Sociology

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  • OkCupid’s Unblushing Analyst of Attraction

    NYT > Sociology
    6 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Christian Rudder, president of the online dating service OkCupid, says websites like his should conduct more research, not less, on users’ habits.
  • Non-citizens face harsher sentencing than citizens in US criminal courts

    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results
    30 Sep 2014 | 9:30 pm
    ( American Sociological Association ) Non-Americans in the US federal court system are more likely to be sentenced to prison and for longer terms compared to US citizens, according to a new study.
  • The Social Context Behind Street Food: Authenticity, Culture and Ethnicity

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    29 Sep 2014 | 11:42 am
    By Jonathan Wynn This weekend I went to go see the Jon Favreau movie, Chef. The film chronicles a chef’s fall from a gig at a high-end restaurant to rekindling his passion for food by operating a lowly food truck specializing in Cubanos and other Caribbean treats. Drawing from the explosion of interest in food trucks—due in part to the film’s co-producer, Roy Choi, owner of the real-life Korean-Mexican mash-up Kogi-BBQ trucks—the film is a love letter for simple, working class food as “authentic cuisine.” Favreau’s chef, however, doesn’t offer the same kind of inventive spin…
  • Why were people so scared of "juvenile delinquents" in the 1950s?

    Metafilter: Sociology
    suburbanbeatnik
    20 Sep 2014 | 1:23 am
    I've been fascinated with 1950s-1960s stuff for a long time, and for just as long I've accepted that people back then were fascinated with evil, misbehaving youth, and indeed thought that "JDs" were a Huge Problem in Society (i.e. West Side Story, Blackboard Jungle, or Rebel Without A Cause). Yet it also seems people were genuinely terrified of Teens Gone Bad, in a way it's hard to wrap my modern brain around. But how did this come about? Why were so people scared of "juvenile delinquents," and why was this considered a societal problem on par with battling Communism? I started looking around…
  • New paper by Guy Woolnough: Blood Sports in Victorian Cumbria

    Keele University: Sociology Staff
    24 Sep 2014 | 3:41 am
    By Dr Guy WoolnoughIn researching the primary sources for my doctorate at Keele, I found many fascinating details which were peripheral to my main narrative, but were too good to forget. Completion of my thesis has given me the time to revisit some of these stories. The Journal of Victorian Culture has published the resulting article.  I was intrigued by the policing of two bare-knuckle fights in rural Westmorland (Cumbria). Jem Mace, a celebrated ‘world champion’ of prize-fighting, brought on two occasions a train with two pugilists and a full complement of supporters from…
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • The Social Context Behind Street Food: Authenticity, Culture and Ethnicity

    W. W. Norton
    29 Sep 2014 | 11:42 am
    By Jonathan Wynn This weekend I went to go see the Jon Favreau movie, Chef. The film chronicles a chef’s fall from a gig at a high-end restaurant to rekindling his passion for food by operating a lowly food truck specializing in Cubanos and other Caribbean treats. Drawing from the explosion of interest in food trucks—due in part to the film’s co-producer, Roy Choi, owner of the real-life Korean-Mexican mash-up Kogi-BBQ trucks—the film is a love letter for simple, working class food as “authentic cuisine.” Favreau’s chef, however, doesn’t offer the same kind of inventive spin…
  • Living with Strangers

    W. W. Norton
    25 Sep 2014 | 12:00 pm
    By Peter Kaufman  “You cannot know that you have a particular view of the world until you come in contact with differing views” (Inge Bell and Bernard McGrane, This Book is Not Required)  For two weeks in July I was living with a family of complete strangers. They spoke a language I barely understood, lived in a town I had never heard of that was nearly 2,500 miles away from my home, and they had cultural norms and practices that were quite different from my own.  I was in Costa Rica for one month studying Spanish and as a way to augment my learning—both in terms of…
  • The Child-Migrant Crisis, Stereotypes, and Immigration

    W. W. Norton
    22 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales On a recent trip to California from the Midwest, I decided to take advantage of the long flight to relax, read one of my Australian murder mystery novels, use my free drink ticket for a glass of wine, and eat a bar of dark chocolate. During the first hour of the five-hour flight, I settled in and began reading my e-book. The woman sitting to my left decided that she wanted to talk, and asked “So what do you think about all of this?!” I muttered that I didn’t know and went back to reading. Again the woman interrupted me and said “This, here read it. What do you…
  • A Sociological Guide for Succeeding in College

    W. W. Norton
    18 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman This fall, over twenty million students are enrolled in colleges and universities across the United States. Although many of these students will not major in sociology or even take a sociology course, they can still use some sociological insights to help them have an enriching college experience. Much like a post I wrote a few months ago about how sociological theory can help students after they graduate, this current post offers four sociologically-inspired maxims for successfully navigating the college terrain. 1. Develop Social Capital. Social capital is fancy sociological…
  • Ebola and the Construction of Fear

    W. W. Norton
    15 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    By Karen Sternheimer No doubt you have heard about the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa, which received heightened attention in the news after three Americans working as missionaries in Liberia contracted the virus. The first two, diagnosed in mid-August, become the topic of debate when they were given an experimental drug and airlifted home to the U.S. Some wondered why they received the drug, while thousands of those infected in Africa did not (it is currently considered experimental and apparently in very short supply). Others expressed concern that they would spread the disease in the…
 
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Why were people so scared of "juvenile delinquents" in the 1950s?

    suburbanbeatnik
    20 Sep 2014 | 1:23 am
    I've been fascinated with 1950s-1960s stuff for a long time, and for just as long I've accepted that people back then were fascinated with evil, misbehaving youth, and indeed thought that "JDs" were a Huge Problem in Society (i.e. West Side Story, Blackboard Jungle, or Rebel Without A Cause). Yet it also seems people were genuinely terrified of Teens Gone Bad, in a way it's hard to wrap my modern brain around. But how did this come about? Why were so people scared of "juvenile delinquents," and why was this considered a societal problem on par with battling Communism? I started looking around…
  • Introductory sources on biological classification

    carter
    9 Jun 2014 | 7:53 am
    I'm beginning a project that looks partly at biological classification, primarily in western science. I have no background in this, and so I'm digging around. I'm interested to know more about the current rules for nomenclature, and also to know more about historical, philosophical, sociological, knowledge practice, ethnographic, anthropological, science technology and society (STS), sociotechnical, etc., approaches to the study of biological classification. I'll take monographs, articles, papers, web sites, etc. I have access to a university library. What are some good sources that can…
  • Pool Side Social Sciences.

    Milau
    2 May 2014 | 6:04 am
    I'm leaving for a much deserved vacation. I will be spending a lot of time reading by the pool. I'm looking for good social science reads. I'm trying to plan a few books that I could bring on my next vacation (this month). I used to be a huge fan of fiction but have found myself struggling to get into it lately. Instead, I seem to spend my time reading in either sociology, anthropology or history. I'm looking for "empirical" reads, that is, books that are focused on lived experiences. I've read and enjoyed theoretical stuff (Bourdieu, Foucault, Rancière, Butler, etc), but am looking for…
  • Do homeless individuals have codes of conduct or rules?

    mrmanvir
    19 Apr 2014 | 4:28 pm
    I recently learned that the panhandlers in my city (Cambridge, MA) often share their food when they get big items and it made me wonder - do homeless individuals often have explicit or implicit rules, like "share when you get food" or "the person who's been homeless the longest gets the best spot"? What do you think happens if people break the rule? I'm sure there's a lot of variation both within and between cities, but if anyone has any thoughts, I'd really appreciate it!
  • Theory about Internet and judging personal probabilities already exist?

    WCityMike
    28 Mar 2014 | 4:37 pm
    I have an original pet theory I came up with a long time ago involving the Internet and how people judge probability. It probably would fall into the anthropological, sociological or psychological fields. I'm not intending to make this post to discuss the theory itself as a sort of "let's b.s. back and forth about my idea" kind of thing. Reason I'm posting is because I'd like to know if this theory already exists or is an application of something broader that already exists. Maybe it's a theory being applied onto the communications medium of the Internet of some older theory in one of the…
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • New paper by Guy Woolnough: Blood Sports in Victorian Cumbria

    24 Sep 2014 | 3:41 am
    By Dr Guy WoolnoughIn researching the primary sources for my doctorate at Keele, I found many fascinating details which were peripheral to my main narrative, but were too good to forget. Completion of my thesis has given me the time to revisit some of these stories. The Journal of Victorian Culture has published the resulting article.  I was intrigued by the policing of two bare-knuckle fights in rural Westmorland (Cumbria). Jem Mace, a celebrated ‘world champion’ of prize-fighting, brought on two occasions a train with two pugilists and a full complement of supporters from…
  • New paper by Clare Griffiths on immigration, communities and social order

    18 Sep 2014 | 8:20 am
    Dr Clare Griffiths, Lecturer in Criminology, has a new publication in the British Journal of Criminology that is now available. In this article, Clare draws on some recent research that explores the idea of 'passive tolerance' to support the findings from her PhD on Polish immigration and its consequences for social order. A recent article in The Guardian reports on a study that shows living in diverse areas makes individuals more, not less, tolerant. The authors of the study suggest that simply observing diverse individuals interacting positively with each other has the potential to ‘rub…
  • Transforming Rehabilitation: and the parade passes on …

    11 Sep 2014 | 4:42 am
    by Dr Mary Corcoran, Senior Lecturer in Criminology“New forces appear on the scene, but they have been marshalled by old assumptions” (Marquand, 1997: 148).Two events coincided at the end of May, 2014, which illuminate contrary directions in thinking about the future of our social economy.  The first was the conference on Inclusive Capitalism, convened in London to ponder how markets could be rebalanced to be more inclusive and redistributive.  The second was the confirmation by the Ministry of Justice that the public Probation Service would be dissolved on June 1st.  It is…
  • Keele Sociology Students Most Satisfied in the Country

    8 Sep 2014 | 3:59 am
    The recent National Student Survey confirmed that Keele Sociology students have an excellent experience of the programme and are the most satisfied Sociology students in the country. The University itself ranked number 1 in the county for student satisfaction. In this respect the Sociology result is a reflection of the excellent work taking place across Keele. We are particularly proud that Keele Sociology has been ranked first for student satisfaction, putting our rating here higher than 92 other institutions. In Sociology we have focused on learning and teaching and…
  • New article - 'The great meeting place: Bradford's city park and inclusive urban space'

    21 Aug 2014 | 2:28 am
    Ala Sirriyeh (Keele Sociology) and her colleagues Nathan Manning (University of York) and Anna Barker (University of Bradford) have had an article published in the August edition of the online journal Discover Society. The article looks at the City Park development in Bradford and considers how this may be an example of a more inclusive model of urban regeneration. Ala has spoken to Bradford Community Radio about this project and her work was featured in a local newspaper.The full research report from the study (published in June 2014) is available to download here.
 
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    Sociological Stew

  • confessions of a former optimist

    6 Sep 2014 | 6:56 pm
    I have always been an optimist. Or perhaps I should say I was always an optimist until the last few years. This has little or nothing to do with my personal life experiences. I maintained an optimistic outlook during unemployment, poverty, cancer, divorce, and many other personal trials, and recent years have been kind to my husband and I in many ways. Moreover, my optimism  was not based on ignorance of the worlds problems and issues. My parents brought me up to be highly aware of the dire circumstance of poverty, war, brutality, pain and suffering that others in the world…
  • Why the Rich Hate Obama

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:23 am
    This morning I ran across an article "The Best Worst President Ever" by Mark Morford in SF Gate.  Morford observes a wealthy beneficiary of the economy under Obama proclaim Obama the "worst president ever." Morford then proceeds to give a litany of economic facts that provide ample evidence that this wealthy individual is almost certainly benefiting greatly from the economy during Obama's presidency. In the end Morford just laughs, and shakes his head at the "bizarre lament" of these crazy rich bastards. His only explanation is simple racism - rich white guys can't stand it that a black…
  • The Truths Hidden in Right Wing Survivalism

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    On a right wing web page, every other headline screams that Obama is responsible for impending disaster and doom to American society.  But hidden within the polarizing rhetoric is often startlingly accurate analysis of the real sources of the problems and the dangers facing America today: a capitalist economic system that enshrines greed and wanton wealth accumulation over economic and social stability and human needs. This short video is typical of the genre aimed at "patriots" and emphasizing individualism and family it provides a surprisingly fact based and astute analysis of…
  • Zombie America - Installment 5 UPDATED!

    6 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    America, the zombie nation that ONLY appears to be alive.  Excellent article about how economic reality on the ground of everyday life for most Americans contradicts the economic fantasies theory of economic and political elites who argue for more tax cuts for "job creators," also known as voodoo "trickle down" economics.See succinct article in Buzzflash  http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/trickle-down-economics-and-climate-deniers-face-an-insurmountable-challenge-realityThis is not debatable data: it is reality, like seeing rain gushing from the sky as proof that…
  • How Increases in Income Inequality Undermine Social Security

    28 Apr 2014 | 2:22 pm
    I spent several hours today working on a detailed example for my Inequality class, and thought that I would share it: Social Security retirement benefits are one of the most important things that prevents millions of elderly Americans from being poor.  Social security has been one of the most successful and most popular government programs in the past 80 years. As the baby boom generation ages and reaches retirement age (which began in 2011) and as the size of the younger generation of workers becomes smaller, people begin worrying about the solvency of the social security program.
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    scatterplot

  • performance management, threshold effects, and asa sections

    Dan Hirschman
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Every year, the end of September brings a peculiar class of emails from American Sociology Association section chairs and membership committees. ASA sections (e.g. “Economic Sociology,” “Sex and Gender,” etc.) organize much of the activity at the annual meetings. Each section is awarded a certain number of sessions based on the size of its membership on September 30th. If you have 399 members, you get 2 sessions; if you have 400 members, you get 3, and so on. As you would expect, sections routinely scramble in September to try to exceed the next threshold. The form of…
  • kurzman, missing martyrs

    andrewperrin
    29 Sep 2014 | 7:52 am
    I’m teaching my colleague Charlie Kurzman’s book The Missing Martyrs for the second time this semester in my Sociology 101 course. It’s a great book, and the students appreciate both its counterintuitive (to them) claims and its accessibility. (It doesn’t hurt that the book opens with a recounting of the all-but-forgotten botched attack on UNC’s campus in 2006.) One of the virtues of the book is the question it adopts: “why are there so few Muslim terrorists.” Kurzman notes that, among aggrieved populations that have spawned terrorist attacks, Muslims…
  • the revolution will not be invite-only

    jeremy
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:43 am
    Still, an Ello invitation would be nice. UPDATE: Thanks to Tina Fetner, I’m now on Ello, as jeremyfreese.  Friend me or whatever the appropriate verb for that service is.
  • overheard

    jeremy
    27 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    “Few things portend a protracted mess as powerfully as an insane person with a totally legitimate grievance about which little can actually be done.”
  • his honor wants more truck drivers

    andrewperrin
    26 Sep 2014 | 8:32 am
    Our governor, bless his heart, has come out with his latest education-is-overrated statement: “We’ve frankly got enough psychologists and sociologists and political science majors and journalists. With all due respect to journalism, we’ve got enough. We have way too many,” McCrory said to laughter from the audience. He said we have too many lawyers too, adding that some mechanics are making more than lawyers. “And journalists, did I say journalists?” he said for emphasis. My favorite neocon friend/mentor/correspondent wrote me to ask: What say you to your…
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    orgtheory.net

  • if granovetter wins the nobel, remember that orgtheory called it back in 2007

    fabiorojas
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Thomson Reuters has released a press announcement about their predictions for the 2014 Nobel prizes. They project it based on citation patterns. Check out the section on economics: Mark S. Granovetter Joan Butler Ford Professor and Chair of Sociology, and Joan Butler Ford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University Stanford, CA USA For his pioneering research in economic sociology Kewl!!! Even if Granovetter never wins, he’ll always be recognized as a leader in sociological approaches to markets. And remember, if he does win – WE CALLED IT IN 2007. And…
  • this is not a post about ello

    epopp
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:21 am
    This is not a post about Ello. Because Ello is so last Friday. But the rapid rise of and backlash against upstart social media network Ello (if you haven’t been paying attention, see here, here, here) reminded me of something I was wondering a while back. Lots of people are dissatisfied with Facebook — ad-heavy, curated in a way the user has little control over, privacy-poor. And it looks like Twitter, which really needs bring in more revenue, is taking steps to move in the same direction: algorithmic display of tweets, with the ultimate goal of making users more valuable to…
  • the declining role of simulations in sociology

    fabiorojas
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Over the weekend, I got into an exchange with UMD management student Robert Vesco over the computer science/sociology syllabus I posted last week. The issue, I think, is that he was surprised that the course narrowly focused on topic modelling – extracting meaning from text. Robert thought that maybe there should be a different focus. He proposed an alternative – teaching computer science via simulations. Two reactions: First, topic modelling may seem esoteric to computer scientists but it lies at the heart of sociology. We have interviews, field notes, media – all kinds of…
  • hong kong protest – initial questions

    fabiorojas
    28 Sep 2014 | 8:32 pm
    From the Guardian. Right now, pro-democracy protesters are in conflict with police in Hong Kong. I am not a China expert, so my knowledge is limited. A few questions for readers who know more than I do: What lessons have the Chinese state and activists learned from previous rounds of pro-democracy protest? Is this “internally generated?” Or have activists received training and support from outside China? Was this triggered by specific events, or is this a response to the slow assertion of mainland power in Hong Kong? Use the comments! 50+ chapters of grad skool advice…
  • hats and bluegrass. and whiskey. yes, please.

    fabiorojas
    27 Sep 2014 | 5:01 pm
    Thile’s Punch Brothers Play “Rye Whiskey.” via guest DJ M&M. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz/From Black Power
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Football Violence - Position or Disposition

    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    September 27, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonWhen sports stories wind up in the headlines and network news, something’s usually very wrong. The news biz, whether print of TV, usually keeps athletes confined in the sports section.  So now we have the network anchors talking about Adrian Peterson leaving welts on the flesh of his son, age four, or showing us the video of Ray Rice coldcocking his fiancee in the elevator. Other NFL domestic violence stories, previously ignored (no superstar players, no video), are now mentioned since they fit the news theme. These incidents all suggest that…
  • That Isn’t Funny

    24 Sep 2014 | 9:36 am
    September 24, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonMost of the time, when people talk about humor – TV  sitcoms, movie romcoms, comedians, jokes, etc. – they’ll say things like, “That show is so funny,” or conversely, “That show is definitely not funny.”  They assume that the funniness resides completely in the joke or show or comedian and that they themselves are objective observers.  But as any comedian knows, the funniness depends on the interaction between the joke and the audience. If everyone in the room is laughing, it doesn’t make much sense for you to say that…
  • Bloggiversary (Now We Are Eight)

    20 Sep 2014 | 6:35 am
    September 20, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonThis blog began in September 2006, eight years and 1341 posts ago. As I’ve said before, around this season I hear the CarGuys-like voice in my head saying, “Well, you’ve wasted another perfectly good year blogging.” Anyway, here are a few from the past year that I’ve sort of liked. 1.    Separate Ways  Sociology falls out of love with Malcolm Gladwell.2.     It’s Not About Obamacare and the companion piece Fearing Democracy    Anti-Obamacare as symbolic politics,…
  • Corporations and Friends

    17 Sep 2014 | 7:58 am
    September 17, 2014Posted by Jay Livingston“Corporations are people, my friend.” If Mitt Romney winds up in the quotations books and URLs, this will be his contribution. I’m not sure what Romney meant – probably that corporations were staffed by people, and perhaps that they were owned by people. It’s possible that he was referring to Supreme Court decisions that gave corporations some of the same rights as people.  Whatever he meant, the statement still rings false because a corporation is so obviously not an individual person. Corporations have no social or emotional…
  • When Thiago Met Daleyza

    16 Sep 2014 | 1:39 pm
    September 16, 2014Posted by Jay LivingstonFashions in names are like fashions in clothes in at least one respect – they change more quickly for females than for males. When it comes to naming a boy, the same old styles will do, and very few seem out of date. But with girls, it’s easy to think of names like Ethel, Edna, Shirley, Doris – popular at one time, but today, nobody’s would give that name to their daughter.  But William, Richard, and Robert stick around generation after generation . . . at least until now.That gender difference seems to be changing.  Even as recently…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Scottish Independence

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    So, Scotland remains part of the United Kingdom. This morning on the bus (I should run a series called “Idle Data Analysis on the Bus”) I looked at how the high turnout compared to other Scottish elections. Data on turnout is easily available back to 1970. Here are two views of it. Voter turnout in Scotland in National elections and plebiscites since 1970. You can get a larger image or a PDF version of the figure if you want a closer look at it. As you can see, turnout for the Independence Referendum was both astonishingly high and way off-trend. In addition to the long-term…
  • Durkheim viva voce

    19 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    I just attended the American Sociological Association Meetings in San Francisco, and while there my friend Marion Fourcade told me about a remarkable little piece of sociological history. It’s an audio recording of Émile Durkheim delivering a talk. Emile Durkheim recorded in 1911 in Bologna. I had no idea such a thing existed. The recording is about two and a half minutes long. It’s a fragment of a piece titled Jugements de valeur et jugements de réalité, which you can read in French here. It was recorded in 1911 at a meeting in Bologna, which I think is one of only quite few…
  • An ASA Bingo Retrospective

    12 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    ASA Conference Bingo is on a permanent vacation pending its return around 2030 in a nostalgic comeback that warms the hearts of fans old and new. But as several people have asked me about it, here is a collection of the cards from years past. Not available in stores. 2008 Back in 2008, the groundbreaking first ASA Conference Bingo was so new and radical, it required instructions to play. Only 100 people saw this Bingo, but every one of them formed a benign gambling addiction. 2009 The difficult Second Bingo was presented with no such concessions but subtly higher production values. 2009 Bingo…
  • We're Hiring

    11 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    My department is looking to fill a tenure-track Assistant Professor line this Fall. Area of Specialization is Race/Ethnicity. If you have access to the ASA Job Bank, you can read the ad here. If you don’t have access to the ASA Job Bank, you can read the ad right here: Job ID: 10444 Date Position is Available: Fall 2015 Listing Active: 8/12/2014 to 10/11/2014 Title: Assistant Professor Department: Department of Sociology Company: Duke University Job Position/Rank: Academic Positions; Assistant Professor Special Program and Areas of Faculty Expertise: Racial and Ethnic Relations Region:…
  • The Persistence of the Old Regime

    5 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    This afternoon I ended up reading this Vox story about an effort to rank US Universities and Colleges carried out in 1911 by a man named Kendric Charles Babcock. On Twitter, Robert Kelchen remarks that the report was “squashed by Taft” (an unpleasant fate), and he links to the report itself, which is terrific. Babcock divided schools into four Classes, beginning with Class I: The better sort of school. And descending all the way to Class IV: One hardly dares look at the transcripts. Babcock’s discussion of his methods is admirably brief (the snippet above hints at the one…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Policing for Wealth

    talesfromthelou
    28 Sep 2014 | 7:43 am
    Policing for Wealth. Copyright, Truthout.org. Reprinted with permission Sunday, 28 September 2014  By Aaron Cantú Truthout | News Analysis   (Image: JR / TO; Adapted: Lost & Taken) At a recent breakfast forum hosted by Crain’s, the twice and current NYPD commissioner, Bill Bratton, touted his record of success fighting “disorder” in New York City and beyond to an audience of corporate representatives. The city’s murder rate was 2,245 when he first became commissioner in 1994, he said; this year, it may be around 300. Bratton says the reduction is due in…
  • The Bigot Might Just Be Staring Back

    Roger Wilco | humanisthuman
    28 Sep 2014 | 7:33 am
    Stephen Eric Bronner recently penned an article carried by The Daily Beast, Why Bigotry Persists. The piece holds much truth, and is a succinct account of America’s social and political state. The article’s closing line, and the title of this post, is much of my reason for sharing it here. I have long wondered how those so aptly described by Bronner would feel were they to be marginalized, discriminated against, and hated as they do others. Time will tell.
  • What People are Like

    halsmith
    28 Sep 2014 | 6:43 am
    I am taking a MOOC on Organizational  Analysis. Here is the intro: —- It is hard to imagine living in modern society without participating in or interacting with organizations. The ubiquity and variability of organizations means there is ample room for complexity and confusion in the organizational challenges we regularly face. Through this course, students will consider cases describing various organizational struggles: school systems and politicians attempting to implement education reforms; government administrators dealing with an international crisis; technology firms trying to…
  • Minimum Wage and the Smoke-Making Machine

    Dave Ashelman
    28 Sep 2014 | 6:14 am
    Sometimes where there is smoke, especially in data, there is just a smoke making machine. Sometimes however, there is a raging fire inside a building that no one dare open the door to. Case in point is Janet Yellen’s dire warnings about a housing bubble in the mid-2000s. There was a raging fire inside of that bubble, and then someone opened the door (most likely the Wall Street short sellers of Bear Sterns). No one listened to Yellen. And now there is a different world. Econometrics no longer measures anything useful. We’re nearing “full employment” while 10 million people don’t…
  • Nothing changed on Sept 18th

    girvind
    28 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Between the vote on September 18th 2014 and the announcement of results on September 19th 2014 many have written that Scottish independence took ‘a body blow’, that hope died, that ‘rebellious Scots’ were effectively, crushed. As a proud and enthusiastic proponent of YES I must admit to a devastating feeling of loss and yes…  betrayal on that black Friday. I simply could not comprehend that so many couldn’t see what I and others saw so clearly; that Scotland had been robbed blind for decades by the profit-takers in London and elsewhere and that the time…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Gender equality leads to more Olympic medals for men and women

    30 Sep 2014 | 9:11 pm
    Gender equality boosts a country's Olympic medal count for both women and men, shows a new study from the University of British Columbia. read more
  • Alcohol makes smiles more 'contagious,' but only for men

    30 Sep 2014 | 8:49 am
    Consuming an alcoholic beverage may make men more responsive to the smiles of others in their social group, according to new research in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that, for men, alcohol increases sensitivity to rewarding social behaviors like smiling, and may shed light on risk factors that contribute to problem drinking among men. read more
  • Hand size appears to stay constant, providing natural 'ruler'

    29 Sep 2014 | 10:12 am
    People tend to perceive their dominant hand as staying relatively the same size even when it's magnified, lending support to the idea that we use our hand as a constant perceptual "ruler" to measure the world around us. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. read more
  • Talk therapy -- not medication -- best for social anxiety disorder, large study finds

    27 Sep 2014 | 3:51 am
    While antidepressants are the most commonly used treatment for social anxiety disorder, new research suggests that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is more effective and, unlike medication, can have lasting effects long after treatment has stopped. read more
  • Indian scientists significantly more religious than UK scientists

    24 Sep 2014 | 10:56 pm
    Indian scientists are significantly more religious than United Kingdom scientists, according to the first cross-national study of religion and spirituality among scientists. read more
 
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    Well Written Documents

  • Blogs: The Coolest New Dating Tool

    Popular Articles Contributor
    23 Sep 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Blogs: The Coolest New Dating Tool by Sven Hylten-Cavallius It’s easy to discount blogs as simply tools for newshounds, people who like to gripe or sell things, or teenagers. But blogs and their siblings webcasts are actually a great way … Continue reading →
  • The Worst Mistakes Guys Make When Texting Ladies

    Charlene Rossell
    9 Sep 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Worst Mistakes Guys Make When Texting Ladies by Charlie Badderly It is so annoying when you meet a girl and think things are going great. A few texts later, and she’s disappeared and has fizzled out. Her loss right? … Continue reading →
  • Creative Writing For Kids, A Great Endeavour!

    Popular Articles Contributor
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Creative Writing For Kids, A Great Endeavour! by Rui Lim If you are one of the many parents who are seeking ways of helping your kids learn creative writing, and want them to enjoy writing, you are not alone! Writing … Continue reading →
  • A True Songwriter Pens Her Soul: How Adele has the Upper Hand

    Brianna Berry
    12 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Composition of a Songwriter Heartache is oftentimes the root of creativity, especially for a songwriter. Deep emotions provoke some of the most altruistic and open written lyrics that music has ever seen. It’s a given. From Michael Jackson to … Continue reading →
  • Motivational Writing: Michelle Obama Raps Up Child Obesity

    Hope Benefield
    5 Aug 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Healthy Motivation: “You’ve Got to Eat Right; You’ve Got to Work Hard” Michelle Obama is using motivational writing in a hip-hop album release to combat childhood obesity. The 19 track CD, “Songs for a Healthier America“, is part of the … Continue reading →
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    jonathanrex.com

  • Starting Over

    J Rex
    22 Sep 2014 | 7:08 pm
    As I begin work on my first official album I’ll be writing and recording teaser tracks like the one above to various mainstream rappers’ instrumentals every couple weeks. Some of them will be brief clips and others full songs to show how I would have flipped these beats had they been mine. Between these teaser [&hellip
  • The Art of Angelo Musco

    J Rex
    22 Sep 2014 | 7:03 pm
    Angelo Musco is a contemporary artist from Naples, Italy. Working with thousands of nude models he photographs them individually and in groups before creating surreal landscapes out of their bodies. In 1997 he moved to New York where he now resides and works. Visit his website to see more of his creations: www.angelomusco.com
  • Colin Kaepernick

    J Rex
    21 Sep 2014 | 6:58 pm
    Being from San Francisco I’m a die-hard fan of both the 49ers and Giants and while we are off to a rough start this season with a 1-2 record after game three I’m standing behind my belief that Colin Kaepernick is going to develop into the greatest QB in the game. In his first season [&hellip
  • Paige Bradley

    J Rex
    18 Aug 2014 | 4:09 am
    “Born in Carmel, California Paige Bradley knew she would be an artist by the age of nine. Immersed in nature and art, Bradley’s fascination with the human figure began early. She believed that through the figure an artist could speak a universal language that is timeless and essential. Paige Bradley started drawing from the nude [&hellip
  • Body Sculpting

    J Rex
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:29 pm
    By the time I finished college I was 6’3 and 215lbs of disgusting. While in school I was eating practically everything in sight and drinking soda all day long. After graduating and moving to South Florida I realized I couldn’t hide my blubber under several layers of clothes and still look decent in the muggy [&hellip
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