Sociology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Why were people so scared of "juvenile delinquents" in the 1950s?

    Metafilter: Sociology
    suburbanbeatnik
    20 Sep 2014 | 1:23 am
    I've been fascinated with 1950s-1960s stuff for a long time, and for just as long I've accepted that people back then were fascinated with evil, misbehaving youth, and indeed thought that "JDs" were a Huge Problem in Society (i.e. West Side Story, Blackboard Jungle, or Rebel Without A Cause). Yet it also seems people were genuinely terrified of Teens Gone Bad, in a way it's hard to wrap my modern brain around. But how did this come about? Why were so people scared of "juvenile delinquents," and why was this considered a societal problem on par with battling Communism? I started looking around…
  • Sociology Professor Offers Voice for Those With Alzheimer's Disease - College of the Holy Cross (blog)

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News
    19 Dec 2014 | 4:26 pm
    College of the Holy Cross (blog)Sociology Professor Offers Voice for Those With Alzheimer's DiseaseCollege of the Holy Cross (blog)Associate professor of sociology, Renée Beard, can trace back her initial interest in Alzheimer's disease to when she was fourteen years old. Working as a housecleaner in a nursing home in a small New Hampshire town, she met Margarita Wheeler, ...
  • Study to seek ways to for privacy from cameras

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    19 Dec 2014 | 1:09 am
    Two Indiana University professors and a Dartmouth College sociology professor have been awarded a $1.2 million grant to try to improve the privacy of people captured by wearable cameras.
  • Police Misconduct as a Social Problem

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:49 am
    By Sally Raskoff Are you angry about the legal system’s decisions about the cases in which have police killed unarmed black boys or men? Or are you angry that people are angry about that? It is not clear whether the rates of unarmed black man being killed by police are increasing, but we are seeing more media coverage when it happens. It’s about time. Is this a problem of individuals? Yes, on the one hand. It’s a problem for them personally if it happens to them or someone in their life. But it’s also a problem for society. One of the key tenets in sociology is that the personal…
  • Book Review: Loretta Baldassar and Laura Merla (eds), Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care: Understanding Mobility and Absence in Family Life

    SagePub: Sociology
    Dunne, N.
    5 Dec 2014 | 3:17 am
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • Sociology Professor Offers Voice for Those With Alzheimer's Disease - College of the Holy Cross (blog)

    19 Dec 2014 | 4:26 pm
    College of the Holy Cross (blog)Sociology Professor Offers Voice for Those With Alzheimer's DiseaseCollege of the Holy Cross (blog)Associate professor of sociology, Renée Beard, can trace back her initial interest in Alzheimer's disease to when she was fourteen years old. Working as a housecleaner in a nursing home in a small New Hampshire town, she met Margarita Wheeler, ...
  • Sociology students, professor win top awards - The Oshkosh Northwestern

    19 Dec 2014 | 8:15 am
    Sociology students, professor win top awardsThe Oshkosh NorthwesternJacqueline Clark, associate professor of sociology and chair of the department, was awarded the Hans O. Mauksch Outstanding Teaching Award from WSA. This award acknowledges and honors outstanding contributions to the teaching of sociology.
  • The Sociology of Annoying Xmas Songs - Huffington Post

    16 Dec 2014 | 11:14 am
    The Sociology of Annoying Xmas SongsHuffington PostWhy do some of the most annoying Xmas songs keep coming back year after year after year? To find answers to this question, one could do worse than study Wham!'s musical masterpiece "Last Christmas." It is virtually impossible to leave the house without ...and more »
  • Sociology students' trip to observe 'working class culture' at Millwall FC - Telegraph.co.uk

    10 Dec 2014 | 4:33 am
    Telegraph.co.ukSociology students' trip to observe 'working class culture' at Millwall FCTelegraph.co.uk“From the college's point of view, and as a sociology student, I understand them using the trip to try to explain some sociological terms but I do feel that 'women challenging gender norms' is unfair as women have been attending football games since
  • The sociology behind the events in Ferguson - Webster Journal

    10 Dec 2014 | 3:48 am
    The sociology behind the events in FergusonWebster JournalRiot gear, constant focus on looting and heightened security in St. Louis. Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology Remy Cross and Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology Andrea Miller help explain to their students the events
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Study to seek ways to for privacy from cameras

    19 Dec 2014 | 1:09 am
    Two Indiana University professors and a Dartmouth College sociology professor have been awarded a $1.2 million grant to try to improve the privacy of people captured by wearable cameras.
  • Miley Cyrus College Course to Be Offered in New York

    15 Dec 2014 | 2:50 pm
    The Skidmore College summer sociology class will study the race, class and gender discussions surrounding the pop star. read more        
  • Here’s hoping the sociologists didn’t choke on their half-time Bovril

    13 Dec 2014 | 3:49 pm
    LAST Friday was a very special occasion for some sociology students from Brighton, a rare privilege. Too often the subject is an arid and colourless discourse, a procession of competing theories — Marxian and, of course, those to the left of Marx — learnt from a textbook.
  • Martin Riesebrodt, Sociologist of Religion, 1948-2014

    11 Dec 2014 | 9:21 am
    Riesebrodt, professor emeritus of the sociology of religion in the Divinity School and Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago, died Dec. 6 of cancer in Berlin. He was 66.
  • College offers football trip to learn about working class

    11 Dec 2014 | 8:21 am
    Fans of English football team Millwall reacted angrily on Thursday after a school invited students to attend one of their matches and "even talk" to fans to learn about working class stereotypes on sexuality and race. Varndean College in Brighton promises its sociology students that they will see examples of "hyper-masculinity, hegemonic masculinity, women challenging gender norms and working ...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Police Misconduct as a Social Problem

    W. W. Norton
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:49 am
    By Sally Raskoff Are you angry about the legal system’s decisions about the cases in which have police killed unarmed black boys or men? Or are you angry that people are angry about that? It is not clear whether the rates of unarmed black man being killed by police are increasing, but we are seeing more media coverage when it happens. It’s about time. Is this a problem of individuals? Yes, on the one hand. It’s a problem for them personally if it happens to them or someone in their life. But it’s also a problem for society. One of the key tenets in sociology is that the personal…
  • (Someone Else’s) Home for the Holidays: The Difficulty of Defining the Situation

    W. W. Norton
    8 Dec 2014 | 12:30 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer As I recently blogged about, necessity led me to stay at a room in someone’s home I found on a peer-to-peer travel website. I had never done so before, and considered the experience a sort of brief ethnography. Overall, I found the experience strange, and something I’d probably do again only as a last resort. Neither purely guests or customers, the difficulty of defining the situation left us wondering exactly how to act in this new experience. My husband and I stayed in a room in a private home and arrived while the homeowner had company. We felt like we were…
  • The Social Nature of Personal Choices

    W. W. Norton
    3 Dec 2014 | 10:07 am
    By Peter Kaufman Did you know that you could do more to reverse climate change by becoming a vegetarian than by driving a hybrid car such as a Prius? Apparently, it’s true. According to researchers at the University of Chicago, the amount of fossil fuels it takes to produce a meat-based diet is so great that if you want to reduce your carbon footprint you are better off cutting livestock out of your diet than by driving a fuel-efficient automobile. Other researchers have come to similar conclusions, finding that “plant-based diets in comparison to diets rich in animal products are more…
  • (Someone Else’s) Home for the Holidays

    W. W. Norton
    24 Nov 2014 | 1:34 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer I just booked my first reservation through Airbnb.com, the site where you can reserve a room in a guest house or private home. This wasn’t my first choice; after finding that most reasonably-priced hotel rooms were booked, my husband and I decided to give it a try for a night. We passed on places that had too many negative reviews left by previous guests or if the room seemed unkempt and cluttered based on the posted pictures. The location we selected had many good reviews and is a five minute drive from our destination. Staying in a stranger’s home may seem like a…
  • Community Engagement: Who is Best Served by Service Learning?

    W. W. Norton
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales Community-engagement. This is a term that is used quite a bit amongst college and university presidents, administrators, faculty, staff, and students in thinking about ways that colleges and universities can bridge the town-gown divide between university campuses and the towns, neighborhoods, and/or cities in which they reside. At the same time, it’s a hot topic given the Obama administration and the Department of Education’s support for initiatives surrounding community and civic-engagement and learning. Some colleges view community-engagement as a form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    SagePub: Sociology

  • Book Review: Loretta Baldassar and Laura Merla (eds), Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care: Understanding Mobility and Absence in Family Life

    Dunne, N.
    5 Dec 2014 | 3:17 am
  • Sociology and Neoliberalism: A Missing History

    Gane, N.
    5 Dec 2014 | 3:17 am
    This article argues that neoliberal thought initially positioned itself in relation to classical sociology by developing an economic epistemology in response, on one hand, to Max Weber’s methodological writings, and, on the other, to the positivist sociology of figures such as Auguste Comte. These points of contact between early sociological and neoliberalism are addressed in detail in order to consider the challenges that the latter poses to sociological thought. It is argued that because the neoliberal project developed out of an epistemological and political critique of classical…
  • Dual Book Review Symposium: Michael Billig, Learn to Write Badly: How to Succeed in the Social Sciences

    Jones, H.
    5 Dec 2014 | 3:17 am
  • We Need to Talk about Race

    Harries, B.
    5 Dec 2014 | 3:17 am
    It is not easy to name racism in a context in which race is almost entirely denied. Despite a recent focus on the ‘silencing’ of race at a macro level, little has been done to explore the effects of living with these processes, including how they might be resisted. Drawing from a study with 20–30 year olds in Manchester, this article addresses this gap. It examines how respondents disavow racism they experience when to do so is counter-intuitively understood to be associated with being racist or intolerant. These narratives demand that we ask the question, why is racism…
  • Living Apart Relationships in Contemporary Europe: Accounts of Togetherness and Apartness

    Stoilova, M., Roseneil, S., Crowhurst, I., Hellesund, T., Santos, A. C.
    5 Dec 2014 | 3:17 am
    Drawing on a European cross-national biographical-narrative study of intimate life, this article discusses the complexity of experiences of ‘togetherness’ and ‘apartness’ amongst people in living apart relationships. We explore the five main ways in which interviewees spoke about and understood their current living apart relationships (as: chosen; temporary; transitional; undecided; and unrecognisable), which we argue shows the need for a broader conceptualisation of this form of intimate relationship than is suggested by the established notion of ‘living apart…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Does a bloodied face signify the end of a fist fight?

    BleachBypass
    7 Dec 2014 | 2:21 pm
    I am trying to find some confirmation (or refutation) of the idea that at least in some contexts (schoolyard fisticuffs and other low-stakes, non-lethal brawls) the bloodying of one combatant's face is a kind of an "okay, the fight is over, we have a winner, everyone go home" signal. I feel like I've read this idea before - that it satisfies something primal and archetypal about a violent confrontation - mostly when the violence is status-driven, as opposed to, say, a violent crime where the stakes might be higher and the outcomes more dire. In Facing Violence, Rory Miller talks about how…
  • Can you find the lecture about doxxing and vigilantes?

    Monochrome
    31 Oct 2014 | 12:09 pm
    Circa 2010 I saw a video of a talk on dangers of twitter and hacktivism. The man giving this presentation gave an example of a tweet that angered hacktivists. One of them doxxed the twitter user and found out his/her address. A flash mob of angry people showed up at the doorstep. But the wrong address had been used. Then someone died (the homeowner? someone in the crowd? I can't recall.) The speaker emphasized that this scenario was fictional, but its constituent phenomena are real. He said it was only a matter of time before it came true. Does anyone have a link to this video?
  • Why were people so scared of "juvenile delinquents" in the 1950s?

    suburbanbeatnik
    20 Sep 2014 | 1:23 am
    I've been fascinated with 1950s-1960s stuff for a long time, and for just as long I've accepted that people back then were fascinated with evil, misbehaving youth, and indeed thought that "JDs" were a Huge Problem in Society (i.e. West Side Story, Blackboard Jungle, or Rebel Without A Cause). Yet it also seems people were genuinely terrified of Teens Gone Bad, in a way it's hard to wrap my modern brain around. But how did this come about? Why were so people scared of "juvenile delinquents," and why was this considered a societal problem on par with battling Communism? I started looking around…
  • Introductory sources on biological classification

    carter
    9 Jun 2014 | 7:53 am
    I'm beginning a project that looks partly at biological classification, primarily in western science. I have no background in this, and so I'm digging around. I'm interested to know more about the current rules for nomenclature, and also to know more about historical, philosophical, sociological, knowledge practice, ethnographic, anthropological, science technology and society (STS), sociotechnical, etc., approaches to the study of biological classification. I'll take monographs, articles, papers, web sites, etc. I have access to a university library. What are some good sources that can…
  • Pool Side Social Sciences.

    Milau
    2 May 2014 | 6:04 am
    I'm leaving for a much deserved vacation. I will be spending a lot of time reading by the pool. I'm looking for good social science reads. I'm trying to plan a few books that I could bring on my next vacation (this month). I used to be a huge fan of fiction but have found myself struggling to get into it lately. Instead, I seem to spend my time reading in either sociology, anthropology or history. I'm looking for "empirical" reads, that is, books that are focused on lived experiences. I've read and enjoyed theoretical stuff (Bourdieu, Foucault, Rancière, Butler, etc), but am looking for…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • Botswana Democracy ignored by the Global Media by Pnina Werbner

    12 Dec 2014 | 4:19 am
    Pnina Werbneris Professor Emerita in Anthropology at Keele University and author of The Making of an African Working Class: Politics, Law and Cultural Protest in the Manual Workers' Union of Botswana (Pluto Press 2014).  In this post Pnina considers how Western ‘bad news’ perspectives on Africa disguises the strength of civil society and trade unions in protecting democracy and the public interest.Botswanais the oldest, fully functioning democracy in Africa. You would never guess it, however, by the way in which the country is ignored by the western – and global – media. Bad news…
  • Research training award for Nicola Edwards

    9 Dec 2014 | 7:50 am
    Congratulations to Nicola Edwards, a student on the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice programme at Keele, on being awarded a fully funded place on a 3-day research training school in Barcelona in January.  The training school is run by a European intergovernmental organisation called COST (Cooperation in Science and Technology) which encourages research collaboration across Europe and the theme of the school is 'Offender Supervision in Europe'.  Nicola graduated from Keele this summer with a first class honours degree in Criminology and Sociology and she is continuing her…
  • Sociology PhD funding opportunities, 2015-16

    24 Nov 2014 | 2:05 pm
    As part of the range of funding opportunities for new Social Science PhD students for 2015-16, we are keen to recruit high quality research students in Sociology and welcome applications in areas relating to research specialisms in the Sociology team.Particular areas of interest in Sociology are:Contemporary Social TheoryAnti-Capitalism and Social ProtestUtopias and Social ImaginariesSocial PsychologyGlobalisation and Global CulturesSociology of Media and CultureNew Media CulturesFamiliesChildhood and Consumer CultureEnvironment and Climate ChangeGender and ConsumptionParenting and…
  • The Beautiful Game or Football’s Fantasy

    24 Nov 2014 | 1:59 pm
    By Dr Andy ZieleniecFootball continues to be the nation’s favourite sport and 2014 has given fans plenty of highs and lows to enjoy. The culmination of mostly competitive leagues across Europe, a Brazilian World Cup, the start of new league campaigns and the qualifying rounds of European club and international competitions to mention a few. However, over the last few weeks football has appeared almost as much on the front pages of newspapers as much as the back. It seems that what happens in football (in this country at least) shines a light or holds a mirror up to many wider social…
  • Why Do We Give to Charity?

    13 Nov 2014 | 6:41 am
    By Dr Siobhan HolohanIt’s Children in Need tomorrow. The day in the year when the British public come together to raise hundreds of millions of pounds for children’s charities around the country. For weeks or months individuals and groups of people have run marathons, held bake-offs, or worn silly costumes to fundraise for this worthy cause. No-one can deny that the projects supported by this money need to be funded. They provide, amongst many other things, safe places for children to go when they feel threatened at home, respite care for the many thousands of children who care for…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    scatterplot

  • hot sociology, 2014 edition

    neal caren
    16 Dec 2014 | 11:16 am
    It is somewhat boring that my annual list of the most cited works in sociological journals always puts Bourdieu’s Distinction at the top. That was going to be the case again this year, so I decided to change the sorting algorithm to measure “hotness”. An article’s hotness is the number of cites it received in sociological journals this year divided by the log of the number of years since publication. This means that a work that was published in 2010 and cited 18 times in 2014, like Putnam and Campbell’s American Grace scores slightly higher than something that…
  • my experience with sociological science

    jeremy
    14 Dec 2014 | 8:25 am
    I published my second paper in Sociological Science last week (first paper here). I’ve had a great experience with them both times: what they say about quick, no-bulls**t turnaround is absolutely true. Two things that I might not have anticipated about publishing there: 1. Despite the stuff about how the journal evaluates papers and doesn’t mentor them, for both papers, we still got useful feedback in the process of acceptance that led to revisions that strengthened the papers. It wasn’t very much feedback, and certainly not the laundry list of this-and-that one gets from…
  • saturday is s-cat-terday

    Dan Hirschman
    6 Dec 2014 | 9:12 am
    Suffice it to say, it’s been a rough week. Thankfully, today we can distract ourselves with the internet’s biggest holiday. I came across a particular image that seemed worth sharing here: A comfortable spread Image via EconLolCats. May your Caturday be a chance to relax and regroup.
  • at a loss

    mike3550
    4 Dec 2014 | 6:21 am
    I am shocked, stunned, and maddened at the fact that Eric Gardner’s murderer will not even be prosecuted for a crime that was caught on camera. I am also deeply worried about the power of the state in a society where the message to police officers becomes anything that happens on the job will not be prosecuted under the law. You might lose your badge, you might lose your job, but we — as a society — will legally condone whatever you do. I am not a person to typically denounce the tyranny of the state. In fact, I tend to believe that most problems can be addressed by state…
  • antimatter

    jeremy
    1 Dec 2014 | 8:30 am
    So much self-loathing in sociology, so many different diagnoses as to why. Overall, it gets frankly tiresome, even though I find particular sociologists’ particular (parting?) shots interesting. The latest: Orlando Patterson has an essay on “How Sociologists Made Themselves Irrelevant” in today’s Chronicle. I thought his best lines were toward the end: The first is the Garfinkel rule, mentioned earlier: Never treat your subjects as cultural dopes. If you find yourself struggling to explain away your subjects’ own reasoned and widely held account of what they consider…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    potlatch

  • Governing through unhappiness

    Will
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:24 am
    Every sector, every profession, which can plausibly lay a claim to the 'public interest', is currently resisting austerity in one simple fashion: claiming that by hitting the sector or profession concerned, the real losers will be the public. Ironically the one industry that is now the greatest recipient of public financial beneficence, namely financial services, seems to have lost all sense of the public ever having an interest in the first place. I guess that's how they achieved such an extraordinary level of political arbitrage in the first place. So more fool the rest of us.
  • Economic sociology of neoliberalism - interview recording

    Will
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:49 am
    I strongly recommend the economic sociology blog, Estudios de la Economia, run by Jose Ossandon and Tomas Undurraga. One of the nice things about the interviews they publish is how they break the questions down, and upload each answer separately, meaning you don't have to dive into one vast hour-long MP3. They've just published an interview I did with them a few weeks ago, discussing my book. It's the most theoretical and sociological discussion I've yet had about the book, and was provoked by some very sharp questions.
  • against the neo-behaviorists

    Will
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:31 am
    The LSE Impact Blog have been hosting a debate on the future of the social sciences, in anticipation of this event tomorrow evening, with Nicholas Christakis, whose article on the need to 'shake up' the social sciences made a bit of a stir last year. A more recent article by Amanda Goodall and Andrew Oswald lept enthusiastically aboard Christakis's bandwagon, from a British context. The tenor of this debate irks me. It employs the rhetoric of 'modernity' and 'anti-conservatism' in a similar way to Tony Blair, namely, to back all critics into corners where they do…
  • The Limits of Neoliberalism discussions

    Will
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    As part of the slow-burning promotion of my book, a couple of discussions have been published in recent weeks, exploring the book's arguments. Firstly, New Left Project published a two-part interview I did with Tom Mills, one of their editors. These can be read here [pt 1] and here [pt 2]. Secondly, Renewal organised a symposium of critical reviews of the book, with a response from me. I was really delighted with the quality of these commentaries from Bob Jessop, Stephanie Mudge and Jonathan Derbyshire. You can download the pdf of this symposium here. 
  • in praise of family existentialism

    Will
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    When it comes to the cultural injunctions of the Guardian and Radio 4, I'm pretty obedient. In the past couple of weeks, I've seen Richard Linklater's film Boyhood and ploughed through most of the second volume of Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle. The parallels are very striking, as many have noticed. On a superficial level, they include an attention to minor, arguably banal details of everyday life; a preoccupation with family and the parent-child relationship; a length that runs the risk of boredom; an absence of plot, conventionally understood; and above all, a heroic…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    orgtheory.net

  • interstellar: another movie where they kill the black guy first

    fabiorojas
    18 Dec 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Question: In the movie Interstellar, what is the one thing that an advanced human race can not accomplish? Building a five dimensional tesseract allowing people to cross time itself. Making a wormhole connecting distant parts of the universe. Colonization and exploration of new planets. Letting the Black Guy live to the end of the movie. If you said 1, 2 or 3, then you know jack about science fiction. TV Tropes has a great list: The one guy  killed in The Shining is Dick Halloran; in Deep Blue Sea, Samuel Jackson is eaten by a shark; X-Men First class kills the only black character very…
  • do MBA’s actually become good managers?

    fabiorojas
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Henry Mintzberg raises the hypothesis that business schools aren’t terribly good at training managers: This is one question these centers of research do not study. We made an exception. A decade after its publication in 1990, I looked at a book called Inside the Harvard Business School, by David Ewing. (The first line was “The Harvard Business School is probably the most powerful private institution in the world.” Unfortunately he might have been right.) The book listed 19 Harvard alumni who “had made it to the top”—the school’s superstars as of 1990. My attention was drawn…
  • response to seth masket on social protest and civil rights

    fabiorojas
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Seth Masket recently discussed the popularity of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement more generally. In general, the civil rights movement was deeply unpopular, even at its height. Polls showed that a majority approved of civil rights after the fact. The point is well taken, but there is more to the story of public opinion and civil rights. Roughly speaking, public opinion was moving the direction of civil rights for decades, even if the general public didn’t quite approve of individual people or groups. It didn’t happen by itself. As Taeku Lee shows in…
  • winchester mystery house social policy

    fabiorojas
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:37 pm
    Andrea Campbell has an article in Vox about the often perverse consequences of means testing in social policy. If you really need help, then means testing creates an incentive to completely spend all your assets so you can qualify. She uses the tragic case of her sister-in-law who was left paralyzed after an auto accident and now requires round the clock medical care: Brian continued: Marcella qualified for Medi-Cal because she is disabled, but because Medi-Cal is for poor people, Dave and Marcella have to be poor to receive it-they have to “meet” the program’s “income…
  • is economics partisan? is all of social science just wrong?

    epopp
    15 Dec 2014 | 6:11 am
    Last week, fivethirtyeight.com put up a piece titled, “Economists Aren’t As Nonpartisan As We Think.” Beyond the slightly odd title (do we think they’re nonpartisan? should we expect them to be?), it’s an interesting write-up of a new working paper by Zubin Jelveh, Bruce Kogut, and Suresh Naidu. It went up a week ago, but since it gives me a chance to write about three of my favorite things, I thought it was still worth a post. Favorite thing 1: Economists The research started by identifying the political positions of economists, using campaign…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Antiquated Ideas

    16 Dec 2014 | 11:25 am
    December 16, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWho’s afraid of Virgina Woolf? The answer seems to be: men.MessyNessyChic (here) has posted some anti-women’s-suffrage posters from the 1890s and early 1900s.* The common theme is fear – fear that allowing women to vote will destroy masculinity. The anti-suffrage logic rests on the assumption that voting is masculine. Therefore women who want to vote are masculine, and men who would allow women to vote are feminine. If women get the vote, it’s the end of masculinity as we know it. Gender roles will not just be more similar, they will be…
  • Preaching to the Working Class

    16 Dec 2014 | 4:14 am
    December 16, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonCan’t these conservatives agree on what’s wrong with liberals?It was only a couple of years ago that Charles Murray was berating successful, upper-middle class liberals for not preaching to the White working class. They had gotten good educations, worked steadily at their jobs, and stayed married. But they didn’t try to inculcate these virtues in others. They didn’t even know those others or their culture.  The well-off liberals were keeping poorer Whites in the dark about how to be successful.Now comes Ross Douthat saying that liberals…
  • To Wit, I Was a Total Dick

    11 Dec 2014 | 10:36 am
    December 11, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonSometimes, somebody gets the apology thing right. (See this previous post on how not to apologize.Ben Edelman is the Harvard Business School professor whose e-mail exchanges about being overcharged $4 for Chinese food went viral. Technically, Edelman was in the right. Sichuan Garden charged him their current prices rather than the prices Edelman saw in their online menu when he ordered. But Edelman acted like a total dick. To wit, like a lawyer instead of a person.  (He has a law degree from Harvard. In fact, he has several degrees from Harvard…
  • Another Bungled Apology

    1 Dec 2014 | 11:19 am
    December 1, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonEver since Karen Cerulo’s talk at our AKD honors society event last spring, I’ve become more aware of apologies. The take-away from her research (with Janet Ruane) seems to be this: Don’t explain, don’t elaborate, and for God’s sake, don’t try to justify or get people to understand. Say that you made a mistake, you did something wrong, you’re sorry, and shut up.It seems obvious, but today brings us Elizabeth Lauten’s fifteen minutes of unfortunate fame. Lauten a staffer for a Republican congressman, posted something on Facebook…
  • Negative Negativity

    26 Nov 2014 | 8:12 pm
    November 26, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonNegative statements are harder to evaluate than are positive statements, though the difference may be only a microsecond of thought. 1.  True or False: Barack Obama is not president.2.  True or False: Barack Obama is president.When multiple negatives keep switching the sign from positive to negative and back, a reader sinks into the mud and struggles to find the meaning of the sentence.  In previous posts (here , for example) I’ve made up my own examples (“The Supreme Court today failed to overturn a lower-court ruling that denied a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Visualizing Philosophy Rankings

    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    The new Philosophical Gourmet Report Rankings are out today. The report ranks a selection of Ph.D programs in English-speaking Philosophy departments, both overall and for various subfields, on the basis of the judgments of professional philosophers. The report (and its editor) has been controversial in the past, and of course many people dislike the idea of rankings altogether. But as these things go the PGR is pretty good. It’s a straightforward reputational assessment made by a panel of experts from within the field. Raters score departments on a scale of zero to five in half-point…
  • The Godfather's End of Semester Meetings

    29 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    FADE FROM BLACK: PROF. CORLEONE’S OFFICE. DAY. BONASENIOR: … But the Associate Dean said it was out of his hands. And then my Mom texted me and said, “For extra credit opportunities, we must go to Professor Corleone.” PROF. CORLEONE: Why did you go to the Associate Dean? Why didn’t you come to me first? BONASENIOR: What do you want of me? Tell me anything. But do what I beg you to do. PROF. CORLEONE: What is that? [BONASENIOR whispers his request into PROF. CORLEONE’S ear.] PROF. CORLEONE: That I cannot do. BONASENIOR: I’ll give you anything you ask.
  • Fly Air Gini

    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    The other day at OrgTheory, Beth Berman had a very nice discussion on “inequality in the skies” about how much of space on planes is given over to different classes of passenger. Using seating charts, she calculated some rough Gini coefficients of inequality on board. For example, on a transatlantic flight in a three-class configuration with fancy lie-flat beds up front, if we look again at how the space is distributed, we now have 21% of the people using about 40% of the plane, 27% using another 20%, and the final 52% using the last 40%. The Gini index has now increased, to 25.
  • Sociology's Most Cited Papers by Decade

    14 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    My colleague Jim Moody sent along some interesting data this morning. Using the Web of Science database, he took the most-cited papers in Sociology and produced a Top 10 list for each decade going back to the 1950s. Not a table of which papers were most popular in those decades, but a table of which papers are now the most-cited from those decades. Note that the 1950s category is really “1950s and before”. The universe of citing papers is all of WoS. I absolve Jim of any responsibility for the figure I made from his data, or my comments below. Here’s a dotplot of the…
  • Scottish Independence

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    So, Scotland remains part of the United Kingdom. This morning on the bus (I should run a series called “Idle Data Analysis on the Bus”) I looked at how the high turnout compared to other Scottish elections. Data on turnout is easily available back to 1970. Here are two views of it. Voter turnout in Scotland in National elections and plebiscites since 1970. You can get a larger image or a PDF version of the figure if you want a closer look at it. As you can see, turnout for the Independence Referendum was both astonishingly high and way off-trend. In addition to the long-term…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Work, Employment & Society current issue

  • Book review: Gregor Gall (ed.), New Forms and Expressions of Conflict at Work

    Ackroyd, S.
    5 Dec 2014 | 4:05 am
  • Response to protecting research participants: in defence of Citizens Advice

    Holgate, J., Pollert, A., Keles, J., Kumarappan, L.
    5 Dec 2014 | 4:05 am
    This article is a response to a critique of our paper, ‘De-collectivization and employment problems: the experiences of minority ethnic workers seeking help through Citizens Advice’, published in this journal in 2012. We feel the author misunderstands the main tenet of the paper (the paucity of individual employment advice and a growing crisis for workers’ rights with the decline in collective union representation) and makes quite strident allegations attacking the methods we used to gather information from our interviewees. We refute these points and particularly the…
  • Mobility strategies, 'mobility differentials' and 'transnational exit': the experiences of precarious migrants in London's hospitality jobs

    Alberti, G.
    5 Dec 2014 | 4:05 am
    This article explores the patterns of occupational and geographical mobility of migrant hospitality workers, drawing on participatory research in London. It focuses on the ways in which migrants strategize around temporary employment and move across different jobs and locations trying to improve their precarious lives. Combining labour process theory and the perspective of the autonomy of migration the author reviews the concept of ‘mobility power’ as a form of resistance to degrading work. The findings illustrate that, while certain categories of migrants remain trapped in…
  • Books for review

    5 Dec 2014 | 4:05 am
  • Do options for job flexibility diminish in times of economic uncertainty?

    Sweet, S., Besen, E., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., McNamara, T. K.
    5 Dec 2014 | 4:05 am
    This study explores the possibility that the 2008 economic recession affected the availability of flexible work arrangements by comparing two surveys of organizations in the USA, one conducted prior to the recession and the other after its onset. Adaptation and institutional perspectives are contrasted, revealing different expectations for the effects of economic tumult on the availability of flexible work arrangements. Greater support is found for the adaptation perspective, as organizations offered fewer flexible work options in 2009 than in 2006. They also engaged in less promotion of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Our External and Internal Selves

    halsmith
    17 Dec 2014 | 7:19 am
    I have a theory. We put too much of ourselves outside ourselves, became alienated from ourselves, turned against ourselves, and are now destroying ourselves. I begin with the present, where I can clearly see that we are destroying ourselves. But I can also see we are not aware of this – and didn’t want to be aware of it. This immediately puts me in an awkward situation – I think I know what is going on – but one else is interested. There is too big a gap, and a fundamental gap, between me and them. To put this another way – I live in a dying world, and there is…
  • Sore Legs

    Dennis Cardiff
    17 Dec 2014 | 6:56 am
    17 December 2014 “Hi Joy, how are your legs today?” “They’re sore. Yesterday I could hardly walk. I think I may have water on my knee, it’s swollen.” “Are you going to see a doctor?” “Not if I can help it. I have a doctor, but he creeps me out. He’s one of those guys under a turban. I just don’t feel comfortable around him and it’s hard to understand what he’s saying. “I hate that Ghyslain is panning on the corner. He’s cutting my grass. I think he’s on crack. One day he was bragging about how much…
  • The making of a democratic citizenship in Spain, 1977-2004

    John Postill
    16 Dec 2014 | 11:02 pm
    Brief notes on Benedicto, J. (2006). La construcción de la ciudadanía democrática en España (1977-2004): de la institucionalización a las prácticas. Revista española de investigaciones sociológicas, 114(1), 103-136. English abstract This article examines the historical process of construction of citizenship in Spain from the beginning of the democratic experience up to the last general elections. This historical process can only be understood properly if we analyse its close relationship with the development of democratic culture and the huge modernization of Spanish social life. The…
  • Getting Prepared To Be Prepared

    allempiresfall
    16 Dec 2014 | 10:31 pm
    The first thing I can tell you with 100% certainty is those who do not have a plan are doomed to fail. If society collapsed tomorrow, what would you do? Where would you go? How would you feed yourself? How would you defend yourself and your family? What are you willing to do to survive? What are you willing to do to protect your loved ones? How would you treat injuries? Any urban survival expert on the planet will tell you that the longer you stay in an urban environment the lower your chances of survival become. The only way to survive is to get remote and secure ASAP. The more remote, the…
  • Can't You Just Get Over It?

    lanamunro
    16 Dec 2014 | 8:38 pm
    Being a self-confessed nerd, my friends and family are unfortunately familiar with the equation: Alana + university grind period = stress. However, until this year, I oddly thought I needed stress. I correlated stress with motivation and higher marks (an error of judgement from my HSC days), reminding myself that those who achieved academic excellence, a graduate role in a fancy firm or an extensive successful career endured copious amounts of stress. In hindsight, stress may have accompanied them from time to time – probably a bit far-fetched if it didn’t – but these people I idolised…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Time management skills keep animals primed for survival

    18 Dec 2014 | 11:37 pm
    Many animals may have a previously under-appreciated ability to make up for lost time with more effort, according to new research publishing this week in PLOS Computational Biology. read more
  • Crows are smarter than you think

    18 Dec 2014 | 2:43 pm
    Crows have long been heralded for their high intelligence -- they can remember faces, use tools and communicate in sophisticated ways. read more
  • Fine particulate air pollution linked with increased autism risk

    18 Dec 2014 | 2:41 pm
    Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). The greater the exposure, the greater the risk, researchers found. It was the first U.S.-wide study exploring the link between airborne particulate matter and autism. read more
  • Contrasting views of kin selection assessed

    17 Dec 2014 | 2:45 pm
    In an article to be published in the January issue of BioScience, two philosophers tackle one of the most divisive arguments in modern biology: the value of the theory of "kin selection." read more
  • Study finds that employees who are open about religion are happier

    17 Dec 2014 | 2:44 pm
    It may be beneficial for employers to not only encourage office Christmas parties but also celebrate holidays and festivals from a variety of religions, according to a Kansas State University researcher. read more
Log in