Sociology

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  • Smelling Liberal, Thinking Conservative

    NYT > Sociology
    4 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Your scent reveals your innate belief system.
  • Meet Vicki Van Patten, Western Michigan University 2014 Homecoming Court

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:24 am
    Hannah Ball A&E Editor Vicki Van Patten The raindrops on Vicki Van Patten’s umbrella represent the different organizations she is involved with. Courtesy photo from Vicki Van Patten.   Major: sociology Minor: communication studies Favorite Junk Food: chips and queso …
  • Who is a Low Wage Earner?

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer The mayor of Los Angeles has proposed increasing the minimum wage to $13.25 an hour in the city, and requested an analysis of the potential impact an increase would have on workers and businesses.  Researchers from UC Berkeley’s Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics produced a report and concluded that more than a half a million workers in the city would get a raise (those earning minimum wage and those earning below the proposed minimum wage). The report provides a demographic profile on these low-wage workers. They comprise 37 percent of those earning wages in…
  • Book Review Symposium: JK Gibson-Graham, Jenny Cameron and Stephen Healy, Take Back the Economy: An Ethical Guide for Transforming Our Communities

    SagePub: Sociology
    North, P.
    14 Oct 2014 | 8:34 am
  • A Sociology of the Seasons?

    Keele University: Sociology Staff
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    By Dr Andy ZieleniecAs a sociologist of culture or a cultural sociologist I am interested in the various ways in which we make and represent meaning to ourselves and to others. How we create and share and reflect on the present connected to the past and predicting, hoping and aspiring to some vision of the future. We do this within social contexts in which our material and physical environments also impact and influence our understanding of the social processes, forms and structures that affect our experiences of being in the world. An intrinsic part of this is how we interact with…
 
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    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Meet Vicki Van Patten, Western Michigan University 2014 Homecoming Court

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:24 am
    Hannah Ball A&E Editor Vicki Van Patten The raindrops on Vicki Van Patten’s umbrella represent the different organizations she is involved with. Courtesy photo from Vicki Van Patten.   Major: sociology Minor: communication studies Favorite Junk Food: chips and queso …
  • Teacher of Psychology & Sociology, Central Bedfordshire

    17 Oct 2014 | 1:01 pm
    Sandy Upper School is located in the market town of Sandy in Bedfordshire.
  • Alamon: A bid for relevance

    16 Oct 2014 | 12:50 pm
    FROM October 16-18, 2014, sociologists from all over the country and abroad are assembling at the Mindanao State University-General Santos for the annual Philippine Sociological Society National Conference. I have been looking forward to this meeting of kindred spirits and critical minds.
  • Teacher of Sociology, Lewisham

    5 Oct 2014 | 12:51 am
    We are seeking to appoint a permanent full-time teacher of Sociology to join our highly successful faculty. Prendergast Ladywell School is a non-selective 11-16 comprehensive school.
  • How Do Aliens Think? We Need To Learn About Their Biology First, Analyst Argues

    3 Oct 2014 | 5:41 am
    TORONTO, CANADA – Should E.T. finally give Earth a ring, it’s not only important to understand what the message says but why it is being sent, a speaker at a talk about extraterrestrials urged this week. This requires understanding about alien social behavior, also known as sociology. “We keep complaining about the fact that we […]
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Who is a Low Wage Earner?

    W. W. Norton
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer The mayor of Los Angeles has proposed increasing the minimum wage to $13.25 an hour in the city, and requested an analysis of the potential impact an increase would have on workers and businesses.  Researchers from UC Berkeley’s Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics produced a report and concluded that more than a half a million workers in the city would get a raise (those earning minimum wage and those earning below the proposed minimum wage). The report provides a demographic profile on these low-wage workers. They comprise 37 percent of those earning wages in…
  • Understanding Violence Sociologically

    W. W. Norton
    14 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman Violence is ubiquitous. We see it in television shows, movies, video games, and advertisements; we read about it in news articles, magazines, and books; we speak about it—both literally when we recount what’s happening in the world, but more often figuratively with an array of violent phrases that pervade our everyday speech;  we fear it with our security systems, gun purchases, and police forces; and we experience it, directly or indirectly, in our homes, schools, communities, workplaces, playing fields, and battlefields. Source:…
  • Sociology, Sidewalks, and Walking

    W. W. Norton
    10 Oct 2014 | 12:23 pm
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales If a city’s streets look interesting, the city looks interesting; if they look dull, the city looks dull. (Jane Jacobs). Have you ever noticed that your walking pace changes depending on where you’re walking, and where you’re walking to? Have you noticed that walking involves an interaction with space as you’re moving through it? I love walking, I love walking quickly, and I love walking on sidewalks. Even though sidewalks lead to paths already known, they also provide an opportunity for one to really look at the surroundings, notice shifts within social life…
  • Sociology, Murals, and Communities

    W. W. Norton
    6 Oct 2014 | 4:59 pm
    By Sally Raskoff Have you seen any murals in your community? If so, do you know what they depict? Do you know the history behind them? Finding such murals can be a good exercise for your sociological imagination. There is one mural right next door to my college: The Great Wall of Los Angeles. It is a half-mile long, located along the interior wall of the Los Angeles River – yes, our river runs within a concrete channel, built to control the unruly flow of water. With our current state of drought, however, we don’t have much water flowing so we can see the entire mural! Photo courtesy of…
  • Social Interaction and Drought Shaming

    W. W. Norton
    2 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer There is currently a severe drought in California, and this summer new rules went into effect to conserve water. For instance, a water feature (like a fountain) must re-circulate the same water. You cannot hose down the sidewalk, nor can you wash your car with a hose that doesn’t have a shutoff nozzle. Your lawn cannot be watered between 9 am and 5 pm (to limit evaporation). A violation of these new rules could result in a $500 ticket. Authorities can’t possibly police every violation, so they are hoping that the public helps by complying and asking neighbors to…
 
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • A Sociology of the Seasons?

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    By Dr Andy ZieleniecAs a sociologist of culture or a cultural sociologist I am interested in the various ways in which we make and represent meaning to ourselves and to others. How we create and share and reflect on the present connected to the past and predicting, hoping and aspiring to some vision of the future. We do this within social contexts in which our material and physical environments also impact and influence our understanding of the social processes, forms and structures that affect our experiences of being in the world. An intrinsic part of this is how we interact with…
  • Stiegler’s University

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:21 am
    On Wednesday the first Sociology / Social Policy research seminar of the new academic year is scheduled. Mark Featherstone will talk about his recent work, 'Stiegler's University':Wednesday, 22nd October12pm-1pmCBC0.005AbstractIn this paper I read Stiegler’s work on youth, and especially his discussion of attention from Taking Care of Youth and the Generations, and the decadent society, formulated across three volumes of Disbelief and Discredit, through the lens of the contemporary university in order to develop a theory of the potentially utopian and dystopian conditions of higher…
  • Using Twitter in Sociology Teaching and Learning – Research Project Launch!

    9 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Today sees the launch of a new research project titled ‘Using Twitter in Sociology Teaching and Learning'. The project is being led by Dr Emma Head and Dr Ala Sirriyeh, and is funded by Keele's Teaching Innovation Project Scheme. The objectives of this investigation are to firstly assess the use of Twitter as a tool to promote enhanced student learning and engagement on a sociology module and, secondly, to explore the role of social media in the education and wider lives of undergraduate students.  The research will evaluate the use of Twitter as a teaching and learning tool in a…
  • The Big Sociology Project: Welcome Week 2014 at Keele

    3 Oct 2014 | 2:03 am
    By Dr Ala Sirriyeh, Lecturer in Sociology  It has been a great pleasure this week to welcome the wonderful new first year Sociology students to Keele. As part of the Welcome Week activities, on Thursday we ran a workshop titled ‘The Big Sociology Project’. This workshop was in the style of a 'treasure hunt' and was essentially aimed at getting students involved in the practice of ‘being sociological’. The project introduced them to thinking about what sociology is and also about how you ‘do’ sociology by conducting a mini sociological study of Keele and the surrounding area.
  • New paper by Guy Woolnough: Blood Sports in Victorian Cumbria

    24 Sep 2014 | 3:41 am
    By Dr Guy WoolnoughIn researching the primary sources for my doctorate at Keele, I found many fascinating details which were peripheral to my main narrative, but were too good to forget. Completion of my thesis has given me the time to revisit some of these stories. The Journal of Victorian Culture has published the resulting article.  I was intrigued by the policing of two bare-knuckle fights in rural Westmorland (Cumbria). Jem Mace, a celebrated ‘world champion’ of prize-fighting, brought on two occasions a train with two pugilists and a full complement of supporters from…
 
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    scatterplot

  • badges

    jeremy
    19 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Don’t these badges look nifty? You can display them girl-scout style at the top of your article if it fulfills various open science practices. Should quant sociology have something like this? (Nothing against my qual-pals, just harder to see how it would work.)
  • asa renewal – now with social media

    tina
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:21 pm
    Look! When you renew your ASA membership, there are now fields for you to enter your Twitter, handle, blog address, or other social media info. This is something that we requested on the Task Force on Social Media (now the Task Force on Engaging Sociology) that was begun by President Annette Lareau last year to improve the ASA’s engagement with social media. If you input your Twitter handle here, for example, the ASA can include the info on our nametags at the conference, create a list of sociologists’ blogs, etc. It is all optional, of course.
  • data disclosure checklist

    jeremy
    17 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Happened across the data disclosure checklist required by Management Science. So simple! Indicate (e.g., by underlining) “Yes” or “No”: Yes No - This manuscript includes analysis of data (e.g., field data, simulated data, experimental data, primary data, secondary data, public data, private data, etc.). Yes No - If our manuscript is accepted we will provide the journal with our data so that it can be posted on the journal’s website. To promote additional research and to increase the credibility of a paper’s findings, data disclosure is encouraged but not required. Yes No - A…
  • reflexive anti-geneticism

    andrewperrin
    16 Oct 2014 | 9:01 am
    This is my contribution to the ongoing symposium on genetics,race, and sociological theory as well as its twin on that other blog. A quick disclaimer: I was in graduate school with J. Shiao, lead author of the paper being discussed, and we talk occasionally at conferences. My view of the original paper is that its contribution is real but quite modest in the scheme of theory. The best way to read it is as a social-constructionist “friendly amendment” to constructivism’s tacit, yet stubborn, insistence that there is no biological basis for racial categorization. Genetic…
  • granovetter rejection!

    shakha
    13 Oct 2014 | 7:14 am
    You may think I’m talking about the Nobel. But I’m not. Here is the 1969 rejection letter and reviews of an early version of Granovetter’s “the strength of weak ties” paper. It was rejected by ASR. I asked Mark if I could share this; he agreed. He also wrote, “I’d note also that this rejection illustrates the importance of framing. I framed the original draft, which I wrote in grad school, as a treatment of “alienation”, more or less in response to the ideas of Louis Wirth and others that the city was an “alienating” place. The…
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    potlatch

  • against the neo-behaviorists

    Will
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:31 am
    The LSE Impact Blog have been hosting a debate on the future of the social sciences, in anticipation of this event tomorrow evening, with Nicholas Christakis, whose article on the need to 'shake up' the social sciences made a bit of a stir last year. A more recent article by Amanda Goodall and Andrew Oswald lept enthusiastically aboard Christakis's bandwagon, from a British context. The tenor of this debate irks me. It employs the rhetoric of 'modernity' and 'anti-conservatism' in a similar way to Tony Blair, namely, to back all critics into corners where they do…
  • The Limits of Neoliberalism discussions

    Will
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    As part of the slow-burning promotion of my book, a couple of discussions have been published in recent weeks, exploring the book's arguments. Firstly, New Left Project published a two-part interview I did with Tom Mills, one of their editors. These can be read here [pt 1] and here [pt 2]. Secondly, Renewal organised a symposium of critical reviews of the book, with a response from me. I was really delighted with the quality of these commentaries from Bob Jessop, Stephanie Mudge and Jonathan Derbyshire. You can download the pdf of this symposium here. 
  • in praise of family existentialism

    Will
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    When it comes to the cultural injunctions of the Guardian and Radio 4, I'm pretty obedient. In the past couple of weeks, I've seen Richard Linklater's film Boyhood and ploughed through most of the second volume of Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle. The parallels are very striking, as many have noticed. On a superficial level, they include an attention to minor, arguably banal details of everyday life; a preoccupation with family and the parent-child relationship; a length that runs the risk of boredom; an absence of plot, conventionally understood; and above all, a heroic…
  • Listen to Big Ideas - what is neoliberalism?

    Will
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:31 am
    The Big Ideas event I spoke at on 'What is neoliberalism?' on Tuesday night turned out to be great fun, with unusually good questions and contributions from the audience. In case anybody would like to listen, here is a recording. It includes my talk, which lasts just over half an hour, and then an hour-long discussion.
  • Big Ideas discussion - What is Neoliberalism? - 29th July

    Will
    1 Jul 2014 | 2:06 am
    I'll be speaking at the next Big Ideas event, at the Wheatsheaf pub, 25 Rathbone Place, London, at 8pm on Tuesday 29th July. These events are organised by Andrew McGettigan, and take place on the last Tuesday of every month, for anyone who wants to turn up and discuss ideas. I'll be speaking on the topic 'What is neoliberalism?', and the blurb is here: It is often argued that, starting with the Reagan and Thatcher governments in the 1980s, economic policy-making around the world has become dominated by ‘neoliberalism’. This tends to imply something about free markets, but…
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    orgtheory.net

  • history, the stock market, and predicting the future

    epopp
    20 Oct 2014 | 4:01 am
    So the stock market has been freaking out a bit the last couple of weeks. Secular stagnation, Ebola, a five-year bull market—who knows why. Anyway, over the weekend I was listening to someone on NPR explain what the average person should do under such circumstances (answer: hang tight, don’t try to time the market). This reminded me of one of my pet quibbles with financial advice, which I think applies to a lot of social science more generally. For years, the conventional wisdom around what ordinary folks should do with their money has gone something like this. Save a lot. Put it in…
  • race and genomics: comments on shiao et al.

    fabiorojas
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Shiao et al in Sociological Theory the symposioum, Scatterplot’s discussion, Andrew Perrin’s comments, last week’s discussion. Last week, I argued that many sociologists make a strong argument. Not only are social classifications of race a convention, but there is no meaningful clustering of people that can be derived from physical or biological traits. To make this claim, I suggested that one would need to have a discussion of what meaningful traits would include, get a huge sample people, and then see if there are indeed clusters. The purpose of Shaio et al (2012) is to…
  • fanfare for the common man

    fabiorojas
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:01 pm
    From DJ M&M: “”There isn’t anything common about this–the height of prog rock IMO. Also: I like the idea of making a music video in an empty stadium during winter.” From 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power
  • academia against interdisciplinary work

    fabiorojas
    16 Oct 2014 | 9:22 pm
    In response to Siri’s post about multi-disciplinary work, Peter Levin wrote the following: For what it’s worth, working in a corporate environment, on big hairy systemic questions like, ‘How can we design an ecosystem for technologies to support precision agriculture over the next 2 decades?’ I work with a psychologist, an engineer, two anthropologists, an MBA/physicist, and a French literature PhD. It’s a specifically-academia problem. I agree. But I want to add a few comments. First, the evidence indicates that the problem is worse in social sciences than physical sciences.
  • if sociology had an igm panel

    epopp
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:43 pm
    The IGM panel of economic experts got some recent buzz because 63% of their experts — 81%, when weighted by confidence — disagree with the Piketty-inspired argument that r > g is driving recent wealth inequality in the U.S. I always enjoy reading these surveys. The panel includes 50 or so top academic economists, from a variety of subfields and political orientations, and asks them whether they agree or disagree with a policy-relevant economic statement. Respondents answer on a Likert scale, and indicate their degree of certainty as well as their level of agreement.
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Hazing and Sexual Assault

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:55 am
    October 21, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonRandom thoughts on the Sayreville hazing. (If you are not familiar with this case, see yesterday’s Times article here.)1.  At least nobody is accusing the freshmen footballers of bring the assaults on themselves by dressing provocatively – those tight, shiny spandex-like pants, their torsos sometimes bare in the locker room. Nor is anyone saying, “if you don’t want seniors shoving their fingers up your butt, avoid being on the football team” the way women are told that if they don’t want to be raped, they shouldn’t drink too much at…
  • Names – The Last Shall Be First

    16 Oct 2014 | 11:17 am
    October 16, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWhat to name the baby has become more and more of a problem. A few generations ago, you could give a boy a name that had always been in the family. When is the last time your heard a parent call, “Junior, come here”?  Parents in a high-status family could give a son a family name as a first name. Calvin Trillin used to say that his upper-class Yale classmates in the 1950s were named things like Thatcher Baxter Hatcher, III (and had nicknames like Mutt and Biff).In more recent generations, parents have been choosing names the way they might…
  • World Standards and American Exceptionalism

    14 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    October 14, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonToday is World Standards Day. “The aim of World Standards Day is to raise awareness among regulators, industry and consumers as to the importance of standardization to the global economy.” It seems like a good idea, everyone using the same standards and measurements. It makes stuff like the Internet possible. It’s sort of like the metric system. Everything from machine parts to scientific reports made in one country can be used in any other country. Almost. Map of countries officially not using the metric systemAt least we’re in good company –…
  • Author or Economist - Greg Mankiw and the Principal-Agent Problem

    7 Oct 2014 | 11:19 am
    October 7, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonGreg Mankiw regularly comes to the moral and economic defense of the very, very, very rich (here for but one example). He himself is also rich (though without the verys) thanks in part to his best-selling economics textbook. (If you haven’t been a student for a while, that $286.36 is not a misprint.)Planet Money recently asked why college textbooks were so expensive (the $286 for Mankiw’s 7th edition at Amazon is actually $17 less than the price on the 6th edition). Their answer: the principal-agent problem. The student (i.e., the principal) …
  • Failed Prophecy and Sunk Costs

    3 Oct 2014 | 3:02 pm
    October 3, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonFour years ago, twenty-three economists (mostly conservative) signed a letter to Ben Bernanke warning that the Fed’s quantitative easing policy – adding billions of dollars to the economy – would be disastrous. It would “debase the currency,” create high inflation, distort financial markets, and do nothing to reduce unemployment.Four years later, it’s clear that they were wrong (as Paul Krugman never tires of reminding us). Have they changed their beliefs? Of course not. Bloomberg (here) asked the letter-signers what they now thought about…
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    chris uggen's weblog

  • Why Sex Offenders are Running for Office

    17 Oct 2014 | 11:40 am
    Locked Out (creative commons image by Jared Rodriguez)The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports that a group of "sex offenders" are registering to vote and plan to run for elected office. I put "sex offenders" in quotations because these voters and office-seekers are not currently under supervision for any crime. Instead, they are "civilly committed," which means that they have either already completed their criminal sentences or, as is the case for over 50 clients, they were never charged as an adult for a sex offense. Although they are euphemistically called "clients" rather than…
  • Which Prisoners Get Visitors?

    5 Aug 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better -- both while they're incarcerated and after they're released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation. The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure below shows, prisoners who are younger, white or…
  • Real Gutter Stories

    9 Jul 2014 | 8:52 am
    It takes courage to tell a big audience of strangers how your picture somehow ended up next to the headline "Drug Bust Nets Large Haul: Police Find Cocaine, Methamphetamine, and Viagra." The excellent Life of the Law podcast team brought a series of such painfully honest and powerful stories to the stage this summer. These two are my favorites, from two outstanding young scholars and friends.
  • Elliot Rodger and Violence Against Women

    24 May 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Shock, frustration, and rage. That's our reaction to the hate-filled video record that Elliot Rodger left behind. The 22-year-old, believed to have killed 6 people in Santa Barbara last night, left behind a terrible internet trail.I cannot and will not speculate about the "mind of the killer" in such cases, but I can offer a little perspective on the nature and social context of these acts. This sometimes entails showing how mass shootings (or school shootings) remain quite rare, or that crime rates have plummeted in the past 20 years. I won't repeat those reassurances here,…
  • Barney Kessel on Record Store Day

    19 Apr 2014 | 3:56 pm
    Oh sure, it is much easier to get your music online. And it is much cheaper to obtain it via "sharing," to borrow the kids' charming euphemism, rather than "paying." But neither experience can match the unexpected delight of holding a treasured obscurity in a real record store. And if said obscurity remains in good condition, it can fill your home with a sound that warms and glows like an actual log on an actual fire. On this national record store day, I hunted for a romantic big-guitar Barney Kessel album to take the damp chill from the air. A fitting choice, it turns out, given Mr.
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Income Inequality Anonymous

    Rising Window
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:58 am
     “Hello, my name is Sally. I am addicted to income inequality.”  Group: “Hello Sally.”  Group Leader
  • Income Inequality Anonymous

    jennifer
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:13 am
     “Hello, my name is Jennifer. I am addicted to income inequality.”  Group: “Hello Jennifer.”  Group Leader: “We’ve asked Jennifer here tonight to please tell us her story, how she deals with income inequality addiction.”  “Thank you for the invite Charis and Irene!”  “Well, my income inequality addiction began at a very early age. At five years of age I saw kids in my neighborhood receiving an allowance from their parents.  These friends of mine were able to buy gum, baseball cards, dolls, G rated Archie comic books, you name it. They bought it with their 25 cents or…
  • Dude, You're a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School by: C.J. Pascoe - Review"

    Gabrielle G - The Gift Of Gab
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:59 am
    C.J. Pascoe’s “Dude, You’re a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School”, analyzes the complexity of the term “faggot”. C.J. Pascoe explains that young adolescent boys use the word to demean and degrade another male’s character if the accused male isn’t participating in “manly” activities. “Manly” activities include: the gym or auto-car shops. “Faggot” activities occur in: orchestra productions and drama clubs. Anything to be considered a feminine activity is frowned upon to the accusers. The reason why the fag discourse is racialized is because in urban…
  • “Gangs and Social Change by: Martin Sanchez-Jankowski" - Review"

    Gabrielle G - The Gift Of Gab
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:39 am
    Martin Sanchez-Jankowski, the author of “Gangs and Social Change”, believes that the focus on individual differences to explain gang membership is misguided for several reasons. The first reason is immigration in which the children of immigrants would become frustrated living in lower-class environments that their parents might not have had to experience in their former locations. “Gangs have also developed in immigrant communities where the socio-economic mobility of the youth of these communities appears, in the 1990s, even more structurally blocked in the past.” (Gangs and Social…
  • What Is A Friend?

    vanessaserraosblog
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:34 am
    When you look at someone and see yourself in them. Not blood related, but you would kill for them. When your night turns to hell and you know you can count on that one person to get you through the heartache. When you don’t have any siblings, but you can call that one person your brother or sister. That special someone who goes out of their way for you to make sure they put a smile on your face, because a smile is priceless. To have someone be there for you. This a luxury. Quality is better than quantity. One should rather have less friends who are loyal than a million who only talk to you…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads

    21 Oct 2014 | 10:48 am
    Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help. read more
  • What americans fear most -- new poll from Chapman University

    21 Oct 2014 | 10:48 am
    Chapman University has initiated the first comprehensive nationwide study on what strikes fear in Americans in the first of what is a planned annual study. According to the Chapman poll, the number one fear in America today is walking alone at night. read more
  • Less-numerate investors swayed by corporate report presentation effects

    21 Oct 2014 | 10:47 am
    Publicly traded corporations are increasingly publishing social responsibility reports for investors, who now consider such information alongside traditional financial data before investing in a company. read more
  • 'Red effect' sparks interest in female monkeys

    17 Oct 2014 | 10:52 am
    Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our "red" reactions. read more
  • The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Gradual weight loss no better than rapid weight loss for long-term weight control

    16 Oct 2014 | 10:23 am
    Contrary to current dietary recommendations, slow and steady weight loss does not reduce the amount or rate of weight regain compared with losing weight quickly, new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology has found. read more
 
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    Well Written Documents

  • Blogs: The Coolest New Dating Tool

    Popular Articles Contributor
    23 Sep 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Blogs: The Coolest New Dating Tool by Sven Hylten-Cavallius It’s easy to discount blogs as simply tools for newshounds, people who like to gripe or sell things, or teenagers. But blogs and their siblings webcasts are actually a great way … Continue reading →
  • The Worst Mistakes Guys Make When Texting Ladies

    Charlene Rossell
    9 Sep 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Worst Mistakes Guys Make When Texting Ladies by Charlie Badderly It is so annoying when you meet a girl and think things are going great. A few texts later, and she’s disappeared and has fizzled out. Her loss right? … Continue reading →
  • Creative Writing For Kids, A Great Endeavour!

    Popular Articles Contributor
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Creative Writing For Kids, A Great Endeavour! by Rui Lim If you are one of the many parents who are seeking ways of helping your kids learn creative writing, and want them to enjoy writing, you are not alone! Writing … Continue reading →
  • A True Songwriter Pens Her Soul: How Adele has the Upper Hand

    Brianna Berry
    12 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Composition of a Songwriter Heartache is oftentimes the root of creativity, especially for a songwriter. Deep emotions provoke some of the most altruistic and open written lyrics that music has ever seen. It’s a given. From Michael Jackson to … Continue reading →
  • Motivational Writing: Michelle Obama Raps Up Child Obesity

    Hope Benefield
    5 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Healthy Motivation: “You’ve Got to Eat Right; You’ve Got to Work Hard” Michelle Obama is using motivational writing in a hip-hop album release to combat childhood obesity. The 19 track CD, “Songs for a Healthier America“, is part of the … Continue reading →
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