 2015 | 4:50 pm
    UC BerkeleyEquitable Growth grants awarded in economics, sociologyUC BerkeleyDaniel Schneider, an assistant professor of sociology, will spend the next year and a half exploring if rising inequality and economic insecurity are causing family insecurity and changing family structure, particularly childbirth outside of marriage
  • Jacob Lawrence's Existential Sociology - The American Conservative

    30 Aug 2015 | 9:45 pm
    Jacob Lawrence's Existential SociologyThe American ConservativeOr, worse, sociologists. And Jacob Lawrence's work does indeed have many reportorial or sociological characteristics: He's racially conscious (and self-conscious about his role as a voice of his race), he's influenced by folk art, he's panoramic in his
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Black and White Understandings of Urban Uprising

    W. W. Norton
    3 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Aaron J. Howell Assistant Professor of Sociology SUNY-Farmingdale Racial politics have come to the forefront of political and social debates in the United States (U.S.) over the last year. The Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray (just to name a few) cases have caused many communities to rethink police-community relations and begin to have some honest conversations about race. These conversations have created some positive momentum. For example, the conversations are actually happening! Racial inequality has been a durable condition of U.S. society for its entire…
  • Why Does Gender Matter in Sports?

    W. W. Norton
    1 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Sally Raskoff In 2009, I posted a blog about sex categories, intersex, sport, and cultural norms about identity. Has much changed since then? In professional sports, categorizing eligibility to compete as a female is based on testosterone levels. They have moved from typing genitals—are the ”right” parts there? To chromosomes—is she an XX? To hormone levels—are her testosterone or androgen levels in the appropriate range that signifies female? Is this an accurate way to assess someone’s sex? Are  these techniques adequate to signify sex? They certainly are not adequate…
  • The Horror of Race in the United States

    W. W. Norton
    28 Aug 2015 | 5:05 pm
    By Peter Kaufman I’m not a big fan of horror stories. I’ve never read Dracula, Frankenstein or even a Stephen King novel, and I don’t regularly watch movies full of chainsaws, ghostly figures, or creepy twins. But recently, I read a sociological horror story that I couldn’t put down. I was engrossed with it. It was beautifully written, painstakingly told, and depressingly disturbing.  Although it did offer details of death and destruction, these were not the scariest passages. What made this story so frightening and unsettling was the plain, unadulterated sociological truth it…
  • The Price of Partying

    W. W. Norton
    26 Aug 2015 | 4:28 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer Can partying give you a leg up after college? For most of us, probably not. But for well-connected, wealthy students, honing social skills and networking with similarly well-connected students provides advantages that few have access to. This is one of Elizabeth A. Armstrong and Laura T. Hamilton’s interesting findings in Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality. In their long-term study of students at a Midwestern state university, they found that for college women from well-to-do families with ample business connections, academic achievement—or even a…
  • The Ethics of Ethnography

    W. W. Norton
    13 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman When I was an undergrad, I was a political science major. I did not discover sociology until my junior year when I took a course titled Institutions and Inequalities. It was after taking this course that I knew that I was more interested in studying people than politics. What interested me most in this class were the books we were assigned. I still remember the intellectual excitement I felt when I read three classic accounts of how schools function to reproduce social-class inequality: Learning to Labor by Paul Willis, Ain’t No Makin’ It by Jay McLeod, and Learning…
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    Jisc blog

  • The textbook challenge: supporting literacy through technology

    g.ellis@jisc.ac.uk
    2 Sep 2015 | 3:58 am
    Literacy is arguably the most significant invention of all time, allowing us to live rich and varied lives and gain knowledge and experiences from the minds of others. Visiting Syria in 2009, a young man practicing his English on me said how appreciative he was to England for inventing the scouting movement. I reflected on that conversation for a long time afterwards, wishing I had had the quickness of wit to respond how grateful I was to his Mesopotamian ancestors for inventing literacy. International agency UNESCO has even sponsored an International Literacy Day since 1965, which this…
  • Building social engagement at your college or university

    g.ellis@jisc.ac.uk
    20 Aug 2015 | 7:32 am
    Last week we opened our call to find 50 of the most influential HE professionals on social media in the UK. But what consitututes good practice?  PodcastThis blog post is read in full in our accompanying podcast.Play audioIt wasn’t all that long ago that the notion of social media in education was somewhat frowned upon. A flash of Facebook’s familiar dark blue glow on a computer screen or the lighter blue of Twitter would immediately let off warning signs that attention wasn’t on the job at hand – far be it that these channels could actually be useful in the…
  • Open science: many hands make light work

    nathalie.carter@jisc.ac.uk
    14 Aug 2015 | 6:55 am
    Open science will be one of the priorities of the Dutch presidency of the European Union in 2016. As a concept, it’s a natural extension of the open access and open data policies which are already being embedded in UK science practice. Open access seeks to make the results of research generally available; open data promotes sharing and access to one of the key inputs to research.[#pullquote#]a natural extension of the open access and open data policies which are already being embedded in UK science practice[#endpullquote#]What is open science? And why support it?Open science promotes…
  • Building castles in the sky? Don’t bother - protect your king instead

    nathalie.carter@jisc.ac.uk
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:47 am
    Keeping your information secure can seem like a constant battle on all sides. Instead of trying to secure everything, I advocate adopting a strategy to allow what activities you can, and defend your most valuable information assets. PodcastListen to Andrew read this blog post in full in our accompanying podcast.Play audioMany moons ago, the model for information and digital security was a medieval castle. You kept your information, systems and networks protected like a fortress. Inside your digital fortress was ‘safe’; Out There, online, was ‘dangerous’. The modus…
  • Tell us who the most influential HE professionals on social media are

    g.ellis@jisc.ac.uk
    7 Aug 2015 | 3:58 am
    These days, social media is firmly embedded in the day-to-day activities of many higher education (HE) professionals as a way of improving practice and adding value. PodcastThis blog post is read in full in our accompanying podcast.Play audioI’m constantly astounded by the sheer wealth of examples from across the sector that I see in my job. Whether they are using social media for teaching purposes, to strengthen relationships with students, help research reach a wider audience, or in a myriad of other ways, HE professionals are getting more confident and increasingly creative with…
 
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Looking for articulations of basic rights

    Wretch729
    31 Aug 2015 | 12:22 pm
    I'm looking for examples of what a culture or social group has articulated as the basic rights owed to any person or at least any member of the culture/social group. The universality is the point here. Obvious examples include the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights or the United States' Declaration of Independence and Constitution/Bill of Rights. What other examples can you give me? It's a fuzzy line, but something like a medieval philosopher discoursing on equality before god (e.g. Galatians 3:26-29) is more what I'm interested in than say the Magna Carta, which is more a list of…
  • Whose idea was it to have an open bar at a lecture?

    Monochrome
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:13 pm
    I was watching a movie where a scene included an academic lecturing on her work. The event was a black tie affair and there was an open bar at the lecture. I suddenly realized that this is common in movies and I've actually been to something like that in real life. Why? Why do these events have a prominent bar? What's the rationale behind boozing up your audience? Is the bar an incentive to attend an otherwise dull presentation? Is a bar standard equipment for every black tie event? Is the presence of the bar an admission that adults need alcohol to function with strangers? If an open bar is…
  • Solid data on "messages received" increasing over time?

    Shepherd
    4 May 2015 | 2:33 pm
    I'm working on something with the sloppy premise that over the gradual shift from print to digital, communications isn't a zero-sum game. The general idea is that the introduction of things like first the Internet and e-mail, and later social media and texting, have increased the total number of messages people receive, and that people are increasingly "messaged at" over time. What sources can help me prove this, or disprove it? It feels like a common-sensey assumption, but might just be "truthy" (or even just wrong). It seems like something that should be quantifiable, as one can count…
  • Examples of norms that prohibit costly behavior and emerge informally?

    mrmanvir
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:43 am
    hivemind!!!! Does anyone know of any cases where a norm informally or organically arises that prohibits a behavior that is costly to others (i.e., has negative externalities) or demands that individuals do something to reduce costs for others? Examples that come to mind are norms against smoking and norms demanding that people cover their mouths when they sneeze. It would be especially great if anyone also knew of some literature about the emergence of the norm, especially in the form of academic articles, though stuff from newspapers, magazines, etc. would be rad too. Thanks!
  • Examples of under-enforced rules, laws, taboos, norms?

    mrmanvir
    4 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
    Hivemind! Does anyone know any examples of rules, regulations, laws, or norms that are under-enforced (e.g., violations go unpunished), leading the rule to completely destabilize (i.e., no one follows it)? I'm sure that there are A LOT of examples of this - stuff from any and all disciplines and scales would be welcome. I'm preferentially searching for unconventional examples (e.g., rules of children's games, supernaturally-sanctioned laws of hunter-gatherer bands) and I'm also looking especially for primary literature (e.g., experiments, case studies, etc.), but ultimately anything would be…
 
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    Uncommon Thought Journal

  • The Privatization of Water in India: How Coca-Cola Destroys the Aquifer

    Rowan Wolf
    5 Sep 2015 | 7:21 am
    By Amit Srivastava[Graphic by DonkeyHotey, (CC – Attrib..]Following a series of disastrous failures in India, one of Coca-Cola’s most important markets, the company is desperate to rebuild its reputation by claiming ‘water neutrality’. But the idea is absurd, writes Amit Srivastava, and does nothing to benefit the communities that suffer from the depleted aquifers it pumps from.The Coca-Cola company is planning to announce that it is close to replenishing all the water it uses“back to communities and nature” by the end of 2015, well ahead of schedule. It will take more than…
  • Say Goodbye to the Holocene Epoch

    wolf-wan
    4 Sep 2015 | 12:41 am
    By xraymike79[Graphic: Banksy]Mankind’s exothermic machine of industrial civilization recently blew past the 400ppm CO2 mile post, causing a few passengers to exclaim, “Homo sapiens have never existed at these levels of heat-trapping gases!” Hundreds and even thousands of years will pass before the full aftermath from our fossil fuel orgy plays out, but we’ll see plenty of nasty surprises in feedback loops and tipping points this century, perhaps most notably sea level rise. Another area of glaciers once thought to be stable has fallen to the human CO2 spike which is…
  • The Realpolitik of Revolution

    Rowan Wolf
    3 Sep 2015 | 7:22 am
    By William T. Hathaway[Photo via US Air Force. Graphic via RT on 65 anniversary of NATO.]What will it take to end this ghastly cycle of violence and bring lasting peace, not just end this current war but create a peaceful society in which humanity lives cooperatively and harmoniously? The socialist answer is we must overthrow capitalism, a system that inevitably generates conflict and inequality. And overthrowing it will require a revolution.What will it take to make a revolution? The socialist answer is the majority of people must realize that capitalism can’t provide them a decent…
  • Self-Plagiarism and the Politics of Character Assassination: the Case of Zygmunt Bauman

    Rowan Wolf
    2 Sep 2015 | 7:00 am
    By Brad Evans and Henry A. GirouxIn a recent study published in the Times Higher Education supplement, the world-renowned sociologist Zygmunt Bauman was charged with repetitive counts of “self-plagiarism”. As Peter Walsh and David Lehmann of Cambridge University claimed to have discovered, following an alleged meticulous reading of some 29 of Bauman’s works, “substantial quantities of material that appear to have been copied near-verbatim and without acknowledgement from at least one of the other books sampled. Several books contain very substantial quantities of text – running into…
  • Shifting Priorities: The Rise and Fall of Arab Revolutionary Discourse

    Rowan Wolf
    1 Sep 2015 | 7:55 am
    By Ramzy BaroudStrange how  intellectual discussion concerning the so-called “Arab Spring” has almost entirely shifted in recent years – from one concerning freedom, justice, democracy and rights in general, into a political wrangle between various antagonist camps.The people, who revolted across various Arab countries are now marginalized in this discussion, and are only used as fodders – killers and victims – in a war seemingly without end.But how did it all go so wrong?There was once a time when things were so simple, so easy to understand and explain: People, who were long…
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    scatterplot

  • the $7bn myth: isis and the antiquities black market

    Dan Hirschman
    1 Sep 2015 | 8:15 am
    The following is a guest post by Fiona Rose-Greenland. Last week the FBI posted a new bulletin warning American citizens to be careful when purchasing antiquities of Iraqi or Syrian origin. The risk, according to the FBI, is that “purchasing an object looted and/or sold by the Islamic State may provide financial support to a terrorist organization and could be prosecuted under 18 USC 233A.” Media outlets responded with a new round of articles, resurrecting the specter of a “$7 billion black market in antiquities”, in which the Islamic State (IS) is apparently making a killing. In some…
  • screwance

    jeremy
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:10 am
    Kieran Healy has written a paper about nuance and posted it here.  It’s an argument that resonates with my own experience, especially in terms of various forays of reading efforts of social theory to talk about the relationship between what they are doing and psychology or, worse, “biology.” While there’s various colorful language throughout the paper, this unadorned sentence hit home for me in that regard: there is a desire to equate calling for a more sophisticated approach to a theoretical problem with actually providing one, and to tie such calls to the alleged…
  • the place of reproducible research

    mike3550
    18 Aug 2015 | 1:11 pm
    The ongoing scuffles over reproducible (or is it replicable? or robust?) research always seems to miss one point particularly important to my own work: protecting geographic identities of respondents. I do not wish to argue that we should not replicate or share data. Rather, I wish to suggest that the costs of data sharing are not as low as many make them out to be and that a one-size-fits all policy on reproducible research seems unwise. For those who don’t know, I study how people’s health differs across neighborhoods and how they decide where to move (among other things). Both…
  • is parenthood really worse than divorce? demographic clickbait in the washington post

    Dan Hirschman
    13 Aug 2015 | 11:22 am
    The following is a guest post by Aaron Major. If you’ve seen, or heard about, the Washington Post piece on having a baby being worse than death, read on. Lots of these science/social science articles come across my feed and while most of them bug me in various ways, this one has prompted me to write. Maybe it’s because I’ve got good friends who just had their first baby and, while they’re too tired and blurry-eyed to spend much time on the Facebook these days, I cringe thinking about this stuff becoming part of the many ‘having a baby’ conversations that they, and lots of folks,…
  • in (partial) defense of cultural dopes

    Dan Hirschman
    12 Aug 2015 | 8:57 am
    The following is a guest post by Jeff Guhin. John O’Brien has an important new article at Sociological Theory about individualism that everybody should read. It uses a brilliant and incredibly well-handled meta-analytical technique: by combining 17 qualitative studies of religion in America (including his own), he’s able to use others’ data but not take their conclusions for granted. Of course, he’s limited by what ended up in the field notes and then, more importantly, what made it from the notes to the pages, but he still does a lot of his own interpretation. In fact, watching…
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    orgtheory.net

  • more tweets, more votes: social media and causation

    fabiorojas
    3 Sep 2015 | 5:02 pm
    This week, the group Political Bots wrote the following tweet and cited More Tweets, More Votes in support: why do politicians buy bots? "statistically significant association" more tweets more votes U.S. House by @fabiorojas http://t.co/gS6FjEN9Ig — politicalbots.org (@polbots) September 2, 2015 The claim, I believe, is that politicians purchase bots (automated spamming Twitter accounts) because they believe that more presence on media leads to a higher vote tally. In presenting these results, we were very careful to avoid saying that there is a causal relationship between…
  • asr review guidelines

    epopp
    3 Sep 2015 | 1:09 am
    In a totally commendable attempt to broaden the range of methods represented in ASR, the new editorial team is working to develop guidelines for reviewers of papers using ethnographic and interview methods, theory papers, and comparative-historical papers. The idea is that if reviewers, especially those who don’t write such papers themselves, are given a more explicit sense of what a “good” article in one of these areas looks like, they will be less likely to dismiss them on grounds borrowed inappropriately from another type of research. Jenn Lena posted links on Twitter…
  • orgtheory’s greatest hits

    fabiorojas
    2 Sep 2015 | 5:01 pm
    What are the most commented on posts in the blog’s history? According to WordPress, they are: The critical realism affair. Technically, Kieran’s critical realism post only got 122 comments, but taken together, the three CR posts got about 160 comments. That was the hardest blogging I ever loved. Should I stop teaching post-modernism? (144 comments) Elizabeth Berman’s inequality in the skies. (101 comments) GRE scores are valid. Sorry, guys. (99 comments). You know who in Texas. (74 comments) Brayden and Eszter’s book on online reputation. (74 comments) How I pick grad…
  • is black lives matter a social movement?

    fabiorojas
    1 Sep 2015 | 5:01 pm
    People often ask if a political group is a “movement.” In what sense is Occupy Wall Street or Black Lives Matter a movement? In the social sciences, protest movements are often defined by the following: A collective action (not a single person, or a group of people acting at once by coincidence) Aimed at structural change in society Using contentious or non-institutionalized means. Then, yes, Occupy and Black Lives Matter (and the Tea Party and many others) are clearly protest movements. BLM is, I think, mainly defined by a desire to see a complete overhaul of how police interact…
  • general tso’s chicken

    fabiorojas
    31 Aug 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Netflix is running a documentary called The Search for General Tso, which is about the origin of a dish called “General Tso’s Chicken.” As you might imagine, the documentary starts with some obvious humor. Folks back in China have never heard of it, so the viewer believes that it is a fake “American Chinese” dish. The story turns out to be richer than that. I won’t give away the details, but the film is an excellent overview of Chinese immigration and the role that Chinese restaurants have in helping migrants: Chinese restaurants were given…
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Pigskin Preview (i.e., Football Cliches)

    2 Sep 2015 | 7:28 am
    September 2, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe previous post was about the University of Illinois football coach forcing injured players to go out on the field even at the risk of turning those injuries into lifelong debilitating and career-ending injuries. The coach and the athletic director both stayed on script and insisted that they put the health and well-being of the scholar athletes “above all else.” Right.My point was that blaming individuals was a distraction and that the view of players as “disposable bodies” (as one player tweeted) was part of a system rather than the moral…
  • Coach and Economy

    31 Aug 2015 | 8:46 am
    August 31, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe Illinois football head coach, Tim Beckman, was just fired after a ton of evidence showed that he forced Fighting Illini scholar-athletes to play hurt. [A] player, Simon Cvijanovic, alleged that Beckman and his staff pushed the athlete into playing with an injured shoulder and knee and lied to him about how long his recovery would take. He said that the coaching staff frequently berated injured players, threatening to take away their scholarships if they did not return to practice quickly after an injury.Cvijanovic tweeted that athletic medical staff…
  • There’s a Place for Us

    29 Aug 2015 | 1:24 pm
    August 29, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe Metropolitan Opera’s Summer HD Festival offers free screenings of operas in the large plaza at Lincoln Center- a different opera each night. Tonight it’s Carmen, and the operas to come are nearly as well known – La Traviata, Don Giovanni, Tales of Hoffman, etc. For the opener last night the Met chose West Side Story – the 1961 movie. The great irony is that we were sitting in what had been the setting for the story – a neighborhood known as San Juan Hill. Back then it was a “slum”; today it would be called a low-income, predominantly…
  • Charlie Parker

    29 Aug 2015 | 11:06 am
    August 29, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonHe died in 1955 at age 34. He would have been 95 today.I’m sure that there is much sociological to be said about Bird and birth of bebop. As Howie Becker has taught us, art is collective enterprise. That’s especially true of jazz, and Becker’s ideas about art in general originated in his own experiences working as a jazz pianist. But individual artists are important, and Charlie Parker remains one of the great figures in American music.  “Man, you gotta go up to Minton’s and hear the way this cat plays ‘Cherokee,’” musicians would…
  • Killing Gun Legislation

    27 Aug 2015 | 3:29 pm
    August 27, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonWhen it comes to passing law,s do the gunslingers always win?The father of one of the victims and the governor of the state have called for stricter gun laws. I’m sure they are sincere, but it all seems so familiar, part of usual post-massacre minuet.  The stylized and mannered sequence of steps: We need stronger gun laws. Now is a time for prayer not politics. Gun-death rates in the US are several times higher than in other countries. Second Amendment. And so on. Laws are proposed. Then the gun manufacturers and their minions (NRA, et al.) get…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Fuck Nuance

    31 Aug 2015 | 11:15 am
    About nine months ago, my colleague Steve Vaisey told me he was interested in organizing a session at the American Sociological Association Meetings about the idea of “nuance” in sociological theory, and in particular about how there seemed to be a lot of demand for the stuff. He asked me if I’d be interested in submitting a paper called something like “Against Nuance”. I replied that if you were going to do something like that, you should just go ahead and call it “Fuck Nuance” and be done with it. “OK then”, said Steve, “I’ll…
  • Sex Gaps by Cohort in New Zealand Electoral Constituencies

    31 Jul 2015 | 4:19 am
    The other day, Jonathan Marshall posted a nice graphic showing population age profiles of electoral constituencies in New Zealand, ordered by their tendency to vote left or right. He put the data on github, and on a long transatlantic flight yesterday I ended up messing around with it a bit. Almost the only bit of Demography I know is the old saw that women get sicker but men die quicker. So I thought I’d take a look at differences in the sex composition of age cohorts by constituency. The idea would be that there should be a lot more females in the upper age cohorts, and perhaps more…
  • Apple Sales Trends Q2 2015

    21 Jul 2015 | 11:48 pm
    In an effort to not lose all of my lucrative Consulting Thinkfluanalyst income to the snowman, I redrew my LOESS and LTS decompositions of Apple’s quarterly sales data by product. They now extend to Q2 2015. First, here’s a plot of the trends showing the individual sales figures with a LOESS smoother fitted to them. Figure 1. Quarterly sales data for Apple Macs, iPhones, and iPads. Here’s the Mac by itself, which continues to grow healthily (unlike the rest of the PC industry), just on a smaller scale than other Apple products. Figure 2. Quarterly sales data for Apple Macs.
  • Sleeping Beauties in Philosophy

    27 Jun 2015 | 4:11 am
    The other day at Daily Nous, Justin asked about so-called “Sleeping Beauty” papers in Philosophy: “Sleeping Beauty” papers “lie dormant for years before experiencing a sudden spike in citations as they are discovered and recognized as important.” A recent article in Nature discussed scientific papers that have slumbered for decades … Are there sleeping beauty papers in philosophy? (I mean, of course, besides that paper of yours from a few years back that no one has cited…yet.) Which have slumbered the longest? Who was their “prince”? I’ve been doing some…
  • America's Ur-Choropleths

    12 Jun 2015 | 6:50 am
    Choropleth maps of the United States are everywhere these days, showing various distributions geographically. They’re visually appealing and can be very effective, but then again not always. They’re vulnerable to a few problems. In the U.S. case, the fact that states and counties vary widely in size and population means that they can be a bit misleading. And they make it easy to present a geographical distribution to insinuate an explanation. Together the results can be frustrating. Gabriel Rossman remarked to me a while ago that most choropleth maps of the U.S. for whatever…
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    Acta Sociologica

  • Book Review: The Killing Fields of Inequality

    Kallio, J.
    14 Aug 2015 | 12:45 am
  • Anomie, marketization, and prejudice toward purportedly unprofitable groups: Elaborating a theoretical approach on anomie-driven prejudices

    Hovermann, A., Messner, S. F., Zick, A.
    14 Aug 2015 | 12:45 am
    This paper discusses systematically different concepts of anomie as an explanation of Group-focused Enmity (GFE) against selected groups in society. The GFE research programme has demonstrated the utility of applying the concept of ‘anomia’ – an individual reaction to disruptions in the normative order – to explain prejudices against vulnerable groups. This paper extends the GFE research programme by incorporating insights from Institutional Anomie Theory, a theoretical perspective originally introduced in the criminological literature. Drawing upon this, it develops a…
  • Book Review: The Limits of Social Science. Causal Explanation and Value Relevance

    Ylikoski, P.
    14 Aug 2015 | 12:45 am
  • Reciprocity as a trigger of social cooperation in contemporary immigration societies?

    Manatschal, A.
    14 Aug 2015 | 12:45 am
    While the system stabilizing function of reciprocity is widely acknowledged, much less attention has been paid to the argument that reciprocity might initiate social cooperation in the first place. This paper tests Gouldner’s early assumption that reciprocity may act as a ‘starting mechanism’ of social cooperation in consolidating societies. The empirical test scenario builds on unequal civic engagement between immigrants and nationals, as this engagement gap can be read as a lack of social cooperation in consolidating immigration societies. Empirical analyses using survey…
  • Explaining differences in the strength of squatters' movements in western European cities: A comparative analysis

    Guzman-Concha, C.
    14 Aug 2015 | 12:45 am
    Squatters occupy and restore empty buildings to establish self-managed social centres, where they put in practice alternative ways of living while engaging in various protest campaigns. Episodes of squatters’ activism have occurred in many European cities, including the ‘occupy’ movement and the demonstrations against austerity measures in several countries. Despite this trajectory, there is little comparative research on squatters’ movements. This article addresses this gap by examining the determinants of the strength of squatters’ movements in Western Europe…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Be Less Tolerant

    Rambling Rob
    5 Sep 2015 | 8:08 am
    In today’s world, having an open mind and being universally tolerant are viewed as the epitome of an enlightened individual. Unfortunately, universal tolerance is impossible for civilized society and is a ruse used to cover up the fear of offending one another. While it is very possible to avoid being intolerant, being completely tolerant is not something one should desire to achieve. To be intolerant is to be “unwilling to accept views, beliefs, or behaviors differing from your own.” Clearly, intolerance is something to be avoided unless you want to become an ignorant bigot. In…
  • It's so Wonderful It's Horrible

    halsmith
    5 Sep 2015 | 6:48 am
    At no time have we been more aware of these two extremes – wonderful and horrible. Advertising has used the first so much, it is now struggling to find different ways of saying the same thing. Usually it falls back on images, usually attractive young women. who show us how wonderful a product or service is. People have no trouble getting the message – and they are not annoyed by this blatant appeal to sexuality – as they should be. This is part of the reason it’s so horrible. Advertisers can manipulate our minds anyway they want – and we are not annoyed, but…
  • Anthropology in Climate Change

    Emil Morhardt
    5 Sep 2015 | 5:00 am
    by Yijing Zhang Barnes (2013) strongly suggests that natural scientists cannot solve the climate issue alone even if they have understood every scientific aspect of it. Therefore, anthropologists can further enrich the study of climate change in three ways, particularly when the climate debate involves social, cultural and political topics. The first way to improve the climate study is to apply ethnographic insights. Instead of focusing on one specific community, Barnes argues that the climate change requires a broader perspective. Extending subjects from local places to international…
  • What I Learned In Japan

    bobreuschlein
    5 Sep 2015 | 4:22 am
    Overview This year is the seventieth anniversary of the atomic bomb, which was used in war the first time against the Japanese city of Hiroshima by US President Harry Truman.  Two of the conferences in Hiroshima associated with this anniversary are COSGA (about sociology and globalization) and the new PSYSUS (about psychology and sustainability).  Having made submissions to both, I discovered I had been elevated to one of three Featured Speakers, an important milestone in my career.  These joint conferences were held in August 24-27 at the KKR Hotel Hiroshima.  Hiroshima today is a major…
  • The Lonely Tribalist: Origins... With a Vengeance

    Moose and Michelle
    4 Sep 2015 | 6:00 pm
    I vaguely promised that I would provide an explanation for the title of this blog, The Lonely Tribal
 
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    Well Written Documents

  • Ancient Text The Epic of Gilgamesh is Surprisingly Scandalous & Sordid

    Charlene Rossell
    23 Aug 2015 | 6:00 pm
    An Ancient Text with a Jerry Springer Style Plot An ancient text can help us better understand the history of the world.  Questions about how people lived, why they married and even basic things like what they ate can be … Continue reading →
  • Writing eBooks & Kindle Worlds: Glamorous, Enticing & oh, so Hollywood

    Hope Benefield
    9 Jul 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Fan Fiction, I love you XOXO –Gossip Girl Have you ever wondered what Gossip Girl would have said if Chuck and Blaire’s on-again-off-again relationship went down in flames with a disastrous wedding-day rather than the much expected happily-ever-after? When you … Continue reading →
  • Illiteracy in Alameda County… (Quiet as It’s Kept)

    Charlene Rossell
    14 Jun 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Illiteracy as a State of Being Burdened by illiteracy, an elderly man enters a primary school because he was denied a basic education as a child in the movie called The First Grader.  Now, in his late years, he receives … Continue reading →
  • Fictional Writer, Carrie Bradshaw, on The Pen Versus Love

    Charlene Rossell
    23 May 2014 | 8:00 am
    Writing About Love is a Universal Effort Every great writer, fictional writer or a real-life professional writer, has tried his or her hand at writing about love at one point or another. It has become a topic that stands as an epic abstract … Continue reading →
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    Jonathan Rex

  • Adrianne Chalepah

    jrex365
    19 Aug 2015 | 2:16 am
    Adrianne Chalepah, a 29 year old Kiowa/Apache comedian, formed the “Ladies of Native Comedy” group in an attempt to bring Native female voices to mainstream America. When I asked her about her motivations she said, “I feel like Native female entertainers are largely overlooked. Our voice is one that’s inaudible to mass America. I’m trying to give us a louder voice because we deserve it. We’ve carried generations of traumatized victims of genocide on our backs and survived it all because of several different things – but one of our tools is humor. We…
  • Ray Young Bear

    jrex365
    2 Aug 2015 | 12:11 pm
    Ray Young Bear, a Meshkwahkihaki (People of the Red Earth) poet and novelist, sent me an e-mail  a couple days ago to let me know that he’s having a new poem published in the New Yorker tomorrow (August 3 – 2015). Born and raised in Iowa Ray spoke Meskwaki as his first language and began writing poetry early on, publishing his first poem in English in 1968. His writing focuses a great deal on the cognitive dissonance felt by many Native Americans today who are being pulled in different directions culturally. Finding it easier to express himself and accurately convey the…
  • Welcome To Krakow

    jrex365
    17 May 2015 | 11:11 am
    On May 1st I moved from Delray Beach in Florida to Krakow, Poland. Fell in love with this city. If you’ve never been here definitely put it on your bucket list of places to see during your life. Just avoid girls with umbrellas who invite you into Strip Clubs and you won’t regret your trip here. Or, if you do go along with them make sure to pay with cash and you won’t return home to discover an enormous bill.
  • Chaim Machlev

    jrex365
    7 May 2015 | 4:29 am
    Chaim Machlev is a tattoo artist based in Berlin who works by individual appointments only.  I came across his tattoos a while back when I was living in the United States. Now that I’m living in Europe it’s definitely on my to-do list to meet up with him to do my first tattoo.
  • Ray Lamontagne

    jrex365
    3 Apr 2015 | 5:38 pm
    I stumbled across Ray’s music back in 2007 while in college when I saw this show on BBC and have been a fan ever since. If you’ve never heard of him you’re missing out. Do yourself a a favor, save the link to this post and when you have an hour free come back and hit play on the video below. Intro Three More Days Shelter Hold You In My Arms Be Here Now Empty Barfly Gone Away From Me Trouble Till The Sun Turns Black You Can Bring Me Flowers Jolene Can I Stay End    
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