Sociology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Examples of under-enforced rules, laws, taboos, norms?

    Metafilter: Sociology
    mrmanvir
    4 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
    Hivemind! Does anyone know any examples of rules, regulations, laws, or norms that are under-enforced (e.g., violations go unpunished), leading the rule to completely destabilize (i.e., no one follows it)? I'm sure that there are A LOT of examples of this - stuff from any and all disciplines and scales would be welcome. I'm preferentially searching for unconventional examples (e.g., rules of children's games, supernaturally-sanctioned laws of hunter-gatherer bands) and I'm also looking especially for primary literature (e.g., experiments, case studies, etc.), but ultimately anything would be…
  • Why Don’t the Poor Rise Up?

    NYT > Sociology
    23 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Is it because the idea of the collective good has given way to ‘individualization’? Whatever happened to e pluribus unum?
  • The top 10 colleges for a major in sociology - USA TODAY College

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:58 pm
    USA TODAY CollegeThe top 10 colleges for a major in sociologyUSA TODAY CollegeSociology is the study of human social interactions. In order to fully understand social behaviors, students must have the ability to view the world through multiple lenses. Classes in economics, political science, psychology and history are blended
  • Water and Inequality

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:02 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer All living beings need water; it is perhaps the most universal of all needs. Water is also one of the key markers of inequality, locally and globally. It may be easily taken for granted, but when there is too little or too much water, it usually impacts people disproportionally based on wealth. Consider the following: According to the United Nations, 85 percent of the world’s population lives in the driest part of the world, and 783 million people do not have access to clean water. An estimated 147 to 650 million people worldwide are threatened by rising sea levels.
  • Whose idea was it to have an open bar at a lecture?

    Metafilter: Sociology
    Monochrome
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:13 pm
    I was watching a movie where a scene included an academic lecturing on her work. The event was a black tie affair and there was an open bar at the lecture. I suddenly realized that this is common in movies and I've actually been to something like that in real life. Why? Why do these events have a prominent bar? What's the rationale behind boozing up your audience? Is the bar an incentive to attend an otherwise dull presentation? Is a bar standard equipment for every black tie event? Is the presence of the bar an admission that adults need alcohol to function with strangers? If an open bar is…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • The top 10 colleges for a major in sociology - USA TODAY College

    1 Jul 2015 | 12:58 pm
    USA TODAY CollegeThe top 10 colleges for a major in sociologyUSA TODAY CollegeSociology is the study of human social interactions. In order to fully understand social behaviors, students must have the ability to view the world through multiple lenses. Classes in economics, political science, psychology and history are blended
  • Zandria Robinson, Univ. of Memphis professor: 'Whiteness is most certainly and ... - Washington Times

    30 Jun 2015 | 9:27 am
    Washington TimesZandria Robinson, Univ. of Memphis professor: 'Whiteness is most certainly and Washington TimesZandria Robinson, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Memphis, has parted ways with the university after she came under fire for a number of tweets in which she blasts “whiteness” and even equates it with terrorism. By Tuesday Twitter explodes with (false) reports that U of Memphis fired a professor. Why?Inside Higher EdTAXPAYER-FUNDED Professor: 'Whiteness' Is 'Terror,' Confederate Flag Daily CallerProf who tweeted 'whiteness is…
  • Over 400 Delhi University Final-Year Students Fail Sociology Exam - NDTV

    29 Jun 2015 | 4:16 pm
    Hindustan TimesOver 400 Delhi University Final-Year Students Fail Sociology ExamNDTVNew Delhi: At least 410 students of Delhi University colleges have failed in Sociology examination triggering protests by them alleging error in evaluation. While 250 out of 260 students of Shivaji college have failed the examination, 102 out of 120 Over 200 final-year DU students fail in SociologyHindustan TimesDU to act on sociology failuresTimes of IndiaMass failure in Sociology exam; DU announces re-evaluation freeDaily News & AnalysisThe Hindu -Daily Mail -The New Indian Expressall 26 news…
  • Sociology Lecturer Committed to Coaching Wrestling - CSUF News

    29 Jun 2015 | 9:18 am
    Sociology Lecturer Committed to Coaching WrestlingCSUF NewsThese days, in addition to his work as a youth wrestling coach, he's a part-time sociology lecturer at CSUF. He's always had an interest in sociology, graduating from CSUF with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology in 2010 and a Master of Arts in 2012. He
  • Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice Celebrates 2015 Achievements - University of Arkansas Newswire

    28 Jun 2015 | 10:21 pm
    University of Arkansas NewswireDepartment of Sociology and Criminal Justice Celebrates 2015 AchievementsUniversity of Arkansas NewswireFAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences announces several recent faculty accomplishments. The university community, along with members of the department of ...and more »
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Water and Inequality

    W. W. Norton
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:02 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer All living beings need water; it is perhaps the most universal of all needs. Water is also one of the key markers of inequality, locally and globally. It may be easily taken for granted, but when there is too little or too much water, it usually impacts people disproportionally based on wealth. Consider the following: According to the United Nations, 85 percent of the world’s population lives in the driest part of the world, and 783 million people do not have access to clean water. An estimated 147 to 650 million people worldwide are threatened by rising sea levels.
  • Religion, Climate Change, and Poverty

    W. W. Norton
    26 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman There is a new sociologist on the block: he does not have a Ph.D., does not teach at a university, and as far as I know, may have never even taken a sociology course. In fact, he attended a technical secondary school where he graduated with a chemical technician’s diploma and worked for a time in a chemistry lab (as well as working temporarily as a bouncer). Who is this new sociologist?  He’s an Argentinian named Jorge Mario Bergogli or, as he is commonly referred to, Pope Francis. Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pope_Francis_in_March_2013_b.jpg So…
  • Internships and Inequality

    W. W. Norton
    22 Jun 2015 | 10:12 am
    By Karen Sternheimer It’s summer break now for most students, many of whom are using this time to do a summer internship. Internships can be a great way to learn firsthand about what it’s like to work in a particular industry. They might be a foot in the door for future employment. Or they might be a costly waste of time. Let’s consider the best case scenario: an internship that is truly educational, giving the intern exposure to a field that they might not have gotten otherwise. Maybe they get paid hourly or a small stipend, make valuable connections and have something important to add…
  • Police Killings by the Numbers

    W. W. Norton
    16 Jun 2015 | 8:47 am
    By Peter Kaufman If there has been one dominant, sociologically-relevant story in the news lately, it has arguably been the treatment of African Americans by the police. From Michael Brown in Missouri to Eric Garner in Staten Island to the McKinney, Texas, swimming pool incident, there is a heightened awareness, an ongoing conversation, and a growing sentiment of anger about how race influences policing. As increasing attention has been devoted to this social problem, and more questions have been raised about it, there have been calls for greater accountability from law enforcement. In…
  • Mexican Pointy Boots and Subcultural Theory

    W. W. Norton
    12 Jun 2015 | 11:59 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales While looking for videos to share with my Urban Sociology course this past term, I came across a mini-documentary from 2012 on Vice that chronicles the rise of a cultural phenomenon that centers around extremely pointy boots. Men from the rural town of Matehuala, in San Luis Potosi, Mexico began augmenting their boots to make them pointier with an up-curved slant. While the boots initially were only slightly pointier, the trend expanded and some points increased as high as six feet tall. According to the documentary, the boot trend coincided with the rise of Tribal…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Whose idea was it to have an open bar at a lecture?

    Monochrome
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:13 pm
    I was watching a movie where a scene included an academic lecturing on her work. The event was a black tie affair and there was an open bar at the lecture. I suddenly realized that this is common in movies and I've actually been to something like that in real life. Why? Why do these events have a prominent bar? What's the rationale behind boozing up your audience? Is the bar an incentive to attend an otherwise dull presentation? Is a bar standard equipment for every black tie event? Is the presence of the bar an admission that adults need alcohol to function with strangers? If an open bar is…
  • Solid data on "messages received" increasing over time?

    Shepherd
    4 May 2015 | 2:33 pm
    I'm working on something with the sloppy premise that over the gradual shift from print to digital, communications isn't a zero-sum game. The general idea is that the introduction of things like first the Internet and e-mail, and later social media and texting, have increased the total number of messages people receive, and that people are increasingly "messaged at" over time. What sources can help me prove this, or disprove it? It feels like a common-sensey assumption, but might just be "truthy" (or even just wrong). It seems like something that should be quantifiable, as one can count…
  • Examples of norms that prohibit costly behavior and emerge informally?

    mrmanvir
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:43 am
    hivemind!!!! Does anyone know of any cases where a norm informally or organically arises that prohibits a behavior that is costly to others (i.e., has negative externalities) or demands that individuals do something to reduce costs for others? Examples that come to mind are norms against smoking and norms demanding that people cover their mouths when they sneeze. It would be especially great if anyone also knew of some literature about the emergence of the norm, especially in the form of academic articles, though stuff from newspapers, magazines, etc. would be rad too. Thanks!
  • Examples of under-enforced rules, laws, taboos, norms?

    mrmanvir
    4 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
    Hivemind! Does anyone know any examples of rules, regulations, laws, or norms that are under-enforced (e.g., violations go unpunished), leading the rule to completely destabilize (i.e., no one follows it)? I'm sure that there are A LOT of examples of this - stuff from any and all disciplines and scales would be welcome. I'm preferentially searching for unconventional examples (e.g., rules of children's games, supernaturally-sanctioned laws of hunter-gatherer bands) and I'm also looking especially for primary literature (e.g., experiments, case studies, etc.), but ultimately anything would be…
  • Are we more or less honest than a hundred years ago?

    mecran01
    12 Mar 2015 | 12:49 am
    Are the citizens of the U.S. more or less honest than a hundred years ago? Is there any longitudinal research that explores this question? I'm always hearing people decry the corruption and dishonesty of people in general, but from what I can tell, we have always been ripping each other off. Is there any solid research, like a workplace integrity test or something, that has been consistently administered over the last 50-100 years that could answer this question meaningfully?
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Uncommon Thought Journal

  • Washington’s “Two Track Policy” to Latin America: Marines to Central America and Diplomats to Cuba

    Rowan Wolf
    4 Jul 2015 | 5:24 am
    By Prof. James Petras[Graphic: Global Research.]Everyone, from political pundits in Washington to the Pope in Rome, including most journalists in the mass media and in the alternative press, have focused on the US moves toward ending the economic blockade of Cuba and gradually opening diplomatic relations.  Talk is rife of a ‘major shift’ in US policy toward Latin America with the emphasis on diplomacyand reconciliation.  Even most progressive writers and journals have ceased writing about US imperialism.However, there is mounting evidence that Washington’s negotiations with Cuba are…
  • Lower the US Flag on July Fourth! (Or: I’ll Take Down My Flag When You Take Down Yours!)

    Rowan Wolf
    3 Jul 2015 | 7:47 am
    By Gary CorseriI‘ve marched in the Civil Rights Movement. During the Vietnam War, I marched behind a Peace Symbol flag, and just happened to be in the flashbulb’s light when the Boston Globe reporter snapped his Cannon. My picture made it to the newspaper’s front page, which a war-supporting high-school administrator posted on the bulletin board in the faculty cafeteria with the caption: “Is this really the kind of character we want teaching our kids?” Some fellow anti-war faculty nodded surreptitious approval at me, but even more simply glowered.   (I couldn’t understand…
  • Baskin’s Generous Offer: Making Peace with Israeli Occupation

    Rowan Wolf
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:02 am
    By Ramzy Baroud[Baskin with Mahmoud Abbas. (Via Gershonbaskin.org)]It would be fair to assume that Gershon Baskin’s recent article in the Jerusalem Post – Encountering Peace: Obviously no peace now, so what then? (June 24) – is not a mere intellectual exercise aimed at finding ‘creative’ solutions to the Israeli occupation of Palestine.Baskin is a regular contributor to the Jerusalem Post, a rightwing newspaper. He is more or less embodied in the Israeli political establishment, otherwise, he would have never been allowed to initiate the “secret back channel for the release…
  • The Very, Very, Very Odd Arrest of Dylann Roof

    Rowan Wolf
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:45 am
    By Truthstream MediaIf you have not seen the raw arrest footage of Dylann Roof yet, you have to see this. No cops ever would act this way apprehending a possibly armed and dangerous mass shooter. There is no way anyone can tell us this event isn’t staged and scripted now.YouTube url: https://youtu.be/I_77laSEQv4
  • Beyond the Politics of Civility and Trauma: The End of Higher Education as We Know It

    Rowan Wolf
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:44 am
    By Henry A. Giroux, Contributing Editor[Photo of a sculpture (“Icemen”) by Brazilian artist Nele Azevado.]The academy is entering a dangerous time. Academics now find themselves entering a time when a more comprehensive politics that deals with the rise of authoritarianism through a variety of related fundamentalisms–economic, religious, political, and educational–is being overlooked as a result of an emerging limited and depoliticizing politics of civility and trauma. This is not meant to suggest that dehumanizing behavior and injurious forms of trauma do not matter and…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sociological Stew

  • Inequality, Global Warming and the Western Drought

    14 Jun 2015 | 5:23 pm
    It seems to me highly likely that the capitalist elite, the wealthy owners and controllers of large energy corporations such as the oil companies and people like the Koch brothers know full-well that global warming is real, that it is propelled by human carbon emissions, and its negative consequences like heat extremes, drought, rising oceans and severe weather extremes are real as well.  These are intelligent people, they have to be to manage their huge corporate and financial empires. They are certainly at least as intelligent as U.S. military leaders who have been convinced for years…
  • How much control do parents have?

    9 Nov 2014 | 5:30 pm
    I read a Facebook post this morning by a young woman I know - mother of two daughters - and found myself utterly surprised to find that I no longer agree with her position. She said:"With few exceptions, kids are the way they are because that's how they're being TRAINED. If we don't like the current situation, we must do something differently."I might have said that myself forty years ago as a young sociologist. We sociologists were trained to think primarily in terms of nurture, and to lay everything at the foot of the "socialization" process. But I've seen a lot in the past 40 years and…
  • confessions of a former optimist

    6 Sep 2014 | 6:56 pm
    I have always been an optimist. Or perhaps I should say I was always an optimist until the last few years. This has little or nothing to do with my personal life experiences. I maintained an optimistic outlook during unemployment, poverty, cancer, divorce, and many other personal trials, and recent years have been kind to my husband and I in many ways. Moreover, my optimism  was not based on ignorance of the worlds problems and issues. My parents brought me up to be highly aware of the dire circumstance of poverty, war, brutality, pain and suffering that others in the world…
  • Why the Rich Hate Obama

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:23 am
    This morning I ran across an article "The Best Worst President Ever" by Mark Morford in SF Gate.  Morford observes a wealthy beneficiary of the economy under Obama proclaim Obama the "worst president ever." Morford then proceeds to give a litany of economic facts that provide ample evidence that this wealthy individual is almost certainly benefiting greatly from the economy during Obama's presidency. In the end Morford just laughs, and shakes his head at the "bizarre lament" of these crazy rich bastards. His only explanation is simple racism - rich white guys can't stand it that a black…
  • The Truths Hidden in Right Wing Survivalism

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    On a right wing web page, every other headline screams that Obama is responsible for impending disaster and doom to American society.  But hidden within the polarizing rhetoric is often startlingly accurate analysis of the real sources of the problems and the dangers facing America today: a capitalist economic system that enshrines greed and wanton wealth accumulation over economic and social stability and human needs. This short video is typical of the genre aimed at "patriots" and emphasizing individualism and family it provides a surprisingly fact based and astute analysis of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    scatterplot

  • new guidelines for transparent and open research

    Dan Hirschman
    25 Jun 2015 | 12:27 pm
    The journal Science has just published details about a new framework for encouraging better scientific research and publishing practices, titled Transparent and Openness Promotion Guidelines. The New York Times has the story here, including a quick description: The guidelines include eight categories of disclosure, each with three levels of ascending stringency. For example, under the category “data transparency,” Level 1 has the journal require that articles state whether data are available, and if so, where. Level 2 requires that the data be posted to a trusted databank. Level 3…
  • sjmr ama

    shakha
    23 Jun 2015 | 8:47 am
    I recently did an AMA (ask me anything) at SJMR. It was fun but hugely time consuming. In it I mentioned a “acknowledgement letter” from my time doing my ethnographic research. They couldn’t post it. So I decided I’d do it here.
  • if your business model requires that your employees not be recognized as employees, maybe you need a new model?

    Dan Hirschman
    17 Jun 2015 | 8:58 am
    A California court just ruled that Uber drivers are employees. Here’s the (pro-Uber) coverage from Business Insider. Note how the story accepts Uber’s versions of the facts about who counts as an employee: Right now, Uber has hardly any costs other than its 1,000+ employees in its San Francisco headquarters. Uber takes a percentage of every ride (20-30%). It doesn’t employ drivers, it merely connects supply (user requests on its app) with demand (independent contract drivers who are roaming around and have agreed to partner with Uber). If this ruling sticks, Uber won’t…
  • plain-language harassment policy

    olderwoman
    16 Jun 2015 | 1:36 pm
    My university’s sexual harassment and consensual relations policies are written in bureaucratic legalese. Here’s my attempt to create a departmental plain-language statement. Comments appreciated. The plain language version of our policy is: Don’t date your students, and don’t try to date your students. There are no conditions under which it is acceptable for you to date a student in your class. This includes cases where the student takes the initiative: if a student asks you on a date, or makes romantic overtures to you, you must decline. Moreover, even if you imagine that…
  • ask a scatterbrain: supporting students on the job market.

    jessica
    10 Jun 2015 | 6:55 am
    I am wrapping up my second year as DGS in my department. Over the last couple years I’ve made some small, but significant changes in our grad program and I’m finally beginning to see the results. Now that I’ve found my sea legs (just in time for my term to end next summer), I’m ready to tackle something new: improving our support for students on the market. I think back to the limited formalized resources for students on the market in my grad program, but I also remember the rich informal support of friends who were going through it with me, others who had been there,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    potlatch

  • who wants to know?

    Will
    30 Jun 2015 | 2:45 am
    The great mystery of our present behaviorist-digital moment, with all of its attendent surveillance, constraints and cultural impoverishments, is the question of why we not only submit to it, but actively embrace it. Given that Western societies continue to conceive of themselves as 'liberal', in the sense of being founded on some sense of contract between free individuals and a coercive state (regardless of how plausible this characterisation is), the rush to a future of 'smart' objects and 'predictive' software would appear to contradict core tenets of who we…
  • Discussing The Happiness Industry in NYC & Philadelphia

    Will
    21 Apr 2015 | 3:41 am
    I'm going to be in the US for the first week of June, for a few events where I'll be discussing my forthcoming book, The Happiness Industry. All the details of where and when are on the Verso website here. Drop me a line if you'd like to know more or meet up while I'm over.
  • The Happiness Industry - out in May

    Will
    2 Apr 2015 | 9:28 am
    For those blissfully absent from the twitter-sphere, I have a new book out in May (and since you're such twitter refuseniks, you're probably still neurologically capable of reading such things). It's called The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Wellbeing. It'll be available in most book-shops, and online via non-tax-dodging-bastard websites such as Housmans Online. I will be speaking about the book at a few events over the course and May and June, including one or two in the US. I'll stick the dates for these things, along with other articles…
  • the society of exit

    Will
    26 Mar 2015 | 3:50 am
    If death used to be a 'great career move' for rockstars - if only that were still the case - it is hard to escape the sense that being axed is now a 'great career move' for the mega-celebrities, who occupy the intermediary space between the secretive private jets of the billionaires and the spectacles of broadcast media and major sports. In the UK, Jonathan Ross and Kevin Pietersen are two examples of this. Jeremy Clarkson is clearly another. These individuals represent a particular class of celebrity: hugely rich, 'talented' in the sense of willing to 'be…
  • new article: from cigarettes to smartphones

    Will
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:16 am
    I have a new piece in openDemocracy, exploring cultural and economic transitions, via the shift from a society of cigarettes to one of smartphones. Here's a chunk: ...on a deeper psychological and cultural level, the difference between these two framing devices could scarcely be more profound. This touches on the malaise of anxiety that has become the dominant psychiatric disorder of our age. While smoking affirms the limits of time and space around us, smart phones do precisely the opposite. While one allows you to spend a finite chunk of time in a given space, as a break from the flux…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    orgtheory.net

  • a lack of sight doesn’t mean a lack of vision

    fabiorojas
    4 Jul 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Just cuz I love y’all. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street
  • how to write a book 2: the publication process

    fabiorojas
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:01 pm
    The book publication process is very different than journal publishing. The journal process is fairly impersonal and bureaucratic. Yes, once in a while, an editor will help out his buddies, but journals receive hundreds of submissions and they have to be processed. Most are judged impersonally (though with the editors’ tastes). In contrast, book publication is a very soft, often personal process. Some book publication histories resemble the journal process. You send it in, the editor sends it out for review, and then the reviews determine if it gets published. In other cases, editors…
  • how to write a book 1: the mindset

    fabiorojas
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Today and tomorrow, I will discuss book writing. Today’s post will be about the basic mindset behind book writing. Most academics are trained to write articles. In some fields, an article might be a few pages long, or a few dozen pages. Books are longer and more ambitious in scope. Their length and sustained argument is a challenge and many academic are not able to complete such a book due to training or temperament. So here, I want to outline some key differences and help you get in the mindset about writing a book: Books are not about narrow nitty gritty arguments. They are sustained…
  • when anarchism is a decent option: the case of somalia

    fabiorojas
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Africanists like to toss around the words “failed state.” But what they falsely assume is that there is only one option – building a stronger state. What would happen if the state just withered and people just let it go? Are people better off by just ditching the weak state? A 2006 article in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization by Benjamin Powell, Ryan Ford, and Alex Nowratseh asks exactly this question. They ask, what happened in Somalia after their state collapsed 1991? Somalia is a nation that was hammered by war, famine, dictators, and an out of control…
  • book naming contest

    fabiorojas
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:01 pm
    For about five years now, I have been working on and off on a social theory book. The purpose is to explain to a wide audience what it is that sociologists do. A number of readers have read drafts of the book and provided valuable feedback. The book has a new editor who has very strongly suggested a new title of the book. The old title was “All of Sociology in Four E-Z Steps!!!” But what should the new title be? Here is my first stab: Theory for the Working Sociologist – How to Understand Contemporary Sociology. Can you do better? You probably can. Use the comments section.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Can Republicans Talk About Race Now?

    3 Jul 2015 | 1:58 pm
    July 3, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonA blogger I know (his post is here) caught Garrison Keillor in a historical inaccuracy at the beginning of last Saturday’s episode of “A Prairie Home Companion.” Commenting on recent political events, Keillor said, Republicans came out against the Confederacy after 150 years. They came out against it. It was not a good idea. It was not a good idea: A war in behalf of the institution of slavery.Keillor was confusing the Republicans of today with those of 1860.  Back then, anti-slavery forces were Republican, and they elected Lincoln. The war on…
  • Green Light, Red Light, 3-2-1

    30 Jun 2015 | 8:04 am
    June 30, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe good news about those countdown timers at pedestrian traffic lights is that they do what they’re supposed to do – save pedestrian lives and limbs.  The research on this comes from two economists, Arvind Magesam and Sacha Kapoor (here). You may have heard Shankar Vedantam reporting it on NPR a few days ago (here).The bad news is that while these timers are good for pedestriams, they are bad for cars. They increase car-on-car violence, and of a particular kind – rear-end collisions.  Economists Magesan and Kapoor think of an intersection…
  • Stateways v. Folkways; Alito v. Roberts

    27 Jun 2015 | 7:09 am
    June 27, 2015Posted by Jay Livingston“Stateways cannot change folkways.”* Or can they? That’s an empirical question, and it figures briefly in two of the dissents in the Supreme Court’s gay-marriage decision yesterday.Chief Justice Roberts (Dread Justice Roberts – except for an occasional Obamacare decision) and Justice Alito both dissented. Their arguments were mostly about the Constitution. But both also made stateways/folkways predictions about the effects the decision would have on public opinion.Justice Roberts went sociologist Sumner one better. The law would change public…
  • Character or Structure – The David Brooks Temptation

    26 Jun 2015 | 6:39 am
    June 26, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonI was on jury duty this week, and the greatest challenge for me was the David Brooks temptation. I found myself on the verge of using that experience to expound on the differences in generations on the great changes in culture and character that technology and history have brought. I did my first tour of duty in the 1970s. Back then you were called for two weeks. Even if you served on a jury, after that trial ended, you went back to the main jury room. If you were lucky, you might be released after a week and a half. Now it’s two days.What most struck me…
  • YouThought So Too? I Had No Idea.

    24 Jun 2015 | 5:07 am
    June 24, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe governors of Virginia and South Carolina have now taken stands against the Confederate battle flag. So have honchos at Wal*Mart, Sears, Target, and NASCAR.NASCAR! How could this cascade of reversals have happened so rapidly? Did these important people wake up one morning this week and say to themselves, “Gee, I never realized that there was anything racist about the Confederacyand never realized that there was anything wrong with racism, till that kid killed nine Black people in a church,”?My guess is that what’s going on is not a sudden…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Sleeping Beauties in Philosophy

    27 Jun 2015 | 4:11 am
    The other day at Daily Nous, Justin asked about so-called “Sleeping Beauty” papers in Philosophy: “Sleeping Beauty” papers “lie dormant for years before experiencing a sudden spike in citations as they are discovered and recognized as important.” A recent article in Nature discussed scientific papers that have slumbered for decades … Are there sleeping beauty papers in philosophy? (I mean, of course, besides that paper of yours from a few years back that no one has cited…yet.) Which have slumbered the longest? Who was their “prince”? I’ve been doing some…
  • America's Ur-Choropleths

    12 Jun 2015 | 6:50 am
    Choropleth maps of the United States are everywhere these days, showing various distributions geographically. They’re visually appealing and can be very effective, but then again not always. They’re vulnerable to a few problems. In the U.S. case, the fact that states and counties vary widely in size and population means that they can be a bit misleading. And they make it easy to present a geographical distribution to insinuate an explanation. Together the results can be frustrating. Gabriel Rossman remarked to me a while ago that most choropleth maps of the U.S. for whatever…
  • Fake Science, Real Consequences

    20 May 2015 | 7:20 am
    This morning, Social Science Twitter is consumed by the discovery of fraud in a very widely-circulated political science paper published last year in Science magazine. “When contact changes minds: An experiment on transmission of support for gay equality”, by Michael LaCour and Donald Green, reported very strong and persistent changes in people’s opinion about same-sex marriage when voters were canvassed by a gay person. The paper appeared to have a strong experimental design and, importantly, really good follow-up data. Can a single conversation change minds on divisive…
  • ATP Shownote Data

    15 May 2015 | 11:18 am
    The hosts at Accidental Tech Podcast have been thinking about how to broaden their base of listeners to include more women. Good for them. They’re getting plenty of advice (and a certain amount of flak), which I won’t add to. But in general when doing this kind of thing it can be helpful to look back on what your past practice has been. For example, it can be useful to audit one’s own habits of linking and engagement. Often exclusion is less a matter of explicit boundary policing (though God knows there’s enough of that in the tech sector) and more a matter of passive…
  • UK Election Miscellany

    14 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    This UK Election data is really too much fun to play around with. Here’s a (probably final) collection of pictures. First, a map of the turnout (that is, the percentage of the electorate who actually voted) by constituency, with London highlighted for a bit more detail. Constituencies by Turnout. There’s a strong suggestion here that Labour areas have lower turnout. Here’s a scatterplot of all seats showing the winning candidate’s share of the electorate plotted against turnout. Winner's share of Electorate v Turnout. You can see here that Scotland turned out to…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Usurper

    Ahlswede Collection
    4 Jul 2015 | 5:16 pm
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usurper
  • Punishment

    Ahlswede Collection
    4 Jul 2015 | 4:21 pm
    “Punishment” on @Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punishment?wprov=sfia1
  • The Roots of Discrimination

    writeforthemasses
    4 Jul 2015 | 3:33 pm
    I’ve been having trouble deciding whether there has been a sudden uproar of prejudice and discrimination in the United States, or whether I am just now paying attention to it. This issue seems insignificant when one begins to think of how to eradicate discrimination. I am inclined to say that it is simply a part of human nature on all levels, but when we further understand the roots of discrimination the more we can work chisel away at it to its lowest forms. I’ve noticed one feature in every discriminatory person I’ve met: ignorance. It is the lack of understanding…
  • Summer blogging challenge; Day 4

    BearNextDoor
    4 Jul 2015 | 3:19 pm
    Today’s prompt is Friends. Friendship is such an amazing thing, honestly -especially when you have friends for life. Your friends are like your second family. If you’re anything like me, you can tell them all the things you can’t tell your parents. You can rely on them to pick up the phone when you call (okay, that’s a lie – my friends never pick up their phones (actually, that’s a lie)). With me, me and my friends constantly argue over trivial things (I say O-ven they say Uh-ven) which, I think, helps us get through the bigger issues. Enough about me,…
  • Marxists Wax Nostalgic Re. Marx and US Independence

    Ameriviking
    4 Jul 2015 | 11:29 am
    As a non-Marxist socialist, I always find the infighting amongst Marxist doctrinaires amusing. The following is a brief excerpt from a Marxist tête–à–tête on a Jacobin Magazine post on Facebook dated July 4 related to, what else a Jacobin article on whose independence day he historically have celebrated. As follows: To hell with the psychobabble. The US revolution in itself was not good for most whites, and zero for blacks, natives, and Women. Later progressive “revolutionary actions” are what should be celebrated. And while we are at it . . . fuck Marx! Yeah…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Human brain study by UCLA and UK researchers sheds light on how new memories are formed

    2 Jul 2015 | 10:34 am
    In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases. read more
  • When times are tough, parents favor daughters over sons

    2 Jul 2015 | 4:34 am
    In tough economic times, parents financially favor daughters over sons, according to researchers at the Carlson School of Management and Rutgers Business School. Their study, forthcoming in the Journal of Consumer Research, found participants preferred to enroll a daughter rather than a son in beneficial programs, preferred to give a U.S. Treasury bond to a daughter rather than a son, and bequeathed a greater share of their assets to female offspring in their will when they perceived economic conditions to be poor. read more
  • Sleep deprivation could reduce intrusive memories of traumatic scenes

    1 Jul 2015 | 8:36 am
    A good night's sleep has long been recommended to those who have experienced a traumatic event. But an Oxford University-led study provides preliminary experimental work suggesting it could actually be the wrong thing to do. read more
  • Patients with recurrent depression have smaller hippocampi

    1 Jul 2015 | 8:36 am
    The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus - the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories - than healthy individuals, a new global study of nearly 9,000 people reveals. read more
  • Report: Careers outside of academia are richly rewarding for Ph.D. physicists

    1 Jul 2015 | 7:11 am
    When asked to picture someone with a PhD in physics, most people probably envision an academic in a lab -- and not, say, a CEO or a financial analyst. In reality, though, physicists aren't limiting themselves to the ivory tower. Out of necessity or choice, many leave academia for jobs in the private sector, pursuing careers that are traditionally not tracked in workforce surveys of the physics field. read more
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Well Written Documents

  • Illiteracy in Alameda County… (Quiet as It’s Kept)

    Charlene Rossell
    14 Jun 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Illiteracy as a State of Being Burdened by illiteracy, an elderly man enters a primary school because he was denied a basic education as a child in the movie called The First Grader.  Now, in his late years, he receives … Continue reading →
  • Fictional Writer, Carrie Bradshaw, on The Pen Versus Love

    Charlene Rossell
    23 May 2014 | 8:00 am
    Writing About Love is a Universal Effort Every great writer, fictional writer or a real-life professional writer, has tried his or her hand at writing about love at one point or another. It has become a topic that stands as an epic abstract … Continue reading →
 
Log in