Sociology

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  • In ‘Misbehaving,’ an Economics Professor Isn’t Afraid to Attack His Own

    NYT > Sociology
    5 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Richard Thaler writes that the social sciences once disparaged by economists have been critical to the profession’s influence in business and public policy.
  • Torah Sociology and Redemptive Aspects of Ethiopian Jewish Aliyah - Arutz Sheva

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News
    18 May 2015 | 6:21 pm
    Torah Sociology and Redemptive Aspects of Ethiopian Jewish AliyahArutz ShevaThese failures are the cause of the anger and pain graphically expressed in recent demonstrations. Liberal, secular sociologists and much of the media, review thirty years of successes and failures and conclude that Israel is a racist state. A Torah and more »
  • A Super Sweet Quince Economy

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    18 May 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales Growing up in Chicago, there were parts of the city that we’d go to to buy certain products. If we needed shoes or clothing, we’d walk or take the bus over to Maxwell Street to shop at places like Chernin’s, Mike’s, or the open-air market. If we wanted pan dulce (a traditional Mexican sweet bread) we’d go to Eighteenth Street to check out one of the many panaderias located there.  If my parents were looking for a piece of jewelry as a present for someone, they’d head over to Jeweler’s Row in downtown Chicago on Wabash.   As I got older and…
  • Book Review Symposium: Zygmunt Bauman, What Use is Sociology? Conversations with Michael Hviid Jacobsen and Keith Tester

    SagePub: Sociology
    Wollman, H.
    18 May 2015 | 3:56 am
  • Solid data on "messages received" increasing over time?

    Metafilter: Sociology
    Shepherd
    4 May 2015 | 2:33 pm
    I'm working on something with the sloppy premise that over the gradual shift from print to digital, communications isn't a zero-sum game. The general idea is that the introduction of things like first the Internet and e-mail, and later social media and texting, have increased the total number of messages people receive, and that people are increasingly "messaged at" over time. What sources can help me prove this, or disprove it? It feels like a common-sensey assumption, but might just be "truthy" (or even just wrong). It seems like something that should be quantifiable, as one can count…
 
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • Torah Sociology and Redemptive Aspects of Ethiopian Jewish Aliyah - Arutz Sheva

    18 May 2015 | 6:21 pm
    Torah Sociology and Redemptive Aspects of Ethiopian Jewish AliyahArutz ShevaThese failures are the cause of the anger and pain graphically expressed in recent demonstrations. Liberal, secular sociologists and much of the media, review thirty years of successes and failures and conclude that Israel is a racist state. A Torah and more »
  • Sociology students stage demonstration - The Hindu

    16 May 2015 | 5:13 pm
    Sociology students stage demonstrationThe HinduThe students said they studied sociology for seven years. However, students of MSW and Anthropology come from varied backgrounds without necessarily having studied sociology at any level and they should not be considered to teach sociology at the PU ...SOCIOLOGY GRADUATES AND FACULTY THREATEN STATE-WIDE AGITATIONStar of Mysoreall 3 news articles »
  • This Is What Happens When a Black Sociology Prof Tweets About White College ... - Slate Magazine

    16 May 2015 | 11:02 am
    Slate MagazineThis Is What Happens When a Black Sociology Prof Tweets About White College Slate MagazineHer statement came hours after Robert A. Brown, president of Boston University, where Grundy becomes an assistant professor of sociology July 1, issued a statement that was highly critical of her comments on Twitter. Via email, Grundy responded to an ...What happens when scholars discuss potentially controversial ideas outside the Inside Higher EdBoston Univ. professor under fire for tweets on raceHLNtv.comBlack Boston University professor apologizes for calling White college males New…
  • Sociology class learns farming of the future at Auburn High School in Rockford - Rockford Register Star

    14 May 2015 | 8:43 pm
    Sociology class learns farming of the future at Auburn High School in RockfordRockford Register StarA typical sociology class reads from a textbook, defines terms and takes written exams; Bratina's more hands-on approach has made a direct impact on the community when students donate much of the crop to Rockford's food banks. "This time next year (we) ...and more »
  • Gus Malzahn 'very proud' Cam Newton returned to Auburn for sociology degree - AL.com

    13 May 2015 | 4:20 pm
    AL.comGus Malzahn 'very proud' Cam Newton returned to Auburn for sociology degreeAL.comThe Carolina Panthers quarterback returned to the Plains for three straight spring semesters working on his degree in sociology, which he earned last Saturday. "I'm very proud of Cam," Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn told AL.com Wednesday after ...and more »
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • A Super Sweet Quince Economy

    W. W. Norton
    18 May 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales Growing up in Chicago, there were parts of the city that we’d go to to buy certain products. If we needed shoes or clothing, we’d walk or take the bus over to Maxwell Street to shop at places like Chernin’s, Mike’s, or the open-air market. If we wanted pan dulce (a traditional Mexican sweet bread) we’d go to Eighteenth Street to check out one of the many panaderias located there.  If my parents were looking for a piece of jewelry as a present for someone, they’d head over to Jeweler’s Row in downtown Chicago on Wabash.   As I got older and…
  • Probability vs. Certainty

    W. W. Norton
    14 May 2015 | 10:06 am
    By Karen Sternheimer In a recent class discussion, we talked about the connection between children who have parents who are incarcerated and the likelihood of future incarceration for those children. One student had trouble understanding how all kids in this situation don’t end up in prison someday. After all, don’t we all just follow our parents’ examples? Children with parents in prison do have a greater likelihood of getting arrested in the future, for a number of reasons beyond the scope of this post. The real issue that this student needed to understand was the concept of…
  • Surrogacy: An International Birth Market

    W. W. Norton
    8 May 2015 | 6:08 pm
    By Sally Raskoff News about the terrible earthquake in Nepal drew attention to the practice of Israeli citizens using Indian surrogates who give birth to their babies in Nepal. The newborns have been sent home with their Israeli parents, yet these surrogates, along with other pregnant surrogates, were left behind. Many of the news articles mention that 26 newborn babies just went home, some with their new parents, while the remaining 100 pregnant surrogates – and those 26 women who had recently given birth – are left in Nepal. Israel’s Interior Minister has evidently just approved…
  • How Can Sociology Help Explain the Civil Unrest in Baltimore?

    W. W. Norton
    5 May 2015 | 5:34 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer On our last day of class for the spring semester, I asked my classes this question, in order to apply what they learned during the semester to help understand the civil unrest in Baltimore in late April. The events were triggered by the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody on April 12, leading many citizens to public protests. After his funeral on April 27, demonstrations took place, and not all of remained peaceful. The news filled with vivid imagery of clashes with police, destruction of property, fire, and looting. In a video that went viral, a mother shown…
  • Extreme Inequality: Workers vs.CEOs

    W. W. Norton
    28 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Peter Kaufman   Imagine you work full-time as a customer service representative at a call center for one of the giant telecommunication companies. Your job is to help customers deal with a whole array of problems they may have with their wireless devices from poor reception to billing miscalculations to hardware malfunctions. At times, you must talk with irate and agitated callers but you must deal with these customers quickly and expediently or else your job performance will suffer and you may miss out on the potential for year-end bonuses.  You have been working for…
 
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Solid data on "messages received" increasing over time?

    Shepherd
    4 May 2015 | 2:33 pm
    I'm working on something with the sloppy premise that over the gradual shift from print to digital, communications isn't a zero-sum game. The general idea is that the introduction of things like first the Internet and e-mail, and later social media and texting, have increased the total number of messages people receive, and that people are increasingly "messaged at" over time. What sources can help me prove this, or disprove it? It feels like a common-sensey assumption, but might just be "truthy" (or even just wrong). It seems like something that should be quantifiable, as one can count…
  • Examples of norms that prohibit costly behavior and emerge informally?

    mrmanvir
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:43 am
    hivemind!!!! Does anyone know of any cases where a norm informally or organically arises that prohibits a behavior that is costly to others (i.e., has negative externalities) or demands that individuals do something to reduce costs for others? Examples that come to mind are norms against smoking and norms demanding that people cover their mouths when they sneeze. It would be especially great if anyone also knew of some literature about the emergence of the norm, especially in the form of academic articles, though stuff from newspapers, magazines, etc. would be rad too. Thanks!
  • Examples of under-enforced rules, laws, taboos, norms?

    mrmanvir
    4 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
    Hivemind! Does anyone know any examples of rules, regulations, laws, or norms that are under-enforced (e.g., violations go unpunished), leading the rule to completely destabilize (i.e., no one follows it)? I'm sure that there are A LOT of examples of this - stuff from any and all disciplines and scales would be welcome. I'm preferentially searching for unconventional examples (e.g., rules of children's games, supernaturally-sanctioned laws of hunter-gatherer bands) and I'm also looking especially for primary literature (e.g., experiments, case studies, etc.), but ultimately anything would be…
  • Are we more or less honest than a hundred years ago?

    mecran01
    12 Mar 2015 | 12:49 am
    Are the citizens of the U.S. more or less honest than a hundred years ago? Is there any longitudinal research that explores this question? I'm always hearing people decry the corruption and dishonesty of people in general, but from what I can tell, we have always been ripping each other off. Is there any solid research, like a workplace integrity test or something, that has been consistently administered over the last 50-100 years that could answer this question meaningfully?
  • Primers on Bourdieu

    codacorolla
    9 Mar 2015 | 1:13 pm
    I'm interested in becoming more familiar with Bourdieu's ideas of habitas, fields, and forms of capital. I'd like to start with a primer book, or perhaps a collection of essays, that go over his ideas. Can you recommend one that covers these main ideas, frames them in terms of contemporary theorists, and is fairly accessible?
 
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    Keele University: Sociology Staff

  • Sociology Workshop for Keele Refugee Week

    21 May 2015 | 12:59 am
    Keele Refugee Week8th-14th June 2015Social Networks and BelongingSociology WorkshopWednesday, 10th June 20152.00 – 5.30pmChancellor’s Building: CBA1.078/9‘Refugee Week is a UK-wide programme of arts, cultural and education events and activities that celebrates the contribution of refugees to the UK and promotes better understanding of why people seek sanctuary’ (Refugee Week nd). It involves thousands of people, institutions, organizations, and individuals throughout the country. Last year Keele joined Refugee Week for the first time by hosting a weeklong photographic…
  • Walking studies seminar - registration open

    7 May 2015 | 3:27 am
    Here are some more details about our forthcoming workshop:'Walking' Studies Today*Network Seminar and TasterClaus Moser Building CM0.012Tuesday May 26, 20159.45 – 16.30 The last 10 years or so have seen a growing interest in walking in urban and cultural geography (Middleton 2009, 2010, 2011), literary and cultural studies (Solnit 2000; Macfarlane 2013), oral history (High 2013) and visual and performing arts (Mock 2009, Smith 2014, 2015). Some of the canonical theories on walking - ubiquitous in urban studies - tend to represent this as a liberating and/or subversive act (Debord 1959,…
  • Forthcoming workshop on Walking

    1 May 2015 | 4:55 am
    Dr Andy Zieleniec (Sociology) and Dr Ceri Morgan (Humanities) have been awarded through the Research Strategy Fund for a multidisciplinary networking workshop on 'Walking' to be held on the 26th May 2015 in the Claus Moser Building.This networking project builds on previous and current research on imaginary and material geographies of the urban, rural and suburban (Zieleniec 2007; Morgan 2012), public parks (Zieleniec 2013), and geopoetics (Morgan 2008). It seeks to bring together a number of academics and practitioners from diverse backgrounds to discuss current trends and future…
  • Keele students visit Pendleton Correctional Facility

    24 Apr 2015 | 6:51 am
    By Dr Guy Woolnough, Criminology Teaching Fellow  In April 2015, twelve Criminology students, accompanied by Dr Guy Woolnough, visited Ball State University, Indiana. The visit was hosted by Professor Mike Brown of the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Ball State University.  Pendleton Correctional Facility, Indiana (1)This is cross-posted from www.guywoolnough.comWe would like to thank the staff and inmates of Pendleton Correctional Facility for their generous welcome, for their interest and consideration, and for helping us to understand the…
  • 'Have you attacked a Somali yet?' Terrorism and bigotry on the web

    20 Apr 2015 | 7:49 am
    By Mwenda Kailemia, Lecturer in Criminology  In this post Mwenda Kailemia reflects on the views of Ayaan Hirsi on the terrorist attacks in Kenya. Mwenda recently wrote a piece for The Guardian on these attacks.  When she used to be a Somali heroine - before she became a republican gadfly - Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s biography embodied the collective hope and pain of the Somali nation. We read in her Nomad not only the challenges of democratic institutional building (for example, in her familial travails in conservative Saudi Arabia or in her father’s experiences in Siad…
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    scatterplot

  • lacour and the opportunity costs of intransigent irb reviews

    mike3550
    21 May 2015 | 9:36 am
    Of all of the issues brought up by the Lacour controversy, we have not devoted enough attention to one in my view. The YaleColumbia* IRB made itself part of this problem. In his initial comments to Retraction Watch, Lacour’s coauthor and Columbia political science professor Donal Green wrote, Given that I did not have IRB approval for the study from my home institution, I took care not to analyze any primary data – the datafiles that I analyzed were the same replication datasets that Michael LaCour posted to his website. Looking back, the failure to verify the original Qualtrics…
  • the lacour and green retraction

    andrewperrin
    20 May 2015 | 8:11 am
    News broke recently of very serious concerns about the data in a high-profile political science study. Not to put too fine of a point on it, it now appears that a UCLA graduate student and rising star in political science, Michael LaCour, fabricated data nearly out of whole cloth. These data led to a surprising, widely-cited finding about the ability of relatively minor sympathetic contact to change attitudes toward LGBT people over the medium term. The original article is here, a very careful forensic investigation that revealed the likely fabrication is here, and Retraction Watch has a…
  • 2015 junior theorists symposium (jts) schedule

    jessica
    15 May 2015 | 4:33 am
    As a follow-up to Dan’s posting of the Junior Theorists Symposium’s call for papers last year, here is the recently released schedule. By the looks of it, 2015’s event promises to live up to the JTS’s reputation as a lively and thought-provoking way to kick off the ASA meetings. The event is open to all.* Junior Theorists Symposium University of Chicago Social Sciences Room 122 August 21, 2015 8:30 – 9:00 | Coffee and Bagels 9:00 – 10:50 | Race and Gender Clayton Childress (University of Toronto) – “Cultures of Inequality: The “Double Match” of Race and…
  • black/white mortality differentials and american politics

    Dan Hirschman
    11 May 2015 | 12:26 pm
    There’s a new paper from Social Science and Medicine making the rounds with the provocative title “Black lives matter: Differential mortality and the racial composition of the U.S. electorate, 1970–2004.” The Monkey Cage has a write-up with a blunt (clickbait-y?) title that emphasizes the paper’s main question, Blacks die sooner than whites. How many votes has this cost Democrats? Something about this framing bothered me. In the paper, Rodriguez et al* first document the persistent black/white mortality differential in the United States. One of the more depressing…
  • facebook’s algorithm removes politically diverse content from your feed

    Dan Hirschman
    7 May 2015 | 1:22 pm
    Today, three researchers at Facebook released a new study in Science titled “Exposure to ideologically diverse news and opinion on Facebook.” The authors summarize their own findings in a companion blog post: We found that people have friends who claim an opposing political ideology, and that the content in peoples’ News Feeds reflect those diverse views. While News Feed surfaces content that is slightly more aligned with an individual’s own ideology (based on that person’s actions on Facebook), who they friend and what content they click on are more…
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    orgtheory.net

  • internet shaming and african american studies

    fabiorojas
    21 May 2015 | 5:01 pm
    This post is a commentary on the controversy around Saida Grundy’s tweets. Recently, Grundy, posted tweets about the legacy of racism. The gist of Grundy’s tweets was that there is a legacy of racism and privilege that is not addressed in American society. At the AAUP blog, Arianne Shavisi summarizes the tweets well: “Grundy … an incoming sociology faculty member at Boston University, tweeted a set of remarks and rhetorical questions regarding white supremacy, slavery, and misogyny in the US.” The tweets generated controversy because they were written in an…
  • open borders: it might be your issue

    fabiorojas
    20 May 2015 | 5:01 pm
    In this post, I’d like to explain why you might want to adopt open borders as one of your issues. First, open borders is an issue that affects all people. Any one of us might want to travel to another country for work or enjoyment. For millions of people, migration represents the only plausible avenue out of poverty. Second, open borders is a “common grounds” issue. It is a policy position that is consistent with most political ideologies. Liberals should favor free migration because it is the easiest way to address poverty and global inequality. Conservatives should support…
  • junior theorists symposium 2015

    fabiorojas
    19 May 2015 | 5:01 pm
    As usual, the Junior Theorists Symposium has an amazing line up. Day before the ASA. Check it out! Junior Theorists Symposium University of Chicago Social Sciences Room 122 August 21, 2015 8:30 – 9:00 | Coffee and Bagels 9:00 – 10:50 | Race and Gender * Clayton Childress (University of Toronto) – “Cultures of Inequality: The “Double Match” of Race and Meaning” * Jason Orne (University of Wisconsin – Madison) – “A Theory of Sexual Racism” * Sarah Mayorga-Gallo (University of Cincinnati) – “Diversity as Ideology in Multiethnic Spaces” Discussant: Patricia Hill…
  • organizations and the politics of “good” work

    carolinewlee
    19 May 2015 | 10:45 am
    Fellow guest blogger Ellen Berrey asked in a previous post how “powerful, elite organizations” can “lessen inequality” or “advance broad progressive causes like social justice.” As someone who has studied the progressive consultants who produce public engagement processes on behalf of corporations, governments, and non-profits, I’m excited to take up her challenge to go beyond cataloging wrongdoing and “foreground power and meaning making.” I think one reason people have trouble understanding the good work organizations do is because it’s complicated. We bring in lots of…
  • the push for diversity

    ellenberrey
    19 May 2015 | 8:11 am
    My new book, The Enigma of Diversity: The Language of Race and the Limits of Racial Justice (University of Chicago Press)is officially out today. Yay! The book is about diversity—that word, diversity—the organizational politics that coalesce around it, and the implications for the struggle for racial justice. I’m going to paste some excerpts here that highlight the main (empirical) argument. I’m working on a variation of this for an op-ed. Reactions welcome! Talk of “diversity” is ubiquitious in the twenty-first-century United States, from the Oval Office to celebratory…
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Privilege (Twice!), Class, and Collectivism

    22 May 2015 | 1:28 pm
    May 22, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonPrivilege* is the title of Shamus Khan’s 2011 study of St. Paul’s, an elite New England prep school where he had been a student. The difference between the new elite and the old is the difference between “entitlement” and “privilege.” Whereas elites of the past were entitled – building their worlds around the “right” breeding, connection, and culture – new elites develop privilege: a sense of self and a mode of interaction that advantage them. The old entitled elites constituted a class that worked to construct moats and walls around the…
  • No, No, a Thousand Times No

    21 May 2015 | 6:38 am
    May 21, 2015 Posted by Jay LivingstonThe Financial Times wants me to tweet this quote from Martin Wolf, “widely considered to be one of the world's most influential writers on economics” (Wikipedia).    I admit, there is tweet temptation. But not for the reason the FT thinks.  No, what strikes me in this quote is the multiple negatives. They leave me utterly confused as to what the passage means. Here’s a simplified version.It is impossible to believe that the government cannot find investments . . . that do not earn more than the real cost of funds. If that…
  • Don Draper Meets the Chicago School

    20 May 2015 | 7:25 am
    May 20, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonIn the next-to-last episode of “Mad Men,” Don Draper has walked out of an important meeting at work and driven to Wisconsin searching for a waitress he had a brief affair with. Not finding her, he now continues to Kansas and Oklahoma. He is on the road.  The reference point though is not Kerouac but a much earlier book. The title of the episode is “The Milk and Honey Route.” Nels Anderson was a “Chicago school” sociologist, a student of Park and Burgess in the 1920s. That school produced what we would now call urban ethnographies – Harvey…
  • Do Liberals Fail the Churches?

    18 May 2015 | 7:12 am
    May 18, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonRoss Douthat calls out liberals who think, and declare, that churches today are more focused on “culture war” issues like abortion and homosexuality than on poverty.        Ridiculous, says Douthat.  Religious organizations spend only “a few hundred million dollars” on pro-life causes and “traditional marriage” but tens of billions on charities, schools, and hospitals.  (His column “Do Churches Fail the Poor?” is here.)Those numbers shouldn’t be surprising, especially since much of religion’s…
  • The Grave’s a Fine and Private Place, But None There Vote in a Senate Race

    16 May 2015 | 5:06 am
    May 16, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonBlack people in the US vote overwhelmingly Democratic. They also have, compared to Whites, much higher rates of infant mortality and lower life expectancy. Since dead people have lower rates of voting, that higher mortality rate might affect who gets elected. What would happen if Blacks and Whites had equal rates of staying alive?The above figure is from the recent paper, “Black lives matter: Differential mortality and the racial composition of the U.S. electorate, 1970-2004,” by Javier Rodriguez, Arline Geronimus, John Bound and Danny Dorling …
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Fake Science, Real Consequences

    20 May 2015 | 7:20 am
    This morning, Social Science Twitter is consumed by the discovery of fraud in a very widely-circulated political science paper published last year in Science magazine. “When contact changes minds: An experiment on transmission of support for gay equality”, by Michael LaCour and Donald Green, reported very strong and persistent changes in people’s opinion about same-sex marriage when voters were canvassed by a gay person. The paper appeared to have a strong experimental design and, importantly, really good follow-up data. Can a single conversation change minds on divisive…
  • ATP Shownote Data

    15 May 2015 | 11:18 am
    The hosts at Accidental Tech Podcast have been thinking about how to broaden their base of listeners to include more women. Good for them. They’re getting plenty of advice (and a certain amount of flak), which I won’t add to. But in general when doing this kind of thing it can be helpful to look back on what your past practice has been. For example, it can be useful to audit one’s own habits of linking and engagement. Often exclusion is less a matter of explicit boundary policing (though God knows there’s enough of that in the tech sector) and more a matter of passive…
  • UK Election Miscellany

    14 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    This UK Election data is really too much fun to play around with. Here’s a (probably final) collection of pictures. First, a map of the turnout (that is, the percentage of the electorate who actually voted) by constituency, with London highlighted for a bit more detail. Constituencies by Turnout. There’s a strong suggestion here that Labour areas have lower turnout. Here’s a scatterplot of all seats showing the winning candidate’s share of the electorate plotted against turnout. Winner's share of Electorate v Turnout. You can see here that Scotland turned out to…
  • Politics and the English Landscape

    9 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    I’m still playing around with the UK Election data I mapped yesterday, which ended up at the Monkey Cage blog over at the Washington Post. On Twitter, Vaughn Roderick posted this nice comparison showing the proximity of many Labour seats to coalfields. Do I get a prize for this? Distribution of Labour seats compared to England and Wales coalfields. pic.twitter.com/9xeQERU9mR— Vaughan Roderick (@VaughanRoderick) May 9, 2015 That got me thinking about how much the landscape of England is embedded in its political life. In particular, what do the names of places tell you about their…
  • Who Came Second in the UK Election?

    8 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    The United Kingdom’s election results are being digested by the chattering classes. So, yesterday afternoon I thought I’d see if I could grab the election data to make some pictures. Because the ever-civilized BBC has election web pages with a sane HTML structure, this proved a lot more straightforward than I feared. (Thanks also in no small part to statistician Hadley Wickham’s rvest scraping library, alongside many other tools he has contributed to the community of social scientists who use R to do data analysis.) Here are two maps. The first is a version of the one…
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    chris uggen's weblog

  • Research on a Potato Chip Budget

    7 May 2015 | 2:17 pm
    Last week, our former university president Mark Yudof quipped that "Americans spend more on potato chips than research - maybe they like the flavor better." We haven't checked Mr. Yudof's math, but his points are well-taken. First, research budgets have been lean, particularly in the social sciences. Second, our research sometimes unearths truths that our leaders and citizens may find distasteful, particularly in the social sciences.The Society Pages is built on the belief that social scientific information, analysis, and perspective is vital and necessary for policy…
  • Public Criminology and the Social Media Echo Chamber

    23 Jan 2015 | 11:07 am
    When the news came from Ferguson on November 24th, it was hard to know what to do. Every sociologist and criminologist possesses some pertinent expertise, whether we study violence, law, race, or criminal justice and injustice. But how and when should we engage? The streets were alive with protesters, police officers, and journalists. The President was calling for calm, which was itself a polarizing message. And Facebook feeds flowed with horrifying videos, rage, and invective, as many were “defriending” and “unfollowing” one another until their social networks were fully…
  • Methods are Beautiful

    4 Jan 2015 | 1:28 pm
    Many TSP readers are more interested in research findings than the methodologies used to obtain them. But methods are often an important part of the story, such as new experimental studies that provide powerful tools for measuring discrimination. Backstage at TheSocietyPages.org, we're constantly arguing about whether a study's methods are strong enough to support its findings. And methods are so important that we won't run a piece unless we agree the underlying research is methodologically sound -- regardless of who produced it or where it…
  • Why Sex Offenders are Running for Office

    17 Oct 2014 | 11:40 am
    Locked Out (creative commons image by Jared Rodriguez)The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports that a group of "sex offenders" are registering to vote and plan to run for elected office. I put "sex offenders" in quotations because these voters and office-seekers are not currently under supervision for any crime. Instead, they are "civilly committed," which means that they have either already completed their criminal sentences or, as is the case for over 50 clients, they were never charged as an adult for a sex offense. Although they are euphemistically called "clients" rather than…
  • Which Prisoners Get Visitors?

    5 Aug 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better -- both while they're incarcerated and after they're released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation. The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure below shows, prisoners who are younger, white or…
 
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    Work, Employment & Society current issue

  • Book review: Jennifer M Silva, Coming up Short: Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty

    Cole, M.
    19 May 2015 | 7:29 am
  • Why migrants earn less: in search of the factors producing the ethno-migrant pay gap in a Dutch public organization

    Siebers, H., van Gastel, J.
    19 May 2015 | 7:29 am
    In many countries, migrant/ethnic minority workers earn less than non-migrant/ethnic majority employees. This pay gap is not only attributable to migrant/ethnic minority employees having acquired less human capital or social capital, to the impact of government policies and to discrimination. Based on both qualitative and quantitative data collected in 2010, this case study of the job segregation component of the wage disadvantages of migrant employees in a Dutch public organization identifies several other factors. Migrant workers’/ethnic minority employees’ lower levels of…
  • Book review: John H Pencavel (ed.), The Economics of Worker Cooperatives

    Cheney, G.
    19 May 2015 | 7:29 am
  • Migrant workers and the north of Ireland: between neo-liberalism and sectarianism

    Garvey, B., Stewart, P.
    19 May 2015 | 7:29 am
    In 1998, the north of Ireland emerged from a protracted civil insurgency sustained by a socio-political infrastructure comprising an expanded Keynesian welfare state and a developing neo-liberal economy. This provided the context for significant migration to the North after 2004. While research highlights migrant experiences not dissimilar to those in other parts of the UK and Ireland after 2004 it also suggests that a number of reported experiences result from the reproduction of one aspect of a new sectarian dispensation. Traditional sectarianism, while typically sustaining differential…
  • Pills, ills and the ugly face of aesthetic labour: 'They should've discriminated against me'

    Butler, C., Harris, J.
    19 May 2015 | 7:29 am
    This article presents a vivid account of one woman’s experience of taking on a second job – the role of a slimming club consultant – when her husband is made unemployed. Her story highlights how aesthetic labour, particularly when a worker’s appearance becomes more prominent over time, can lead to dangerous behaviours, namely the use of weight-loss pills and illegal drugs. These behaviours resulted in sleeplessness, frequent headaches and a feeling of disgust. Furthermore, this troubling account raises an important and uncomfortable question: can discrimination in the…
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • "Subscribe!! Lk 4 Lk? Follow 4 Follow?" Oh Sod Off.

    wynonainaname
    19 May 2015 | 12:18 pm
    I have not long returned from a holiday abroad (which I won’t be using as an excuse for not posting as we both know that I’m just generally unreliable) with my sister and I found the experience to be somewhat… enlightening. This ‘enlightenment‘ was unfortunately not in a spiritual way. I did by the end of it though feel like I was in need of some guidance and severely lacking in inner peace. It is enlightening in terms of her behaviour on the holiday, and how it continued to (and I don’t doubt will continue to do so) baffle me. I have decided to refer to it…
  • The Matching Game

    prishitaeloise
    19 May 2015 | 12:16 pm
    Vaccinations and antibiotics. Artificial lighting. Winter woollens. Since the dawn of anatomically modern humans around 200,000 years ago, we have striven to develop every substance that would allow us to evade natural selection and have complete control over our present and our future. Therefore, it would be surprising to realise that despite this, we have continued to follow certain evolutionary behaviours; ones that improve the chances of our genes being passed on, would it not? Yet, recently, there is one behaviour in particular that I keep noticing in couples; they are nearly always of a…
  • Taylor Swift's "Bad Blood": A Feminist Marvel

    smratcl2
    19 May 2015 | 10:52 am
    As you turn on the Billboard Music Awards, one of the first videos you come across is one that has had a lot of media attention over the past couple of weeks. Taylor Swift has truly taken to her role of an empowered female, and done an amazing job incorporating with all of these other powerful females and feminist activists. She defied many stereotypes that come with being a woman, and did it in a mind-blowing and effective way. Let’s look at the way that the women are dressed, and the choice of clothing across the board. Taylor and her team incorporated a large array of outfits, from…
  • India's shocking farmer suicide epidemic is not going away

    talesfromtheconspiratum
    19 May 2015 | 10:40 am
    India’s shocking farmer suicide epidemic – Al Jazeera English. In the last 20 years, nea
  • Thom: The Future of Labor (Human or Not)

    Educated and Unemployed
    19 May 2015 | 10:28 am
    In parts of California we’ll soon see less than certain socio-economic upheavals. Not revolutions per se – because that would thrust too much accountability upon the Silicon Valley technologists that are creating economic unrest for the middle and lower classes – but definite tensions and demonstrations by a working class that feels, in the neo-luddite fashion, that they are being replaced by technology. This has easily been a discussion since the dawn of manufacturing, and was illustrated in the image of a cobbler by Adolf Loos in his famous essay “Ornament and Crime.”[1] Indeed,…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Study: 44 percent of parents struggle to limit cell phone use at playgrounds

    19 May 2015 | 5:33 am
    A new University of Washington study finds that cell phone use at playgrounds is a significant source of parental guilt, as well as a powerful distraction when children try to get caregivers' attention or ask to them to watch a monkey bar trick for the hundredth time. read more
  • NYU researchers ID part of the brain for processing speech

    18 May 2015 | 3:53 pm
    A team of New York University neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech. Its findings point to the superior temporal sulcus (STS), located in the temporal lobe, and help settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions. read more
  • New insights into the male bias of autism

    13 May 2015 | 7:37 am
    Male toddlers with autism have significant structural differences in their brains compared to females with the condition, according to research published in the open access journal Molecular Autism. read more
  • College readiness declines when school's focus is improving test scores, study finds

    12 May 2015 | 2:31 pm
    Education reform policies that penalize struggling schools for poor standardized test scores may hinder -- not improve -- students' college readiness, if a school's instructional focus becomes improving its test scores, suggests a new study that explored efforts to promote a college-going culture at one Texas high school. read more
  • Bragging: Researchers find self-promotion often backfires

    12 May 2015 | 11:34 am
    Bragging to coworkers about a recent promotion, or posting a photo of your brand new car on Facebook, may seem like harmless ways to share good news. read more
 
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    Jonathan Rex

  • Pure Jatomi Fitness

    jrex365
    19 May 2015 | 2:57 pm
    This evening I rode my bike along the river and stopped by Galeria Kazimierz to check out the nearest Jatomi Fitness. I have to be completely honest, the place creeped me the fuck out. If Aldous Huxley had imagined a fitness center in his story Brave New World it would be Jatomi Fitness. What is even more disturbing than the environment is the rapid rate of success that this gym has had since it was established in Warsaw back in 2007 by Mike Balfour and James Balfour. Having come from the United States I never heard of Jatomi Fitness (in the U.S. it is L.A. Fitness that’s disgustingly…
  • Welcome To Krakow

    jrex365
    17 May 2015 | 11:11 am
    On May 1st I moved from Delray Beach in Florida to Krakow, Poland. Fell in love with this city. If you’ve never been here definitely put it on your bucket list of places to see during your life. Just avoid girls with umbrellas who invite you into Strip Clubs and you won’t regret your trip here. Or, if you do go along with them make sure to pay with cash and you won’t return home to discover an enormous bill.
  • Chaim Machlev

    jrex365
    7 May 2015 | 4:29 am
    Chaim Machlev is a tattoo artist based in Berlin who works by individual appointments only.  I came across his tattoos a while back when I was living in the United States. Now that I’m living in Europe it’s definitely on my to-do list to meet up with him to do my first tattoo.
  • Ray Lamontagne

    jrex365
    3 Apr 2015 | 5:38 pm
    I stumbled across Ray’s music back in 2007 while in college when I saw this show on BBC and have been a fan ever since. If you’ve never heard of him you’re missing out. Do yourself a a favor, save the link to this post and when you have an hour free come back and hit play on the video below. Intro Three More Days Shelter Hold You In My Arms Be Here Now Empty Barfly Gone Away From Me Trouble Till The Sun Turns Black You Can Bring Me Flowers Jolene Can I Stay End    
  • Le Palais Idéal

    jrex365
    29 Mar 2015 | 6:41 pm
    Ferdinand Cheval was a French  postman who dedicated 33 years of his life toward building a castle out of stones that he collected and molded together with lime, mortar and cement. One day while delivering mail he tripped over a rock and recalled a dream that he had years earlier of himself building a palace with caves. Picking the rock up he put it in his pocket and set out to bring his dream to life. The end result was  Le Palais Idéal (The Ideal Palace) in Hauterives, France. He originally wanted to be buried inside his palace but that was illegal according to French law so he…
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