Sociology

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  • Do Parents Matter? Revisiting Ethnic Penalties in Occupation among Second Generation Ethnic Minorities in England and Wales

    SagePub: Sociology
    Zuccotti, C. V.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    The article studies the role of the class of origin in the occupational outcomes of second generation ethnic minorities and white British in England and Wales. In so doing, it reconsiders the relationship between ‘ethnic penalties’ and intergenerational social reproduction (or the reverse: intergenerational social mobility) by combining approaches from the migration and social stratification literatures. Two main hypotheses are tested. The first states that the class of origin, or parental social background, helps explain differences in occupational outcomes between ethnic…
  • Homo Promo

    Montclair SocioBlog
    9 Mar 2015 | 12:39 pm
    March 9, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonMoslem clerics and Christian evangelicals are often united in their opposition to sex ed, as Roger Zimmerman notes in today’s New York Times (here).  These are not such strange bedfellows.  They share the idea that sex ed will “promote homosexuality,” a phrase which has acquired a certain currency. Google it, and you'll see this. Along with media forces like Ellen DeGeneres and “Modern Family,” sex ed promotes homosexuality by showing homosexual as nice, normal, endearing people. [It] will convince many school children that…
  • How much math, science homework is too much?

    eScienceNews: Sociology
    23 Mar 2015 | 9:34 am
    When it comes to adolescents with math and science homework, more isn't necessarily better -- an hour a day is optimal -- but doing it alone and regularly produces the biggest knowledge gain, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. read more
  • Telephone Etiquette and Social Change

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    11 Mar 2015 | 3:09 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer In the second grade, I remember seeing a film in school about how to appropriately answer the telephone. This was way before cell phones came on the market and the phone we learned to answer was presumably the family’s main phone line. I can still recall some of the lessons. Be polite—say hello first, and allow the caller to introduce himself or herself. If they do not do so after the hello, it is okay to say “who’s calling, please?” The answerer was never to pick up the phone and say “who’s this!?!” as it would sound rude. Interrupting was very bad;…
  • Michael Gerson: Effects of inequality: The situation for kids was better in the past

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    17 Mar 2015 | 8:41 pm
    Robert Putnam's "Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis" is sociology as story, as tragedy and as an act of social...
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • The Sociology of #ShowUsYourFridge - Ricochet.com

    30 Mar 2015 | 5:11 am
    Ricochet.comThe Sociology of #ShowUsYourFridgeRicochet.comScreen Shot 2015-03-29 at 11.48.08 AM A couple of weeks ago, an app called Meerkat was introduced at SXSW in Austin, Texas. It quick became the talk of the conference, and politicians and celebrities became high-profile early adopters. This past ...and more »
  • The Thrill: 'Girls', a sociology of the teen, and Angelina Jolie - Macleans.ca

    27 Mar 2015 | 11:08 am
    Macleans.caThe Thrill: 'Girls', a sociology of the teen, and Angelina JolieMacleans.caEvery Friday, Maclean's arts writers Adrian Lee, Emma Teitel and Julia De Laurentiis Johnson gather to discuss and break down the hottest topics in TV, film, books and music. Expect discussion, analysis and interviews, all replicating the feeling of
  • Snake Oil Sociology - Town Hall

    26 Mar 2015 | 9:04 pm
    Town HallSnake Oil SociologyTown HallThe American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Sociological Association (ASA) submitted friend of the Court briefs in the Windsor case. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled portions of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional.and more »
  • Mathematics and sociology leaders to speak at UC Merced commencement - Merced Sun-Star

    25 Mar 2015 | 7:21 pm
    Mathematics and sociology leaders to speak at UC Merced commencementMerced Sun-StarDuring the second ceremony, another 625 graduating students from the School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts will hear from Marrett, a well-known leader in the fields of education and sociology. According to the release, Marrett is professor
  • Sociology professor: Self-presentation correlates with self-esteem - UTA The Shorthorn

    24 Mar 2015 | 6:28 pm
    Sociology professor: Self-presentation correlates with self-esteemUTA The ShorthornIt's 6:30 a.m., the alarm goes off and it's time for nursing junior Gienysa Harris to get ready for the day. She starts her daily routine by brushing her teeth, washing her face and watching the weather channel. For some women, looking attractive isn't
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Ask a Sociologist

    W. W. Norton
    27 Mar 2015 | 2:59 pm
    Have a sociological question for our bloggers? Ask us and it may appear as part of a future post!
  • Magical Thinking vs. Sociological Reasoning

    W. W. Norton
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:42 am
    By Karen Sternheimer A student of a colleague had failed a course after rarely attending and not completing several assignments. The ones he did complete were poorly done; he did not see the instructor in office hours despite repeated invitations to talk about improving his grade during the course. He earned 25 out of 100 points in the course, and perhaps unsurprisingly, an F. But to my colleague’s surprise, the student emailed after seeing his final grade, asking if there was any way he could earn a C in the course (which typically requires 70%, well above his 25%). Maybe the instructor…
  • Why is the World so Screwed Up?

    W. W. Norton
    19 Mar 2015 | 10:09 am
    By Peter Kaufman The title of this post may seem like a rhetorical question but I am actually quite earnest in asking it. Each day, we hear about countless instances of greed, hatred, violence, and destruction, and all of the pain, suffering, and sorrow that ensues. Although the ubiquity of these problems makes them seem so normal and ordinary that we may not even question them, I don’t think it’s possible to be a sociologist without wondering why these horrible social ills exist.   The list of “screwed up” things is a bit overwhelming to comprehend because there are so many…
  • Debates Surrounding Gentrification

    W. W. Norton
    16 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales Recently a friend asked me if gentrification is ever a good thing. The question arose from a conversation regarding the ongoing gentrification of the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago; a place where I grew up and where much of my family still lives. In answering the question, I realized that sociology helps to both make sense of this changing neighborhood and also consider how Pilsen relates to other communities across the U.S. that are also dealing with the effects of gentrification.The Pilsen neighborhood has historically been home to waves of working-class immigrants.
  • Telephone Etiquette and Social Change

    W. W. Norton
    11 Mar 2015 | 3:09 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer In the second grade, I remember seeing a film in school about how to appropriately answer the telephone. This was way before cell phones came on the market and the phone we learned to answer was presumably the family’s main phone line. I can still recall some of the lessons. Be polite—say hello first, and allow the caller to introduce himself or herself. If they do not do so after the hello, it is okay to say “who’s calling, please?” The answerer was never to pick up the phone and say “who’s this!?!” as it would sound rude. Interrupting was very bad;…
 
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    SagePub: Sociology

  • Dual Book Review Symposium: Jeremy Seabrook, Pauperland: Poverty and the Poor in Britain

    Fitzpatrick, T.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
  • No Crisis but Methodological Separatism: A Comparative Study of Finnish and Danish Publication Trends between 1990 and 2009

    Erola, J., Reimer, D., Rasanen, P., Kropp, K.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    This article compares methodological trends in nationally and internationally oriented sociology using data from the articles of three Nordic sociological journals: one international (Acta Sociologica), one Finnish (Sosiologia), and one Danish (Dansk Sociologi). The data consists of 943 articles in total: 353 published in Acta Sociologica, 277 in Sosiologia and 313 in Dansk Sociologi over the period 1990–2009. We distinguish between three main types of article: those having no or very little empirical content; empirical articles applying qualitative analysis; and empirical articles…
  • The Hidden Internationalism of Elite English Schools

    Brooks, R., Waters, J.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    Analyses of UK higher education have provided compelling evidence of the way in which this sector has been affected by globalisation. There is now a large literature documenting the internationalisation of British universities, and the strategic and economic importance attached to attracting students from abroad. Within the schools sector, it has been argued that parents are increasingly concerned about the acquisition of valuable multicultural ‘global capital’. Nevertheless, we know little about whether ‘internationalism’ and/or the inculcation of ‘global…
  • On Ambivalence and Hope in the Restless Search for Community: How to Work with the Idea of Community in the Global Age

    Mulligan, M.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    Sociologists have been debating the idea of community for over a century with some continuing to suggest that it has no relevance in the contemporary world. Attempts to turn to other terms – such as ‘social capital’ – have not worked and many scholars have suggested that the desire for community has increased in a world of global insecurities. Gerard Delanty’s work on the communicative construction of community is the best attempt to unpack the contemporary meaning of the word yet he underplays the dangers of community and he stops short of contemplating the…
  • Do Parents Matter? Revisiting Ethnic Penalties in Occupation among Second Generation Ethnic Minorities in England and Wales

    Zuccotti, C. V.
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    The article studies the role of the class of origin in the occupational outcomes of second generation ethnic minorities and white British in England and Wales. In so doing, it reconsiders the relationship between ‘ethnic penalties’ and intergenerational social reproduction (or the reverse: intergenerational social mobility) by combining approaches from the migration and social stratification literatures. Two main hypotheses are tested. The first states that the class of origin, or parental social background, helps explain differences in occupational outcomes between ethnic…
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Are we more or less honest than a hundred years ago?

    mecran01
    12 Mar 2015 | 12:49 am
    Are the citizens of the U.S. more or less honest than a hundred years ago? Is there any longitudinal research that explores this question? I'm always hearing people decry the corruption and dishonesty of people in general, but from what I can tell, we have always been ripping each other off. Is there any solid research, like a workplace integrity test or something, that has been consistently administered over the last 50-100 years that could answer this question meaningfully?
  • Primers on Bourdieu

    codacorolla
    9 Mar 2015 | 1:13 pm
    I'm interested in becoming more familiar with Bourdieu's ideas of habitas, fields, and forms of capital. I'd like to start with a primer book, or perhaps a collection of essays, that go over his ideas. Can you recommend one that covers these main ideas, frames them in terms of contemporary theorists, and is fairly accessible?
  • examples of technologies or social institutions that are "stuck"

    mrmanvir
    9 Mar 2015 | 7:52 am
    HIVEMIND! Does anyone know of any examples of technologies or social institutions that are "stuck" at some sub-optimal state, where we recognize that there are better alternatives out there, but everyone is just used to the current situation and coordinating a huge shift is just too difficult? The clearest example I can think of is having the Qwerty keyboard instead of the Dvorak, where we know that one is better but instituting it would require massive coordination and huge startup costs.
  • Examples of taboos on holy or religiously influential people?

    mrmanvir
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:59 pm
    Maori chiefs were taboo'd from eating inside their houses, the Jewish Kohen (priests) couldn't handle dead bodies, and clerical classes across religious traditions have required celibacy -- does anyone know of any other examples of taboos on holy or religiously influential people? The cultures can range from contemporary big religions (e.g. Abrahamic) to the animism of small-scale societies - all examples are welcome!! THANKS!
  • Growing pains, should I seek help?

    imagine_dragon
    16 Feb 2015 | 9:05 pm
    I'm a man and in my mid 20's. I'm currently working on attaining my masters in social work, I've been reading up on research and While I'm no psychiatrist I do feel that I have suffered episodes of abandonment. My Stepfather ( who has raised me since I was two) suffered during his upbringing. He never met his father and his mom neglected a lot of her motherly duties. In a lot of ways he raised himself. I believe that his upbringing had everything to do with why he could never display signs of affection towards me growing up. I received the material satisfactions from my father but emotionally…
 
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • Mobile Phones and Enforcement Retreat

    6 Mar 2015 | 6:43 am
    By Adam Snow, PhD student, Criminology According to reports out recently we are in the midst of a retreat from road policing enforcement of mobile phone use behind the wheel, although some novel ideas (ironic font) are being used.  I leave aside the serious claim made by Suzette Davenport, the Chief Constable of Gloucestershire, that enforcement is being back peddled due to the upcoming election.  If true this a very serious accusation and one that shouldn't be ignored given the person making the accusation.I wondered, being a curious type and someone who is interested in road…
  • What is the Meaning of Syriza?

    28 Jan 2015 | 3:17 am
    By Dr Mark FeatherstoneWhat is the meaning of Syriza, the big winners in the Greek elections earlier this week, whose rise to power led the British Prime Minister, David Cameron, to warn against increased economic uncertainty and turbulence? The root of Cameron’s concern is clear – Syriza are against austerity and want to renegotiate the terms of Greece’s bailout package with the EU and centrally their German creditors. It is well documented, by writers such as Costas Douzinas, that Greece’s debt repayment plan has effectively destroyed the country’s social structure and left…
  • Keele Refugee Week 2015 Call for Events

    23 Jan 2015 | 1:42 am
    It may be five months away but we are already gearing up for Keele Refugee Week 2015! ‘Refugee Week is a UK-wide programme of arts, cultural and education events and activities that celebrates the contribution of refugees to the UK and promotes better understanding of why people seek sanctuary’ (Refugee Week 2015). Last year Keele University joined Refugee Week for the first time by hosting a weeklong photographic exhibition, an opening event with a musical performance and a poetry open mic night organised by students. This was co-organized by staff and students in the Faculty of…
  • New paper by Ala Sirriyeh on class and the new UK family migration rules

    14 Jan 2015 | 4:30 am
    In July 2012 the Conservative–Liberal Democrat Coalition government introduced a new set of family migration rules. These rules set a sharp increase in the minimum income threshold for people sponsoring partners and children to join them in the UK. Consequently, there has been a significant reduction in the number of visas granted through the family migration route. The journal Critical Social Policy has just published an article I have written which examines these new rules. The article is called ‘‘All need is love and £18,600’: class and the new UK family migration rules’ and…
  • Botswana Democracy ignored by the Global Media by Pnina Werbner

    12 Dec 2014 | 4:19 am
    Pnina Werbneris Professor Emerita in Anthropology at Keele University and author of The Making of an African Working Class: Politics, Law and Cultural Protest in the Manual Workers' Union of Botswana (Pluto Press 2014).  In this post Pnina considers how Western ‘bad news’ perspectives on Africa disguises the strength of civil society and trade unions in protecting democracy and the public interest.Botswanais the oldest, fully functioning democracy in Africa. You would never guess it, however, by the way in which the country is ignored by the western – and global – media. Bad news…
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    scatterplot

  • fun with moocs: i “heart” stats

    DJM
    25 Mar 2015 | 12:49 pm
    As many of you already know, I am leaving Notre Dame to become the provost at Marquette University in a couple of months.  I am really excited to get started there, but I have a couple of things to finish up here on the home front as well.  One of them is that I will be teaching Notre Dame’s first “MOOC”, which is supposed to be a super fun introduction to statistics.  Below is the trailer for the course, which I’m sure you’ll find entertaining.  It completely embodies my approach to teaching this course…You’ll have to decided, after watching it,…
  • fun with musical taste and identity

    andrewperrin
    25 Mar 2015 | 7:14 am
    In my intro theory class yesterday I did an exercise using PollEverywhere to evoke associations between musical taste and identity. I played four musical pieces and asked the students to type free-text responses to “What kind of people like this song?”. Their responses were lots of fun, and I present them below in raw form for your enjoyment, interest, and comment. 1.) Megan Trainor, “All About that Bass” most people Mainstream consumers of pop culture D everyone fun kids Overweight females not me people who only listen to the radio Girls that are overweight upbeat people 5…
  • rapid response teaching

    olderwoman
    18 Mar 2015 | 2:35 pm
    A young unarmed Black man was shot by a White police officer in Madison a week and a half ago (not that common an event here) and there have been a lot of protests and a lot of discussion here about this.We got feedback from our TAs that they wanted more support for dealing with these kinds of emotion-laden issues in the classroom. Partly just acknowledgement that many of them, as well as many of the students, had personal ties to the young man who was killed, or personal reasons to feel close to the matter. And partly advice and teaching resources for being ready to deal with both the…
  • academic hot takes

    neal caren
    17 Mar 2015 | 7:21 am
    A post over at orgtheory reminded me of this nice bit by Jeff Goodwin: Hypothesis number one: For any book to become widely cited today, let alone to influence how people think, it must be reducible to a few general and easily grasped formulations. Many texts are “formulated,” furthermore, not by their authors, but by more or less officially designated readers (call them DRs), including reviewers for academic journals. Books that cannot be formulaically summarized by DRs, accurately or otherwise, are unlikely to generate much discussion, let alone change minds. The process of…
  • what are we measuring when we measure behavior? elementary school edition

    Dan Hirschman
    12 Mar 2015 | 1:26 pm
    Organizations (and/or authority figures within organizations) are frequently called on to make consequential decisions about individuals. These decisions range from who to admit to a selective undergraduate institution or graduate program to which mortgage applications to accept to which prisoners should be paroled. The organizations and individuals have at their disposal varying kinds of information, which are perceived as being differently valuable in making those decisions. For example, in undergraduate admissions, we may know a student’s GPA, their SAT score, their class rank, the…
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    potlatch

  • the society of exit

    Will
    26 Mar 2015 | 3:50 am
    If death used to be a 'great career move' for rockstars - if only that were still the case - it is hard to escape the sense that being axed is now a 'great career move' for the mega-celebrities, who occupy the intermediary space between the secretive private jets of the billionaires and the spectacles of broadcast media and major sports. In the UK, Jonathan Ross and Kevin Pietersen are two examples of this. Jeremy Clarkson is clearly another. These individuals represent a particular class of celebrity: hugely rich, 'talented' in the sense of willing to 'be…
  • new article: from cigarettes to smartphones

    Will
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:16 am
    I have a new piece in openDemocracy, exploring cultural and economic transitions, via the shift from a society of cigarettes to one of smartphones. Here's a chunk: ...on a deeper psychological and cultural level, the difference between these two framing devices could scarcely be more profound. This touches on the malaise of anxiety that has become the dominant psychiatric disorder of our age. While smoking affirms the limits of time and space around us, smart phones do precisely the opposite. While one allows you to spend a finite chunk of time in a given space, as a break from the flux…
  • PERC Events

    Will
    13 Feb 2015 | 7:26 am
    In case I haven't already tweeted about it enough, I've been in the process of setting up a new Political Economy Research Centre (PERC) at Goldsmiths over the last few months, together with some great colleagues. PERC sits alongside our new heterodox PPE degree, which is currently in its first year. You can read about our research ambitions and interests on the website. Hopefully there will be projects and publications to follow. In the meantime, here are two events that are open to all (registration via Eventbrite links is required), both at Goldsmiths: 'From REcovery to…
  • Neoliberalism discussion on Novara

    Will
    3 Feb 2015 | 1:53 am
    Last week I was a guest on Novara FM, to discuss neoliberalism with Aaron Bastani. You can listen to the show here. In case that's not enough neoliberalism discussion, I gave a talk on a similar topic of 'what is neoliberalism?' at The Big Ideas last summer, which is available here.
  • the seduction of behaviorism

    Will
    13 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    I have a piece in The New Inquiry, entitled 'The Data Sublime', exploring the strange everyday appeal of technologies of surveillance and control. My tentative hypothesis is that there is something psychoanalytic going on here, involving the desire to be dominated by incomprehensible data analytics, which liberal assumptions about 'trade-offs' (between freedom and security, or autonomy and convenience etc) completely overlook. Here's a chunk: The notorious Facebook experiment on “emotional contagion” was understandably controversial. But would it be implausible to…
 
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    orgtheory.net

  • three article default

    fabiorojas
    29 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    On  Twitter, Brad Spahn asked: What would you change about your dept to make faculty & grad students happier and more productive? Hold U-wide rules fixed.cc @fabiorojas — Brad Spahn (@BradSpahn) March 20, 2015   I actually had two answers: First, eliminate the monthly/weekly faculty meeting. But our department already did that!! Except for “big” issues like hiring or curriculum rewrites, we leave most decision making to our elected executive committee. Also, we genuinely try to reduce required meetings. My real answer, though, was “make all dissertations three…
  • the subcontrabass flute

    fabiorojas
    28 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street!! 
  • gen con stands up for gay rights

    fabiorojas
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:07 pm
    In one the proudest moments in the history of nerdery, GenCon’s ownership has come out against Indiana’s SB 101 bill, which encourages private businesses to discriminate against gay customers: The organizers of Gen Con, the city’s largest convention in attendance and economic impact, are threatening to move the event elsewhere if Gov. Mike Pence signs controversial religious freedom legislation that could allow business owners to refuse services to same-sex couples. “Legislation that could allow for refusal of service or discrimination against our attendees will have a…
  • open borders… in the new york times?

    fabiorojas
    25 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    An op-ed in the New York Times makes the case for open borders. From Debunking the Myth of the Job Stealing Immigrant by Adam Davidson: … Few of us are calling for the thing that basic economic analysis shows would benefit nearly all of us: radically open borders. And yet the economic benefits of immigration may be the ­most ­settled fact in economics. A recent University of Chicago poll of leading economists could not find a single one who rejected the proposition. (There is one notable economist who wasn’t polled: George Borjas of Harvard, who believes that his fellow economists…
  • orgtheory puzzle: why does sears still exist?

    fabiorojas
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Puzzle for you all your org behavior/theory of the firm types: Why does Sears still exist? Normally, when we think about why successful firms exist, we think that they have a unique product, fill a niche, or have some sort of incumbent advantage. Or just overly aggressive management. But in a world of Amazon, Target, and Home Depot, it’s difficult to understand what Sears does well. Why aren’t they gobbled up by Lowes or Home Depot? Or dismembered by selling off its prime real estate holdings? You see the occasional article on the topic. Forbes in 2011 claimed that it was…
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Clogged Traffic at the Gateway

    26 Mar 2015 | 8:04 pm
    March 26, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonAll politicians lie, said I.F. Stone. But they don’t all lie as blatantly as Chris Christie did yesterday in repeating his vow not to legalize marijuana in New Jersey.Every bit of objective data we have tells us that it’s a gateway drug to other drugs.Maybe the governor was trying to show what a good Republican he is when it comes to the findings of science, because that statement simply is not true. The evidence on marijuana as a gateway drug is at best mixed, as the governor or any journalist interested in fact checking his speech could have…
  • Higher Ed as Cheerios

    25 Mar 2015 | 6:44 pm
    March 25, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonHow embarrassing. The University of North Georgia used this stock photo for the cover of their course catalogue.  Two White men in suit, white shirt, and tie crossing the finish line triumphantly well ahead of a White woman (dressed more casually). Staggering in last place is a Black man (no suit jacket). What were they thinking, the people who chose this photo. More accurately, what were they seeing, or still more accurately, what were they not seeing? One of the privileges of being in the dominant group is that you don’t have to worry about how…
  • To Kindle a Fire

    22 Mar 2015 | 5:42 am
    March 21, 2015Posted by Jay Livingston“Ye shall kindle no fire throughout your habitations upon the sabbath day” (Exodus 35:3).  Orthodox Jews extend this prohibition to electricity. No flipping that wall switch or pushing the start button. But Jews have figured out ways of getting around this restriction – keeping to the letter of the law without having to endure the least inconvenience. Last June, I blogged (here) about the shabbos goy – the gentile you pay to come in and light the oven. (“Hey, God only said that I couldn’t start the oven. He didn’t say anything about…
  • Freedom and Freeloaders

    11 Mar 2015 | 2:41 pm
    March 11, 2015Posted by Jay Livingston        A Wall Street Journal op-ed heralded Wisconsin’s “right to work” (RTW) law that Gov. Walker signed earlier this week. The column carried the byline of  Luke Hilgemann and David Fladeboe of Americans for Prosperity, which gets a ton of money from the Koch brothers, so their support of the anti-union measure is no surprise. One of their arguments is that RTW states see a greater growth in jobs and income. Or put another way, capital will move to where labor costs are low. If a corporation shifts its work to a…
  • Homo Promo

    9 Mar 2015 | 12:39 pm
    March 9, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonMoslem clerics and Christian evangelicals are often united in their opposition to sex ed, as Roger Zimmerman notes in today’s New York Times (here).  These are not such strange bedfellows.  They share the idea that sex ed will “promote homosexuality,” a phrase which has acquired a certain currency. Google it, and you'll see this. Along with media forces like Ellen DeGeneres and “Modern Family,” sex ed promotes homosexuality by showing homosexual as nice, normal, endearing people. [It] will convince many school children that…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Paddy O'Carroll

    21 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Thanks, Paddy. I’m very sad to hear that Paddy O’Carroll died this weekend in Cork. He was one of my first teachers in Sociology, and a man of deep intelligence, humanity, and insight into Irish society and especially its political community. Famously disorganized in lecture, he was nevertheless sharp as a pin in conversation. I can’t count the number of times he brought me up short with some observation or anecdote that I’d spend the rest of the day thinking about. He taught me each of my three years as an undergraduate, he supervised my M.A. thesis, and he urged me…
  • Gender and Citation in Four General-Interest Philosophy Journals, 1993-2013

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Last Thursday I gave a talk at the American Philosophical Association’s Central Division meetings about patterns in publication and citation in some of the field’s major journals. I have a more extensive analysis of the data that’s almost done, but that deserves a paper of its own rather than a post. Here I’ll confine myself mostly to descriptive material about some broad trends, together with a bit of discussion at the end. I examined patters of publication and citation in four high-prestige, nominally general-interest journals within Anglo-American philosophy. The…
  • Another Look at the California Vaccination Data

    2 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Update: Updated to identify Catholic schools. (And again later, with more Catholic schools ID’d.) I took another look at the vaccination exemption data I discussed the other day. This time I was interested in getting a closer look at the range of variation between different sorts of schools. My goal was to extract a bit more information about the different sorts of elementary schools in the state, just using the data from the Health Department spreadsheet. As we saw before, the smaller the unit of observation the more variability we are likely to uncover. So, looking at the rate of…
  • Vaccination Exemptions in California Kindergartens

    28 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    California Kindergarten PBE Rates by Type of School, 2014-15. (PDF available.) I came across a report this afternoon, via Eric Rauchway, about high rates of vaccination exemption in Sacramento schools. As you are surely aware, this is a serious political and public health problem at the moment. Like Eric, I was struck by just how high some of the rates were. So I went and got the data from the California Department of Public Health, just wanting to take a quick look at it. If you want to follow along, I put up a github repository with the data and R code for the plots. I’ll just confine…
  • American Movie

    19 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Update, January 22nd: Now with plots standardized per thousand films released that year. It’s time for another episode of Data Analysis on the Bus. This one follows from an exchange on Twitter, prompted by the coverage of American Sniper about the tendency to use the word “American” in film titles, especially when you want things to sound terribly serious. This led to a bit of freewheeling and it has to be said perhaps tendentious cultural theorizing on my part. Rather more usefully, it also prompted Benjamin Schmidt to send me some IMDB data containing film titles with the…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Browse our catalogues online...

    ashgatepublishing
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:58 am
    Online versions of our printed catalogues are available to browse. Please follow the links below to your subject(s) of interest. Most of our catalogues are available in two formats, ‘eCatalogue’ which is a ‘page turning’ document, and standard PDF which loads in Acrobat Reader. Both versions include links to full book details on our website, for further information and for ease of ordering. Don’t forget, ALL orders on our website receive 10% discount. Arts Ashgate Reference Gower Humanities Interdisciplinary Studies Lund Humphries Professional Practice Social…
  • “CUANDO UN PUEBLO ADOPTA COMO ESTILO DE VIDA LA BARBARIE, EL TERRORISMO, LA VIOLACIÓN DE LOS DERECHOS HUMANOS, EL CRIMEN, EL SECUESTRO, LA INJUSTICIA, LA IMPUNIDAD, LA CORRUPCIÓN, EL SAQUEO, EL ROBO, LA MENTIRA, LA TRAICIÓN, EL FANATISMO, LA IGNORANCIA, EL TRÁFICO HUMANO…, SÓLO LE QUEDA ESPERAR LA OPCIÓN FINAL: COLAPSO”

    RUANO FAXAS
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:57 am
    “CUANDO UN PUEBLO ADOPTA COMO ESTILO DE VIDA LA BARBARIE, EL TERRORISMO, LA VIOLACIÓN DE LOS DERECHOS HUMANOS, EL CRIMEN, EL SECUESTRO, LA INJUSTICIA, LA IMPUNIDAD, LA CORRUPCIÓN, EL SAQUEO, EL ROBO, LA MENTIRA, LA TRAICIÓN, EL FANATISMO, LA IGNORANCIA, EL TRÁFICO HUMANO…, SÓLO LE QUEDA ESPERAR LA OPCIÓN FINAL: COLAPSO”  Barbarie Barbarism Barbarity Варварство https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=BARBARIE%20ruanofaxas&src=typd Terrorismo Terrorism Терроризм https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=TERRORISMO%20ruanofaxas&src=sprv Corrupción…
  • Reading Social Science for Dummies

    sdodini
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:23 am
    Here is a crash course in how to wade through the headlines in a not-so-foolproof list of steps. A) When you see “study says” or “a new study…” in the headlines, remember that it is most likely one of several studies and likely not a definitive result. B) Note the news source you are using. If it is on Fox News, Huffington Post, or MSNBC, the probability is high (but not 100%) that the results might be misrepresented. C) Google or find a link to the original article and read the abstract (at least!). It’s one to two paragraphs but can definitely tell you a…
  • New Pub on Phenomenologies of Racial Power, with Jennifer Correa

    James M. Thomas (JT)
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:19 am
    My colleague and dear friend, Jennifer Correa, and I recently had our article on Latino border patrol agents and the dynamics of racial power published in the new American Sociological Association journal, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity. Entitled, “The Rebirth of the U.S.-Mexico Border”, in it Jennifer and I expand upon Nick Crossley’s “phenomenology of power” to articulate the dynamic interplay between race, space, and power as it’s practiced in the policing of brown bodies by brown bodies along the U.S.-Mexico border. We describe a phenomenology of…
  • Center for Civil & Human Rights Experience

    Cherrelle
    27 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Family income, parental education related to brain structure in children and adolescents

    30 Mar 2015 | 11:32 am
    Characterizing associations between socioeconomic factors and children's brain development, a team including investigators from nine universities across the country reports correlative links between family income and brain structure. Relationships between the brain and family income were strongest in the lowest end of the economic range -- suggesting that interventional policies aimed at these children may have the largest societal impact. The study, led by researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Columbia University Medical Center, will be published…
  • Damselfly war games

    27 Mar 2015 | 12:41 pm
    Before a male damselfly hot-headedly enters into a duel of aerial sparring, it first works out its strategy. It gives its opponent's wings a once-over to assess its strength, knowing that more transparent wings and larger red spots generally show a stronger rival. Those who then decide to engage in long fights either try to wear their opponent down, or dazzle them with brilliant aerial moves that are too hard to follow. These damselfly war game strategies are set out in a study published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature -- Naturwissenschaften. Two research groups united forces to…
  • Intergenerational transmission of abuse and neglect more complicated than previously believed

    27 Mar 2015 | 10:35 am
    A study led by Cathy Spatz Widom, Distinguished Professor of Psychology at John Jay College, found that offspring of parents with histories of child abuse and neglect are themselves at risk for childhood neglect and sexual abuse but not physical abuse. Titled "Intergenerational Transmission of Child Abuse and Neglect: Real or Detection Bias?" the study's findings were reported in the March 27 issue of the journal Science. read more
  • Personality test finds Britain's most extroverted, agreeable and emotionally stable regions

    24 Mar 2015 | 7:01 pm
    A survey of almost 400,000 British residents has highlighted significant differences in personalities between regions. Amongst its finding, it shows Scots to be amongst the friendliest and most co-operative residents, Londoners the most open and Welsh people the least emotionally stable. read more
  • How much math, science homework is too much?

    23 Mar 2015 | 9:34 am
    When it comes to adolescents with math and science homework, more isn't necessarily better -- an hour a day is optimal -- but doing it alone and regularly produces the biggest knowledge gain, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. read more
 
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    Jonathan Rex

  • Le Palais Idéal

    jrex365
    29 Mar 2015 | 6:41 pm
    Ferdinand Cheval was a French  postman who dedicated 33 years of his life toward building a castle out of stones that he collected and molded together with lime, mortar and cement. One day while delivering mail he tripped over a rock and recalled a dream that he had years earlier of himself building a palace with caves. Picking the rock up he put it in his pocket and set out to bring his dream to life. The end result was  Le Palais Idéal (The Ideal Palace) in Hauterives, France. He originally wanted to be buried inside his palace but that was illegal according to French law so he…
  • Aniyunwiya

    jrex365
    26 Mar 2015 | 10:06 pm
    The word Cherokee is actually an English variant of the word Tsala’gi (Cha-la-gee) and meant “Mountain People”. On some of the earliest European explorers’ maps of the U.S. the Spanish and French labeled the Cherokee lands as “Chalaqui” and “Chalaki”, names that they had gotten from surrounding tribes they encountered first. Other tribes referred to the Tsala’gi as the Rikama’gi (Rick-ama-gee) which meant “Mountain Water People”. In 1776 when Tsiyu Gansini (Dragging Canoe) formed the Tsikama’gi (Chickamauga) in…
  • Abstract Nudes

    jrex365
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:20 pm
    Earlier this week I began working on a new style of abstract nudes with a friend of ours. The idea that I have is to drip different colors of hot candle wax onto the model’s body in different patterns, shoot photos of her body and then edit the images later in Photoshop. I’m not sure if this is going anywhere yet. The concept that I began with will probably evolve over time through trial and error, but these are the first two images that I created with her.
  • My First Model: Kaci

    jrex365
    14 Mar 2015 | 6:08 am
    During college I met Kaci in a class when we paired up together to work on a project. At some point during the project we got to talking about photography and she agreed to be my muse. Over the next couple years we worked together on numerous shoots ranging from suggestive nude portraits to more X-Rated photos. Hundreds of images, some of the best shots that we took together, were lost forever when my detachable hard drive crashed but among those that remain these are some of my favorites. Oddly enough they were the first ones that we took together. Having her willing to pose for me whenever…
  • Indian Givers

    jrex365
    8 Mar 2015 | 2:01 pm
    Excerpt from Indian Givers: How Native Americans Transformed the World by Jack Weatherford (with other references such as photos and quotes inserted by myself in bold letters): “Despite the ideal government sketched by Plato in The Republic, and the different constitutions analyzed by Aristotle in his Politics, the Old World offered America few democratic models for government. Democratic government had no fortress in the Old World. Despite the democratic rhetoric that came into fashion in eighteenth-century Europe, no such systems existed there at that time. The monarchy and the…
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