Sociology

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  • The Sociology of “Zombie Ants”

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Shawn Van Valkenburgh Sociology PhD student, UC Santa Barbara When Oscar Wilde wrote that “Life imitates Art,” he was playfully subverting  conventional wisdom about nature that dates back to at least the time of Aristotle, and continues to shape our unstated assumptions about the world.  We usually think about art as a human meditation about a “real world” that is separate from people. This has its corollary in our epistemologyor the way that we come up with knowledge about the world. As members of a scientific culture, we tend to think of epistemology as a process of…
  • How often are unauthorized immigrant workers trafficked and abused?

    eScienceNews: Sociology
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:18 am
    Labor trafficking -- or recruiting a person for labor through force, fraud, or coercion for involuntary servitude, debt bondage, or even slavery -- has been a difficult problem to track among undocumented migrant workers. With unique access to a "hidden population" from one of America's largest Spanish-speaking immigrant destinations, a recent study finds that more than 30% of undocumented migrant laborers in this area are victims of labor trafficking and 55% are victims of other labor abuses. read more
  • Sociology students offer solutions for poverty

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    22 Apr 2014 | 8:08 pm
    FRANKLKIN Twp. -- There are fewer people at or below the poverty level in Ellwood City than the state average, but that doesn't mean poverty isn't an issue that should be addressed.
  • Learning From Korea’s Disaster

    NYT > Sociology
    18 Apr 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Few great catastrophes have one single explanation.
  • Lane Kenworthy on America's social democratic future

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    23 Apr 2014 | 11:38 am
    Sociology and political science professor Lane Kenworthy explains the ideas in his newest book, "Social Democratic America" at the University of Minnesota Humphrey School. He says the US faces three core economic problems: ecomomic insecurity, disparities in economy opportunity based on class and income, and a lack of shared prosperity. Despite bad economic forces, Kenworthy says he is ...
 
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    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Lane Kenworthy on America's social democratic future

    23 Apr 2014 | 11:38 am
    Sociology and political science professor Lane Kenworthy explains the ideas in his newest book, "Social Democratic America" at the University of Minnesota Humphrey School. He says the US faces three core economic problems: ecomomic insecurity, disparities in economy opportunity based on class and income, and a lack of shared prosperity. Despite bad economic forces, Kenworthy says he is ...
  • Sociology students offer solutions for poverty

    22 Apr 2014 | 8:08 pm
    FRANKLKIN Twp. -- There are fewer people at or below the poverty level in Ellwood City than the state average, but that doesn't mean poverty isn't an issue that should be addressed.
  • Georgia College Releases State Of The State Poll

    22 Apr 2014 | 6:05 pm
    The Georgia College Department of Government and Sociology has released the first edition of Georgia's State of the State Poll. The results focus on key issues facing the state and information about political leaders.
  • State of the state: Majority of Georgians support harbor deepening

    22 Apr 2014 | 10:37 am
    The Georgia College Department of Government and Sociology has released the first edition of Georgia's State of the State Poll. Conducted during February, the results focus on key issues facing the state and information about political leaders.
  • Curriculum Leader for Psychology/Sociology

    21 Apr 2014 | 6:13 am
    This is a fantastic opportunity for a talented, ambitious professional to lead a popular subject area within our outstanding school (OFSTED 2011). It is an exceptional opportunity to promote excellence in learning and achievement and to gain experience to progress to a more senior leadership position.
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • The Sociology of “Zombie Ants”

    W. W. Norton
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Shawn Van Valkenburgh Sociology PhD student, UC Santa Barbara When Oscar Wilde wrote that “Life imitates Art,” he was playfully subverting  conventional wisdom about nature that dates back to at least the time of Aristotle, and continues to shape our unstated assumptions about the world.  We usually think about art as a human meditation about a “real world” that is separate from people. This has its corollary in our epistemologyor the way that we come up with knowledge about the world. As members of a scientific culture, we tend to think of epistemology as a process of…
  • Alcohol and the Social Construction of Social Problems

    W. W. Norton
    21 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer What do we know about the problems associated with alcohol, and how do we know it? For many people, the first thing that comes to mind is that alcohol is a mainly problem of teens and college students. How do we know this? For one, we are taught at early ages about the dangers of teen drinking. Many universities include alcohol safety awareness as part of orientation programs. And we frequently hear stories in the news about young people who drink and drive or otherwise cause problems while drinking. Researchers study the incidence of teen drinking, often funded by the…
  • Social Media: Windows, Mirrors and Bubbles

    W. W. Norton
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Jonathan Wynn If you are anything like me, you have engaged in a heated Facebook exchange once or twice. Recently I’ve had two interesting chats with old friends—one of whom I’ve lost touch with for over two decades who has political views on the complete other side of the spectrum than me. Rather than a reminder of how technology connects people from far afield, both exchanges reminded me of just how rare it is for me to bridge wide social distances. Where do you get to interact with people who are different from you? We imagine a time when an open public square was where a…
  • Dispatch from a Professional Sociology Conference

    W. W. Norton
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Sally Raskoff Oh, the anticipation of a professional meeting! As Im walking into to the airport to fly away to the conference, I think of all the times I have done this. I found sociology in 1981 and it quickly became my major. Its been twenty years since Ive been out of grad school and Ive been teaching full time--and going to conferences--ever since. My first meeting was in the late 1980s in Las Vegas. That first meeting, I gave my first conference presentation. It was terrible. (My presentation, not the meeting.) I was terrified and practiced my talk over and over. Then when the time…
  • The State of the Dinner

    W. W. Norton
    4 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Teja Pristavec Sociology Graduate Student, Rutgers University This February, President Obama sat down for dinner with his visiting French colleague, President François Hollande. In the company of the First Lady, other government officials, and some celebrities, the men enjoyed an appetizer of Illinois caviar, Pennsylvania quail eggs, and twelve varieties of American-grown potatoes. The main dish was a Colorado beef steak with mushrooms, Vermont cheese and salad, followed by a dessert of Hawaiian chocolate cake, Florida tangerines, and Pennsylvania vanilla ice-cream. Three types of wine…
 
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Do homeless individuals have codes of conduct or rules?

    mrmanvir
    19 Apr 2014 | 4:28 pm
    I recently learned that the panhandlers in my city (Cambridge, MA) often share their food when they get big items and it made me wonder - do homeless individuals often have explicit or implicit rules, like "share when you get food" or "the person who's been homeless the longest gets the best spot"? What do you think happens if people break the rule? I'm sure there's a lot of variation both within and between cities, but if anyone has any thoughts, I'd really appreciate it!
  • Theory about Internet and judging personal probabilities already exist?

    WCityMike
    28 Mar 2014 | 4:37 pm
    I have an original pet theory I came up with a long time ago involving the Internet and how people judge probability. It probably would fall into the anthropological, sociological or psychological fields. I'm not intending to make this post to discuss the theory itself as a sort of "let's b.s. back and forth about my idea" kind of thing. Reason I'm posting is because I'd like to know if this theory already exists or is an application of something broader that already exists. Maybe it's a theory being applied onto the communications medium of the Internet of some older theory in one of the…
  • Sociological or anthropological studies on insular or peninsular cities?

    Mo Nickels
    26 Mar 2014 | 12:29 pm
    I'm looking for academic-level writing on the ways that cities that are built on islands or peninsulas, or in geographically isolated areas, develop and behave differently from cities that are more easily and fully connected to other cities. This would be about the mindset and attitudes and not about urban planning or infrastructure. I'm thinking these may be anthropological or sociological studies. They may even just be a thought pieces or essays. I could swear I saw one that talked about Manhattan and Charleston, but I can't find it.
  • Sociology of Tumblr

    lhude sing cuccu
    9 Jan 2014 | 4:32 pm
    Where can I find online (preferably informal) articles or blog posts about the sociology of Tumblr, like this one? I've been venturing deep into what's known as "social justice tumblr," and I find it very interesting as a subculture. It's mostly activists for minority-of-the-minority rights, such as transgender people and asexuals. For example, the link above leads to a blog post about the "call-out culture" of tumblr (publicly reblogging a post and calling the original poster out on "ignorance" or "bigotry," usually in a very direct and impolite way): "Call out culture might, at times,…
  • Seeking Obscure Subculture Fiction

    Xalf
    6 Jan 2014 | 7:56 am
    Please recommend fiction about obscure subcultures. Basically, I'm looking for the fiction version of this question. More contemporary books (written recently and about contemporary subjects) are preferred but not required.
 
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • Opening address to Botswana Manual Workers' Union

    23 Apr 2014 | 5:11 am
    PninaWerbner, Professor Emerita of Social Anthropology, School of Sociology and Criminology, gave the official opening speech to the 41st annual delegates conference of the NALCGPWU (The Manual Workers Union) in Gaborone, the capital of Botswana.    She delivered her address in front of 1,500 union delegates and distinguished guests, including the leader of the opposition party, Botswana Congress Party, and long-time leader of the Ruling Party, the Botswana Democratic Party, as well as other public sector union leaders.Her speech focused on the glaring inequalities in Botswana…
  • Digital Sociology at the British Sociology Association Conference 2014

    22 Apr 2014 | 5:03 am
    By Emma Head As co-convenor of the BSA Digital Sociology study group, I've helped to organise a special session on digital methods and their implications for sociology.  More details of our inaugural conference session can are outlined below, do join us if you are at the BSA conference this year: 'The Social Life of  (Digital) Methods: roundtable discussion', Conference Auditorium 2, Friday 25th, 5-6pmThis roundtable discussion explores digital methods and their implications for sociological research.  The following speakers will be taking part:  Susan…
  • Career Building for Sociology and Criminology Students

    31 Mar 2014 | 5:32 am
    Earlier this month a group of alumni in Sociology and Criminology returned to Keele for an event in Keele Hall and KUSU, to provide career-building advice and support to more than 30 current undergraduates.Students in all years of Sociology or Criminology benefited from a full day of career planning, including sessions to build their networking skills, which they later put into action with our alumni visitors.  A wide range of routes were represented by our alumni group, who work in housing, charity PR, project management, community safety, crime prevention and probation, policing and in…
  • The saga of TV Licence evasion: are we finally ready to decriminalise?

    25 Mar 2014 | 4:10 am
    By Adam Snow, PhD student in Criminology Proposals have been put forward for TV licence fee evasion to be decriminalised. Originally the proposal was to completely decriminalise the system, now amendments have been accepted that give the power to Ministers to decriminalise at a date in the future should they see fit.The first thing to say about this change is that in all likelihood decriminalisation will be unlikely for a significant period.  The BBC itself welcomed the changes from outright immediate decriminalisation and stressed the need to take into account the BBC's review…
  • Governing the International Family

    19 Feb 2014 | 1:07 am
    by Ala Sirriyeh, Lecturer in SociologyA few days after Valentines Day, I stood in the supermarket queue contemplating who might be so confident as to buy a reduced priced Valentine's Day card from the display for next year. Coming straight after Christmas and New Year, some people find themselves faced with a gauntlet of public celebrations that centre heavily on the themes of family and love. Even if they share my sentiments on such over-commercialised over-sentimentalised events, it must be difficult for those who have to endure these days while living apart from their partner or…
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    orgtheory.net

  • is org theory out of touch with sociology?

    brayden king
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:05 am
    Recently I was talking to a statistician in a business school and he mentioned that he’d seen my paper about the Matthew effect and status bias in baseball. He said that he knew I was a sociologist as soon as he saw the title of our paper. “All sociologists study status and the Matthew effect right?”  He asked me why sociologists care so much about status. The answer I gave him was that sociology as a discipline is very focused on explaining inequality – its antecedents and consequences – and status is one important manifestation of inequality. We have many…
  • most academic papers are not cited and that’s ok

    fabiorojas
    23 Apr 2014 | 5:01 pm
    A classic result in the social analysis of science is that most papers are poorly cited. For example, the classic deSolla Price paper in Science (1965) found that the modal citation count in his sample was zero. Low mean and modal citation counts remain the standard in contemporary studies of scientific behavior. So, what gives? Scientific research is a type of creative pursuit. By definition, journal articles are supposed to report on what is new or novel. Once you buy that, the low citation rates in science make sense. First, creativity (or importance) is a scarce commodity. Anyone trained…
  • the effects of slavery on economic performance

    fabiorojas
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Nathan Nunn has a paper in the Quarterly Journal of Economics estimating the effect of slavery on long term growth: Can part of Africa’s current underdevelopment be explained by its slave trades? To explore this question, I use data from shipping records and historical documents reporting slave ethnicities to construct estimates of the number of slaves exported from each country during Africa’s slave trades. I find a robust negative relationship between the number of slaves exported from a country and current economic performance. To better understand if the relationship is causal, I…
  • book review: black against empire by joshua bloom and waldo martin

    fabiorojas
    21 Apr 2014 | 5:15 pm
    The American Historical Review published my book review of Black Against Empire by Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin. BAE is the first book that gives a comprehensive account of the Black Panther Party. Oddly, nobody had ever sat down and just wrote the blow-by-blow history of the Panthers: For the first time, one can read, in a single volume, a well-researched history that explains the origins of the Panthers in the context of Oakland neighborhood politics and the group’s transformation into a social service organization. For that reason alone, the book will become a classic in the…
  • charismatic organizations: the case of alcoholics anonymous

    fabiorojas
    20 Apr 2014 | 5:01 pm
    The media covered a new book by Lance Dodes called The Sober Truth. In the book, Dodes surveys the evidence on rehab and finds that there is literally no evidence that rehab, AA or other popular methods for kicking drugs are effective. From a recent Alternet article: Peer-reviewed studies peg the success rate of AA somewhere between 5 and 10 percent. That is, about one of every fifteen people who enter these programs is able to become and stay sober. In 2006, one of the most prestigious scientific research organizations in the world, the Cochrane Collaboration, conducted a review of the many…
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Reach Out

    23 Apr 2014 | 8:22 am
    April 23, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonAn article about a bread recipe in the Times today (here) has this sentence:This recipe runs 38 pages in the cookbook “Tartine Bread”; when I began to I began to streamline it into the version you see here, I reached out to Mr. Robertson. What struck me wasn’t the 38 pages.  (“Making the dough is also a two-day process. Resist the temptation to rush any of the steps” – assured me that I would definitely not be making this bread.) It was “reached out.” We don’t call people, we don’t write to them, we don’t try to get in touch…
  • Know Your Sample

    22 Apr 2014 | 6:35 pm
    April 22, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonTim Huelskamp is a Congressman representing the Kansas first district. He’s a conservative Republican, and a pugnacious one (or is that a redundancy). Civility, at least in his tweets, is not his long suit. He refers to “King Obama” and invariably refers to the Affordable Care Act as “ObamaScare.” Pretty clever, huh?He’s also not a very careful reader.  Either that or he does not understand the first thing about sampling. Tonight he tweeted.(Click on a graphic for a larger view.)Since polls also show that Americans support gay marriage, I…
  • Never Apologize, Never Explain

    19 Apr 2014 | 8:08 am
    April 19, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonIn their research on celebrity apologies, Karen Cerulo and Janet Ruane found that the most effective apologies are simple admissions of fault. “I did it. It was wrong. I won’t do it again.”  Forget about excuses, explanations, and denials.  Yesterday’s post gave two recent examples – an effective apology (James Franco), and a less effective denial (Jenny McCarthy).  Unfortunately, Cerulo and Ruane did not include those celebrities who simply ignored the reported misdeeds, celebrities who followed the advice of John Wayne in “She…
  • Sorry ’Bout That

    18 Apr 2014 | 2:54 pm
    April 18, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWere celebrity apologies much in the news this past week or so? Or is it just that Karen Cerulo’s talk at our AKD evening turned my antennae to pick up more of them?The morning after Karen’s talk, James Franco was on “Kelly and Michael” talking about his too-well publicized Instagram exchange with a 17-year old girl he was trying to pick up.  Franco got it right:I’m embarrassed.  guess I’m just a model about how social media’s tricky. It’s a way people meet each other today, but what I’ve learned is you don’t know who’s on…
  • Polarization in Small Groups and in Politics

    13 Apr 2014 | 4:47 pm
    April 13, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonIn class last week, I tried replicating the “risky shift” experiments that date back to the 1950s. Groups discussed problems that pitted caution against risk. For example, down by three points on the last play of a football game, should you kick a field goal and settle for a tie, or try a play that might win but also risks a loss?* In the original studies, not only were group decisions riskier than individual decisions, but discussion persuaded more people towards risk than towards caution.Later research showed that the risky shift was one instance of…
 
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    chris uggen's weblog

  • Barney Kessel on Record Store Day

    19 Apr 2014 | 3:56 pm
    Oh sure, it is much easier to get your music online. And it is much cheaper to obtain it via "sharing," to borrow the kids' charming euphemism, rather than "paying." But neither experience can match the unexpected delight of holding a treasured obscurity in a real record store. And if said obscurity remains in good condition, it can fill your home with a sound that warms and glows like an actual log on an actual fire. On this national record store day, I hunted for a romantic big-guitar Barney Kessel album to take the damp chill from the air. A fitting choice, it turns out, given Mr.
  • Buzzo on Chemicals and Creativity

    2 Mar 2014 | 12:39 pm
    A promising student recently told me that s/he found drugs and alcohol "necessary" to do really creative work. "That's bovine excrement," I explained (though a bit more emphatically and not exactly in those words). Elaborating, I suggested that any short-run benefits to such a strategy quickly morph into much larger long-run liabilities. Plus, there are far healthier ways to address the underlying problems that the chemicals purport to solve -- try running or blogging, for example, if you want to overcome inhibitions, anxiety, or writer's block. I'm not sure whether my li'l lecture got…
  • Screens for Glass Houses

    22 Feb 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Social media feeds are like carnival money booths: we snatch away greedily as the links swirl past, but we're rarely enriched by the experience. In the rush to process so much so quickly, we've become lousy filters for one another – recommending “great articles” that ain't so great by social science standards.  Many rapidly-circulating stories offer grand assertions but paltry evidence about the social world. It seems silly to direct much intellectual horsepower at every li'l item whooshing past (why, that Upworthy post needs an interrupted time-series design!). So people seem…
  • Productive Addicts and Harm Reduction

    5 Feb 2014 | 6:33 pm
    In the wake of Philip Seymour Hoffman's sad death, many are calling for various "harm reduction" approaches to substance use. Proponents of harm reduction have identified lots of ways to reduce the social and personal costs of drugs, but they often require us to shift our focus from the prevention of drug use itself to the prevention of harm. Resistance to such approaches often hinges on the notion that they somehow tolerate, facilitate, or even subsidize risky behavior.This tension emerged clearly in my new article with Sarah Shannon in Social Problems. We…
  • We Are All Criminals

    5 Nov 2013 | 2:15 pm
    Few (if any) of us have abstained from crime completely. And recognizing our own criminality is often an important first step in understanding the situation of those who are caught and punished for crimes. I use self-report delinquency surveys to show this commonality to my students, but the traveling exhibit We Are All Criminals makes the point far more emphatically. The multimedia project tells our stories -- the millions of people who have committed felonies and misdemeanors but managed to avoid the stigma of a criminal record. Its architect is Emily Baxter, a visionary Minnesota…
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    European Sociological Review

  • Deciding under Doubt: A Theory of Risk Aversion, Time Discounting Preferences, and Educational Decision-making

    Breen, R., van de Werfhorst, H. G., Jaeger, M. M.
    7 Apr 2014 | 11:16 pm
    We develop a rational choice model of educational decision-making in which the utility of educational choices depends on students’ risk aversion and their time discounting preferences. We argue for the role of risk aversion and time discounting preferences in the choice of different tracks in secondary education and in mediating the impact of socioeconomic background on such choices. Enrolment decisions in Danish secondary education provide our empirical example, and the results are generally in line with the proposed theory in that (i) risk aversion deters students from choosing the…
  • European Sociological Review - Editorial

    7 Apr 2014 | 11:16 pm
  • Previous School Results and Social Background: Compensation and Imperfect Information in Educational Transitions

    Bernardi, F., Boado, H.-C.
    7 Apr 2014 | 11:16 pm
    In this article, we analyse whether previous school results have a social background-specific impact on a student’s decision to continue in schooling. We refer to the model proposed by Breen and Goldthorpe (1997) and scrutinize the theoretical underpinnings of the interaction between previous school performance and educational choices. We provide two sets of predictions. First, a compensatory effect might occur if inequality is greater among the worst-performing students than among others. In this case, students from socio-economically advantaged backgrounds with poor school results…
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    7 Apr 2014 | 11:16 pm
  • A Macro-Sociological Study into the Changes in the Popularity of Domestic, European, and American Pop Music in Western Countries

    Bekhuis, H., Lubbers, M., Ultee, W.
    7 Apr 2014 | 11:16 pm
    Relying on the top 100 pop songs from year-end charts, we coded more than 30,000 chart positions based on the country of origin of the artist and the language of performance, in nine Western countries. We estimated cross-national differences and trends since 1973, testing expectations on globalization as has been reviewed in the literature, where Americanization/Westernization, diversification, nationalization, and glocalization have been distinguished. Since the late 1980s, there has been an upward trend in the popularity of domestic artists, both when they perform in English or in their…
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    Acta Sociologica

  • Book Review: What's Love Got to Do with It?

    Bloch, C.
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:54 am
  • Late-modern hipsters: New tendencies in popular culture

    Schiermer, B.
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:54 am
    The article deals with the cultural significance of a new figure in late-modern Western culture: the hipster. The current hipster culture, so I argue, can be used as a magnifying glass that makes impending changes to our conception of culture and of cultural development visible. It ushers in broader cultural and social changes: different relations among generations, new ways of relating to technology and media, new ways of being together, and new phenomenologies and sensibilities. After a first outline of the figure of the hipster, I mark out two salient traits to hipster culture: its…
  • The gender gap in the business elite: Stability and change in characteristics of Swedish top wage earners in large private companies, 1993-2007

    Bihagen, E., Nermo, M., Stern, C.
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:54 am
    Using unique Swedish register data on all employees in large private companies, we study trends in the gender composition of top wage employees from 1993 to 2007. The analyses reveal that the likelihood of women holding top wage positions has more than doubled since the early 1990s, but men are still markedly over-represented in this group of employees. We focus on educational choices, considering level and field of study as well as university attended. One important conclusion is that, although education is important in reaching a top wage position, field of education and university attended…
  • Relative worth of a bachelor degree: Patterns of labour market integration among drop-outs and graduates in sequential and integrated tertiary education systems

    Matković, T., Kogan, I.
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:54 am
    This article considers the implications of sequential segmentation in the tertiary education set-up for stratification of labour market outcomes among university drop-outs and graduates. Building on signalling, queuing, credentialist and human capital framework, we articulate theoretical expectations about labour market entry patterns for tertiary education graduates and drop-outs emerging from two distinct types of tertiary education institutional set-up: integrated (diploma) and sequential (bachelor-master) systems. In particular, we explore whether bachelor graduates from sequentially…
  • Do fixed-term and temporary agency workers feel socially excluded? Labour market integration and social well-being in Germany

    Gundert, S., Hohendanner, C.
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:54 am
    In this study we examine how employment insecurity affects social exclusion using data from the German panel study PASS. Assuming that secure employment is an important condition for the subjective feeling of social affiliation, we compare unemployed individuals and those in fixed-term, temporary agency or permanent employment. Applying hybrid random effects regression models we find that temporary workers feel less affiliated to society than permanent workers. This finding cannot be fully explained by economic and social resources or job status. We discuss alternative mechanisms, such as…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • First Learnings – Reading Margaret Mead

    tiwarisac
    21 Apr 2014 | 9:09 pm
    Margaret Mead, 1901-1978 (Image courtesy HiloBrow blog) Anthropology from late 1940s to 1960s serves a useful starting point to understand how the growing breed of sociologists and anthropologists encountered experiences, people and cultures strikingly different from those which they came from. This could be true in any century, rather more so when the first Portuguese sailors arrived at the western coast of India or when the Dutch merchants disembarked on the eastern coast of India. But the post WW II period is particularly interesting and perhaps the phase when anthropology as a discipline…
  • Chart of the day II: American oligarchical curve

    richardbrenneman
    21 Apr 2014 | 9:02 pm
    From International Social Survey Programme data, complied by Larry Bartels of the Washington Post for an article headlined “U.S. is a World Leader in Class Conflict Over Government Spending”:
  • CBC Doc Zone - Relevant and informative topics

    lucytone
    21 Apr 2014 | 7:44 pm
    CBC Doc Zone – Making documentaries that are important to our society 1) Generation Boomerang, 45 minutes, Dreamfilm Productions for CBC. Directed by Sharon Bartlett & Maria LeRose. How are 20 and 30 year olds living, at their parents home around the world? Informative: *****, Standard form **** Watch it here: http://www.cbc.ca/player/Shows/Shows/Doc+Zone/ID/2167363287/ A search into my own situation led me to watch CBC Doczone’s Generation Boomerang. Feeling uncertain about my decision to move back home, I researched this topic and was delighted to see that I’m not…
  • Is God Real?

    nickshamhart
    21 Apr 2014 | 5:09 pm
    April 21, 2014 The question is not, nor has it ever been, “Is God real?” This may seem like an issue of semantics, but trust me, it isn’t. God is the question of reality. What is real? Our minds’ interactions with our five senses dictate what we, as humans, perceive as real. We are the only species on our planet to build churches, mosques, shrines, and other such complexities to our God or gods. Ants may herd aphids. Dolphins and apes may have recognition of self. But, despite these complexities, none of those animals have a structured dogma. If they practice a faith…
  • Statistically Speaking

    The Rural Iowegian
    21 Apr 2014 | 5:06 pm
    A post on another site showed when residents of different states had worked enough for the year to pay their state and national membership dues (taxes). Some people including one incessant jack wad, claimed that that does not show which state was best. I agreed that there were many tangible and intangible factors that go into quality of life so I took the state rankings for education, healthcare, road systems, taxes (income and sales), and cost of living into effect and came up with these results rated from best to worst: State Rank Tennessee 1 Virginia 2 New Hampshire 3 Wisconsin 4 Georgia 5…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Small business owners not always worried about being treated fairly, researcher finds

    24 Apr 2014 | 10:35 am
    Fairness is not always the most important priority for small retailers. In an international study, University of Missouri researchers found that some small retailers are less concerned about whether they are treated fairly by business suppliers than other factors, such as cash flow and company survival. read more
  • Princeton release: Not just the poor live hand-to-mouth

    23 Apr 2014 | 3:14 pm
    When the economy hits the skids, government stimulus checks to the poor sometimes follow. read more
  • Research shows impact of Facebook unfriending

    23 Apr 2014 | 10:23 am
    Two studies from the University of Colorado Denver are shedding new light on the most common type of `friend' to be unfriended on Facebook and their emotional responses to it. read more
  • How often are unauthorized immigrant workers trafficked and abused?

    22 Apr 2014 | 10:18 am
    Labor trafficking -- or recruiting a person for labor through force, fraud, or coercion for involuntary servitude, debt bondage, or even slavery -- has been a difficult problem to track among undocumented migrant workers. With unique access to a "hidden population" from one of America's largest Spanish-speaking immigrant destinations, a recent study finds that more than 30% of undocumented migrant laborers in this area are victims of labor trafficking and 55% are victims of other labor abuses. read more
  • Religious music brings benefit to seniors' mental health

    20 Apr 2014 | 10:41 am
    A new article published online in The Gerontologist reports that among older Christians, listening to religious music is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and increases in life satisfaction, self-esteem, and sense of control over their lives. In particular, listening to gospel music is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and an increase in sense of control. read more
 
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    Acceptable Confusion - Opinion

  • April 18th, 2014

    18 Apr 2014 | 9:15 am
    Gay Marriage for You, Gay Marriage for Me This is something truly fascinating. This is something quite absurd, shocking and powerful all at once. It is an act of hypocrisy, of double-standards and an unethical like-for-unlike swap. How could this have happened so quickly? Millennia of palatable religious doctrinal intolerance subverted and quashed in the wink of a cripplingly- mascaraed eyelash. Following years of struggle against injustice, inequality and sheer ignorance, man and man, woman and woman are now permitted, condoned, accepted – whatever verb you wish to apply to this…
  • April 11th, 2014

    11 Apr 2014 | 7:54 am
    For Love, Not Money When one visits Japan, one of the most memorable take-outs – and there are many – is the undeniably extreme level of service one experiences, almost universally, when travelling, shopping, eating or even just crossing the street. This high-value service proposition, underlines much of inner workings of the Japanese society, the reluctance to say ‘no’, combined with the ever present ‘tatemai’ – the public face one wears, whilst outside and interacting with society – combine superbly well for a pleasurable, Teflon-coated…
  • April 04th, 2014

    4 Apr 2014 | 10:43 am
    Smoke Screen E-cigarettes seem to present a largely innocuous and healthy alternative to the obvious risks of antiquated tobacco smoking. While full testing of the health advantages and disadvantages of E-cigarettes or ‘vaping’, as it is otherwise known (due to the vapour inhaling of liquefied nicotine) are not yet fully concluded, the product would, on the surface, appear to help smokers reduce or even cut out completely their use of tobacco and its well-documented health risks. This is a good thing. This is a very good thing. Patches, gum, lozenges and even the old-fashioned…
  • March 28th, 2014

    28 Mar 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Culturalism I have a slight confession to make and admittedly, it may seem a little strange to some. I however, consider it somewhat of a personal cultural enlightenment. Lately, I have found myself appreciating, perhaps even considering with a sense of romantic affection, the adornment generally known as the Hijab. Much like a figure-hugging dress, golden flowing locks, or that smile, I have started to become aware of the much nuanced sex-appeal of the frequently chastised traditional Muslim headwear. Steering clear of any religious debate over personal freedoms or more significant forms of…
  • March 21st, 2014

    21 Mar 2014 | 10:02 am
    Las Bicicletas Norman Foster, the renowned architect responsible for iconic masterpieces such as the ‘Gherkin’ and the new Wembley Stadium in London, amongst many others around the globe, recently announced his vision for a new mass-transit system for the UK capital. With continued rejuvenation and uptake of cycling in the west, Foster, who is himself a keen cyclist, has proposed what may appear to some as a Jetson-esque view for the future of transport. Foster has envisaged a new elevated cycle route dubbed the ‘SkyCycle’, to be built over large tracts of rail and…
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