Sociology

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  • Globalization: Is the World Getting Smaller or Larger?

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    18 Feb 2015 | 2:47 pm
    By Peter Kaufman When I first started teaching, there was one phrase I told myself I would never use in class: “When I was your age . . .” As I am now undeniably in the category of “middle age,” and having been teaching in college classrooms for nearly 20 years, I must come clean and admit that I find myself using that phrase more often than I’d like. My only defense, and I realize it’s somewhat lame, is that things are changing so quickly. Life really was very different when I was in college and sometimes I just can’t help but marvel at these changes aloud. The transformations…
  • Middle-Aged Men and Alcohol

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:19 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer We’ve all probably heard the phrase “teen drinking” and thought about it as a social problem. Many public service announcements (PSAs), like the one below, highlight the problem of teen drinking. But data just released from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that 35-64-year-olds are the most likely of any age group to die from drinking too much. And three-quarters of those who die are men. Perhaps we should have PSAs for teens’ fathers and grandfathers. More people 65 and older died of alcohol poisoning than those aged 15-24.  …
  • Sociology on the Red Carpet

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    13 Feb 2015 | 2:47 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer In the entertainment industry, the first two months of the year are unofficially known as awards season. There are more awards shows than most of us know about, culminating with the Academy Awards at the end of February. While it may seem that awards shows are trivial or just entertainment, we can learn several sociological lessons from these events. Both awards shows and pre-show red carpet walks are  heightened examples of Erving Goffman’s front stage/back stage idea. Goffman detailed how there are different sets of rules and expectations for social interactions…
  • When Whites Get a Free Pass

    NYT > Sociology
    23 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Special privileges are often more common than conscious bias.
  • Professor of Sociology - The Conversation AU

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News
    3 Mar 2015 | 2:45 pm
    Professor of SociologyThe Conversation AUThe School of Sociology at ANU has an exciting program of research and teaching that combines the strengths of the conceptual and applied approaches of the discipline. Our research and teaching ethos is orientated to the critical analysis of social ...and more »
 
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • Professor of Sociology - The Conversation AU

    3 Mar 2015 | 2:45 pm
    Professor of SociologyThe Conversation AUThe School of Sociology at ANU has an exciting program of research and teaching that combines the strengths of the conceptual and applied approaches of the discipline. Our research and teaching ethos is orientated to the critical analysis of social ...and more »
  • Gender Is Focus of Sociology Week - CSUF News

    3 Mar 2015 | 10:53 am
    Gender Is Focus of Sociology WeekCSUF NewsPresident Mildred García joins students, faculty and a special keynote speaker as part of this year's Sociology Week program. The March 9-12 program kicks off with García presenting "Women Leaders in America: It's Where We Go From Here That Really ...
  • Notre Dame Sociologists to Lead American Sociological Association's Flagship ... - Newswise (press release)

    26 Feb 2015 | 8:45 am
    Notre Dame Sociologists to Lead American Sociological Association's Flagship Newswise (press release)Newswise — WASHINGTON, DC, February 26, 2015 — The American Sociological Association (ASA) announced this week that it has appointed three sociologists from the University of Notre Dame to serve as the next editors of the American Sociological ...
  • Letter: The duck is dead wrong about sociology's impact - Times Herald-Record

    25 Feb 2015 | 1:47 pm
    Letter: The duck is dead wrong about sociology's impactTimes Herald-RecordThe field of sociology, through the lens of science, provides a necessary and objective view of our society. Ideally all college students should be required to take at least one course in this field. Majoring in sociology does lead to employment in
  • The Sociology of Dead Children - Huffington Post

    12 Feb 2015 | 12:39 pm
    The Sociology of Dead ChildrenHuffington PostYou might call it the sociology of dead kids. There's a lot less here than meets the eye, or so it seemed when I read about a new study by researchers at Yale called "Tragic, but not random: The social contagion of nonfatal gunshot injuries." It's an
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    SOCIOLOGY - Yahoo News Search Results

  • College Graduates 3/3/2015

    3 Mar 2015 | 4:45 am
    ALBRIGHT COLLEGE Anthony Rusnak, Carbondale, Bachelor of Science, biology/sociology/anthropology FORDHAM UNIVERSITY Harrison Weinberger, Waverly, bachelor’s degree in psychology LYCOMING COLLEGE Lynette Dooley, New Milford, bachelor’s degree, biology MISE
  • College graduates

    3 Mar 2015 | 1:17 am
    ALBRIGHT COLLEGE Anthony Rusnak, Carbondale, Bachelor of Science, biology/sociology/anthropology FORDHAM UNIVERSITY Harrison Weinberger, Waverly, bachelor’s degree in psychology LYCOMING COLLEGE Lynette Dooley, New Milford, bachelor’s degree, biology MISE
  • From sociology teacher to sculpture artist

    13 Feb 2015 | 9:47 pm
    Julee Richardson will give talk at art gallery in Richmond
  • Canadian university offers chance to study Cristiano Ronaldo

    6 Feb 2015 | 10:40 am
    The University of British Columbia Okanagan are offering a module on the Ballon d'Or winner for their sociology students due to his impact on Portuguese and global culture
  • Canadian university offers chance to study Ronaldo

    6 Feb 2015 | 4:51 am
    Ever wanted to take a course for which the subject is the three-time Ballon d'Or winner? Now's your chance
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • Sports and Socio-Economic Status: More than Talent Required

    W. W. Norton
    2 Mar 2015 | 10:51 am
    By Colby King and Jakari Griffith, Bridgewater State University Colby King is an Assistant Professor of Sociology; Jakari Griffith is an Assistant Professor of Management Recently, Pittsburgh Pirates star center fielder Andrew McCutchen shared a great essay  on The Players’ Tribune in which he reflects on his path to the pros. In the essay, he responds to the drama surrounding the Jackie Robinson West Little League baseball team, which won the Little League World Series and then had their title taken away for having players on the team who lived outside of their geographic area. The…
  • Middle-Aged Men and Alcohol

    W. W. Norton
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:19 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer We’ve all probably heard the phrase “teen drinking” and thought about it as a social problem. Many public service announcements (PSAs), like the one below, highlight the problem of teen drinking. But data just released from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that 35-64-year-olds are the most likely of any age group to die from drinking too much. And three-quarters of those who die are men. Perhaps we should have PSAs for teens’ fathers and grandfathers. More people 65 and older died of alcohol poisoning than those aged 15-24.  …
  • Globalization: Is the World Getting Smaller or Larger?

    W. W. Norton
    18 Feb 2015 | 2:47 pm
    By Peter Kaufman When I first started teaching, there was one phrase I told myself I would never use in class: “When I was your age . . .” As I am now undeniably in the category of “middle age,” and having been teaching in college classrooms for nearly 20 years, I must come clean and admit that I find myself using that phrase more often than I’d like. My only defense, and I realize it’s somewhat lame, is that things are changing so quickly. Life really was very different when I was in college and sometimes I just can’t help but marvel at these changes aloud. The transformations…
  • Sociology on the Red Carpet

    W. W. Norton
    13 Feb 2015 | 2:47 pm
    By Karen Sternheimer In the entertainment industry, the first two months of the year are unofficially known as awards season. There are more awards shows than most of us know about, culminating with the Academy Awards at the end of February. While it may seem that awards shows are trivial or just entertainment, we can learn several sociological lessons from these events. Both awards shows and pre-show red carpet walks are  heightened examples of Erving Goffman’s front stage/back stage idea. Goffman detailed how there are different sets of rules and expectations for social interactions…
  • The Second Shift and Workplace Policies

    W. W. Norton
    6 Feb 2015 | 1:38 pm
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales In 1989, Arlie Russell Hochschild published her groundbreaking text The Second Shift: Working Parents and the Revolution at Home. For eight years, from 1980-1988, Hochschild and her team of researchers interviewed fifty dual-career heterosexual couples, and observed twelve families at home. In these relationships, she shows that in addition to their jobs in the formal economy, women also engage in a “second shift” of work at home; they take care of most of the household (cleaning and cooking), childcare (homework, bathing, etc.), and additional family care…
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    SagePub: Sociology

  • Care and Repair and the Politics of Urban Kindness

    Hall, T., Smith, R. J.
    5 Feb 2015 | 7:38 am
    This article considers the possibility that small acts of urban care, maintenance and cleaning might make for a good city. This might seem a slim possibility, given the vast sociology of hopelessness to which the contemporary city is home. But it can also be argued that a politics, and a sociology, of hope are best looked for not in big picture or utopian thinking but in the practical instances of everyday care and kindness that are as much a part of the urban everyday as anxiety, insecurity and damage. We explore this possibility through a critical assessment of Nigel Thrift’s recent…
  • Fresh is Best? Social Position, Cooking, and Vegetable Consumption in France

    Plessz, M., Gojard, S.
    5 Feb 2015 | 7:38 am
    This article uses theories of practice to offer new lines of analysis of distinction through food. Middle-class households typically consume more vegetables than lower-class households. We examine aspects of vegetable consumption practices that might explain this fact. After briefly presenting theories of practice, we define vegetable consumption as a practice. We use household purchase data collected in 2007 for 2600 French households to address two questions: (1) is this theoretical framework relevant in accounting for the determinants of fresh and processed vegetable purchases, and (2) how…
  • Picturing Urban Green Attachments: Civic Activists Moving between Familiar and Public Engagements in the City

    Blok, A., Meilvang, M. L.
    5 Feb 2015 | 7:38 am
    In this article, we explore the cultural-political tensions and ambiguities of urban ecology, by way of following how activists move and translate between ‘familiar’ and ‘public’ engagements in the green city. Empirically, we locate our exploration in and around Nordhavnen (The North Harbor), a large-scale sustainable urban development project in Copenhagen. Invoking Laurent Thévenot’s pragmatic sociology of ‘regimes of engagement’, we sketch a culturally sensitive approach to urban ecological activism, highlighting the critical moral…
  • Pearl Jephcott: The Legacy of a Forgotten Sociological Research Pioneer

    Goodwin, J., O'Connor, H.
    5 Feb 2015 | 7:38 am
    While the lives and works of many sociologists have now been well documented, numerous sociologists at the ‘coal face’ of social research remain ignored. Consequently, beyond the contributions of those more ‘well-known’ scholars, considerably more needs to be done to examine the history of our discipline and reassess the significant contributions made by ‘other’ researchers so that we may reappraise what can be learnt from these ‘pioneer scholars’. In this article we focus on Pearl Jephcott (1900–1980), who in a research career spanning 40…
  • Employment, Social Networks and Undocumented Migrants: The Employer Perspective

    Bloch, A., McKay, S.
    5 Feb 2015 | 7:38 am
    This article draws on data from qualitative interviews with ethnic enclave and ethnic economy business entrepreneurs from Chinese, Bangladeshi and Turkish-speaking communities in London. Routes into business and worker recruitment practices are explored, demonstrating the centrality of social capital in the form of family and other social networks within these processes. The article investigates what employers consider the desirable characteristics of workers: trust, kinship, gender, social networks, language compatibility and the needs of the business intersect with racialised notions of…
 
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    Metafilter: Sociology

  • Examples of taboos on holy or religiously influential people?

    mrmanvir
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:59 pm
    Maori chiefs were taboo'd from eating inside their houses, the Jewish Kohen (priests) couldn't handle dead bodies, and clerical classes across religious traditions have required celibacy -- does anyone know of any other examples of taboos on holy or religiously influential people? The cultures can range from contemporary big religions (e.g. Abrahamic) to the animism of small-scale societies - all examples are welcome!! THANKS!
  • Growing pains, should I seek help?

    imagine_dragon
    16 Feb 2015 | 9:05 pm
    I'm a man and in my mid 20's. I'm currently working on attaining my masters in social work, I've been reading up on research and While I'm no psychiatrist I do feel that I have suffered episodes of abandonment. My Stepfather ( who has raised me since I was two) suffered during his upbringing. He never met his father and his mom neglected a lot of her motherly duties. In a lot of ways he raised himself. I believe that his upbringing had everything to do with why he could never display signs of affection towards me growing up. I received the material satisfactions from my father but emotionally…
  • Not intelligent enough to become a social researcher?

    RearWindow
    16 Feb 2015 | 5:53 pm
    Lately, I have seem to have doubts about my intelligence; particularly with the notion of becoming a social researcher. I have always wanted to explore the field of social research. I have a penchant for learning new knowledge and theories; my curiosity never seems to wane. However, I have little confidence that I'm able to obtain a Master's Degree in Critical Sociology. I need to build my confidence and reassure myself that I have the capability, passion, devotion, and worth ethic to learn and strive towards this career goal. I would be most appreciated for some scope of advice, tips, and…
  • Does a bloodied face signify the end of a fist fight?

    BleachBypass
    7 Dec 2014 | 2:21 pm
    I am trying to find some confirmation (or refutation) of the idea that at least in some contexts (schoolyard fisticuffs and other low-stakes, non-lethal brawls) the bloodying of one combatant's face is a kind of an "okay, the fight is over, we have a winner, everyone go home" signal. I feel like I've read this idea before - that it satisfies something primal and archetypal about a violent confrontation - mostly when the violence is status-driven, as opposed to, say, a violent crime where the stakes might be higher and the outcomes more dire. In Facing Violence, Rory Miller talks about how…
  • Can you find the lecture about doxxing and vigilantes?

    Monochrome
    31 Oct 2014 | 12:09 pm
    Circa 2010 I saw a video of a talk on dangers of twitter and hacktivism. The man giving this presentation gave an example of a tweet that angered hacktivists. One of them doxxed the twitter user and found out his/her address. A flash mob of angry people showed up at the doorstep. But the wrong address had been used. Then someone died (the homeowner? someone in the crowd? I can't recall.) The speaker emphasized that this scenario was fictional, but its constituent phenomena are real. He said it was only a matter of time before it came true. Does anyone have a link to this video?
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    scatterplot

  • piketty on piketty: it’s not just r > g

    Dan Hirschman
    5 Feb 2015 | 9:02 pm
    Thomas Piketty has just published an interesting follow-up to his epic Capital in the 21st Century (a book important enough to already have its own wikipedia page). Perhaps the most surprising claim he makes is that commentators have put too much emphasis on the role of “r > g” in his analysis of the dynamics of inequality: … the way in which I perceive the relationship between r > g and wealth inequality is often not well-captured in the discussion that has surrounded my book… I do not view r > g as the only or even the primary tool for considering changes in…
  • the normative aspects of positive thinking

    Dan Hirschman
    3 Feb 2015 | 11:46 am
    I love economics papers with “optimal” in the title. When I was first starting out in sociology, I planned to study immigration, remittances, and development. For a literature review I was working on, I spent some time reading about the economics of migration. I came across a gem titled Optimal Migration: A World Perspective. The first line of the abstract struck me as a brilliant example of “the normative aspects of positive thinking” – the way that economics sometimes emphasizes the normative conclusions of seemingly positive models. Here it is: We ask what…
  • the imitation game

    jeremy
    2 Feb 2015 | 4:25 pm
    Quote from Alan Turing that I came across while reading Lee and Wagenmakers’s Bayesian Cognitive Modeling: “I assume that the reader is familiar with the idea of extra-sensory perception, and the meaning of the four items of it, viz. telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition and psycho-kinesis. These disturbing phenomena seem to deny all our usual scientific ideas. How we should like to discredit them! Unfortunately the statistical evidence, at least for telepathy, is overwhelming.”
  • assessing james coleman

    jeremy
    30 Jan 2015 | 12:45 pm
    From Sharon McGrayne’s The Theory That Would Not Die, about Bayesian statistics (versus frequentism): The chasm between the two schools of statistics crystallized for [Howard] Raiffa when Columbia professors discussed a sociology student named James Coleman. During his oral examination Coleman seemed “confused and fuzzy . . . clearly not of Ph.D. quality.” But his professors were adamant that he was otherwise dazzling. Using his new Bayesian perspective, Raiffa argued that the department’s prior opinion of the candidate’s qualities was so positive that a one-hour exam should not…
  • one book, one _____

    jeremy
    28 Jan 2015 | 10:07 am
    My favorite contemporary novel, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, is the selection for One Book, One Chicago. I was surprised when I heard this, because I thought, “But… it’s a novel.” I realized that I’d just assumed that the trajectory of One Book, One Northwestern was a general phenomenon, where the history has been: 2014-5: Whistling Vivalidi, Claude Steele (non-fiction) 2013-4: Last Hunger Season, Roger Thurow (non-fiction) 2012-3: Never a City So Real, Alex Kotlowitz (non-fiction) 2011-2: Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Rebecca Skloot…
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  • PERC Events

    Will
    13 Feb 2015 | 7:26 am
    In case I haven't already tweeted about it enough, I've been in the process of setting up a new Political Economy Research Centre (PERC) at Goldsmiths over the last few months, together with some great colleagues. PERC sits alongside our new heterodox PPE degree, which is currently in its first year. You can read about our research ambitions and interests on the website. Hopefully there will be projects and publications to follow. In the meantime, here are two events that are open to all (registration via Eventbrite links is required), both at Goldsmiths: 'From REcovery to…
  • Neoliberalism discussion on Novara

    Will
    3 Feb 2015 | 1:53 am
    Last week I was a guest on Novara FM, to discuss neoliberalism with Aaron Bastani. You can listen to the show here. In case that's not enough neoliberalism discussion, I gave a talk on a similar topic of 'what is neoliberalism?' at The Big Ideas last summer, which is available here.
  • the seduction of behaviorism

    Will
    13 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    I have a piece in The New Inquiry, entitled 'The Data Sublime', exploring the strange everyday appeal of technologies of surveillance and control. My tentative hypothesis is that there is something psychoanalytic going on here, involving the desire to be dominated by incomprehensible data analytics, which liberal assumptions about 'trade-offs' (between freedom and security, or autonomy and convenience etc) completely overlook. Here's a chunk: The notorious Facebook experiment on “emotional contagion” was understandably controversial. But would it be implausible to…
  • Governing through unhappiness

    Will
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:24 am
    Every sector, every profession, which can plausibly lay a claim to the 'public interest', is currently resisting austerity in one simple fashion: claiming that by hitting the sector or profession concerned, the real losers will be the public. Ironically the one industry that is now the greatest recipient of public financial beneficence, namely financial services, seems to have lost all sense of the public ever having an interest in the first place. I guess that's how they achieved such an extraordinary level of political arbitrage in the first place. So more fool the rest of us.
  • Economic sociology of neoliberalism - interview recording

    Will
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:49 am
    I strongly recommend the economic sociology blog, Estudios de la Economia, run by Jose Ossandon and Tomas Undurraga. One of the nice things about the interviews they publish is how they break the questions down, and upload each answer separately, meaning you don't have to dive into one vast hour-long MP3. They've just published an interview I did with them a few weeks ago, discussing my book. It's the most theoretical and sociological discussion I've yet had about the book, and was provoked by some very sharp questions.
 
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    orgtheory.net

  • response to lizardo on the death of theory in sociology

    fabiorojas
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:16 pm
    A little while back, Omar released a pamphlet called The End of Theorists. It’s an essay on the state of theory in sociology and some possibilities for the future. Originally given as address to the junior theorist’s symposium, he expanded it into an essay. Omar’s bad news is that the official role of “theorist” has been eroded in sociology. The good news is that one can come up with a new role for theorists that creates a new position for them in the profession. My summary is pithy and leaves out a lot, so I strongly recommend that you read the original. My…
  • congratulations to the new asr editors!

    fabiorojas
    2 Mar 2015 | 7:13 pm
    Ding dong! Congratulations to Rory McVeigh, Omar Lizardo, and Sarah Mustillo on being named the incoming editors of the American Sociological Review. I wish them all the best and I look forward to being rejected by them! A few interesting notes: First, if you ever wondered whether blogging damages your career chances, this should put your fears to rest. Second, on Twitter, I asked Omar about the problem of endless R&R’s, rotating reviewers, and other problems that have plagued the current incarnation of the journal. Omar directed me to the proposal that he submitted with Rory and…
  • free grad skool rulz book….

    fabiorojas
    1 Mar 2015 | 11:08 pm
    … if you attend any of the book talks listed below. I’ll send a free copy to a friend if you live tweet the talk w/photo. 50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street!! 
  • party in the street: new york, chicago and washington, DC!!! come to the talks!

    fabiorojas
    1 Mar 2015 | 8:33 pm
    My friend and co-author Michael Heaney will be speaking about Party in the Street this week. Here is the info: On Monday, Michael will be in Washington, will be at Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC. 6:30 pm, catch it if you can. On Tuesday, Michael will be in Chicago at the Seminary Coop bookstore. They will be starting a series called “Fresh Ayers” where Chicago activist Bill Ayers will host a series of book talks. Michael will be is the first guest. On Wednesday, Michael will be in New York (yes, I know, he’s a busy guy) at Books and Culture. He will be hosted by Dan…
  • collective memory & presidents – a guest post by raj ghoshal

    fabiorojas
    24 Feb 2015 | 9:41 am
    This guest post is by Raj Ghoshal, an assistant professor of sociology at Goucher College. Previously we discussed presidents and collective memory in these two posts: Warren G. Harding is awesome & popular presidents kill people. Presidents’ Day had me thinking about presidential rankings and collective memory. We commonly learn that a certain set of our presidents were great, while others were not – and for presidencies we (or our parents) didn’t personally live through, history textbooks and teachers are often the messengers. But how do presidential historians determine…
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Is That Evidence in Your Pocket, or Are You Just Writing an Op-Ed?

    25 Feb 2015 | 6:35 pm
    February 25, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonNobody looks to USA Today op-eds for methodologically scrupulous research. Even so, James Alan Fox’s opinion piece this morning (here) was a bit clumsy. Fox was arguing against the idea that allowing guns on campus would reduce sexual assaults.You have to admit, the gunlovers’ proposal is kind of cute. Conservatives are ostensibly paying attention to a liberal issue – the victimization of women – but their policy proposal is one they know liberals will hate. Next thing you know, the “guns everywhere” folks will be proposing concealed carry…
  • Predicting the Oscars

    22 Feb 2015 | 7:55 am
    February 22, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonOf the films nominated for Best Picture, “American Sniper” is the clear winner at the box office. But will it will win Best Picture? or Director? or Actor?  Nobody thinks so, even its ardent supporters on the political right. How do they know?It’s not like elections, where a hundred polls blossom to survey voters. Google Consumer Surveys did as the public (though not a random sample), and Sniper easily picked off the competition. David Leonhardt at the New York Times (here) provided this graph:(Click on a graphic for a larger view.)But the…
  • My Sweet Old et al.

    15 Feb 2015 | 7:59 pm
    February 15, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonSome fashions trickle down through the social class lattice.  It’s as though people look to those just above them to see what they’re wearing or what names they’re giving their kids. I see the same process with some words, though the crucial dimension is not wealth but apparent intelligence or education. You hear someone use the word fortuitous. It sounds so much more sophisticated than fortunate, and it seems to mean the same thing. So you swap out the more pedestrian term, and the next time you catch a lucky break, you say that it was…
  • The Very Reasonable Dutch

    11 Feb 2015 | 3:48 am
    February 11, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonAn early post on this blog (here) compared two ways of framing bad behavior – as an evil to be punished or as a problem to be solved. The behavior was trivial and hardly evil – men peeing carelessly rather than mindfully, with reeking men’s rooms the result. The Amsterdam solution exemplified the Dutch problem-solving approach. Americans, I imagined, would have relied on punishment.Peter Moskos has taken his Cop in the Hood blog to Amsterdam for a short while, and he reports on a similarly rational approach to a real problem. Amsterdam has long…
  • Making Memories

    10 Feb 2015 | 12:13 pm
    February 10, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonAn article in the Science section of today’s New York Times (here) says pretty much what I said in the previous post about memory and Brian Williams.  The author, Tara Parker-Pope, even uses the same metaphor – that most people think of memory as a video camera.Here is how Parker-Pope puts it:But the truth is our memories can deceive us — and they often do.Numerous scientific studies show that memories can fade, shift and distort over time. Not only can our real memories become unwittingly altered and embellished, but entirely new false…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Gender and Citation in Four General-Interest Philosophy Journals, 1993-2013

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Last Thursday I gave a talk at the American Philosophical Association’s Central Division meetings about patterns in publication and citation in some of the field’s major journals. I have a more extensive analysis of the data that’s almost done, but that deserves a paper of its own rather than a post. Here I’ll confine myself mostly to descriptive material about some broad trends, together with a bit of discussion at the end. I examined patters of publication and citation in four high-prestige, nominally general-interest journals within Anglo-American philosophy. The…
  • Another Look at the California Vaccination Data

    2 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Update: Updated to identify Catholic schools. (And again later, with more Catholic schools ID’d.) I took another look at the vaccination exemption data I discussed the other day. This time I was interested in getting a closer look at the range of variation between different sorts of schools. My goal was to extract a bit more information about the different sorts of elementary schools in the state, just using the data from the Health Department spreadsheet. As we saw before, the smaller the unit of observation the more variability we are likely to uncover. So, looking at the rate of…
  • Vaccination Exemptions in California Kindergartens

    28 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    California Kindergarten PBE Rates by Type of School, 2014-15. (PDF available.) I came across a report this afternoon, via Eric Rauchway, about high rates of vaccination exemption in Sacramento schools. As you are surely aware, this is a serious political and public health problem at the moment. Like Eric, I was struck by just how high some of the rates were. So I went and got the data from the California Department of Public Health, just wanting to take a quick look at it. If you want to follow along, I put up a github repository with the data and R code for the plots. I’ll just confine…
  • American Movie

    19 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Update, January 22nd: Now with plots standardized per thousand films released that year. It’s time for another episode of Data Analysis on the Bus. This one follows from an exchange on Twitter, prompted by the coverage of American Sniper about the tendency to use the word “American” in film titles, especially when you want things to sound terribly serious. This led to a bit of freewheeling and it has to be said perhaps tendentious cultural theorizing on my part. Rather more usefully, it also prompted Benjamin Schmidt to send me some IMDB data containing film titles with the…
  • Failure in Complex Systems

    14 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    After listening to the hosts discuss probability on ATP this week, I was most of the way through writing something that, had I finished it, would have been this Dr Drang post only not nearly as good. (I will confess that my motivation was exactly the same as his: “People believe John”.) In fairness I don’t blame them for getting confused, because probability really is confusing and I’m terrible at it myself. Seeing as the good doctor has already intervened, there’s no need to repeat what he said. But let me add a small coda. Dr Drang wonders why things went off…
 
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  • Rehumanisation (in war) Revisited: Trauma, Social Media, and the Wound Culture of Islamic State

    candicedowson
    1 Mar 2015 | 11:53 am
    Coming soon It seems fitting to now revisit my earlier blog on the Islamic State phenomenon and the issue of rehumanisation in war, due to recent developments and headlines. Rehumanisation and war do not easily fit together; the former suggests equality and humanity; the latter suggests winners and losers. Nevertheless in the 21st Century and this age of 24-hour media, we seek to explain away everything associated with war and find reason and meaning behind it. This is often not logical in the face of war due to its basic nature. It has been personified in the case of Jihadi John, whose…
  • Mosul Eye: Straight from inside hell.

    tonosanchezreig
    1 Mar 2015 | 11:28 am
    Destroying Mosul’s Heritage: We apologize for not updating the page. Like most Iraqis, we have been mourning the unbearable loss of our precious relics. Once again, many unrealistic voices have been asking why the inhabitants of Mosul did nothing to stop the rampage, and once again we will say if stopping the destruction and oppression without arms were possible, 5 million Jews would not have been killed systematically during the Holocaust. There was an average of 10,000 Jews in every concentration camp vs. 50 Nazis. If freeing themselves and fighting back, with their bare hands like many…
  • Knowledge is power - 5 things that make studying worth it

    Carol
    1 Mar 2015 | 10:51 am
    One very smart person, who knows a lot more about blogging that I do (Hi, VROOBELEK) told me once that her secret lies in pointing things out in order to make it more clear for readers. First, I told her that she shouldn’t expect that from me, since what would I be supposed to do? 5 things about Plato’s theory of ideas that makes it really difficult to understand? She laughed and said that would be cool to read. I’ve thought that through and here I am writing this summary. Am I a good blogger now? People tend to say things like: “I don’t need to study…
  • Violence and the Expanding Circle of Empathy

    trevorbashaw
    1 Mar 2015 | 10:34 am
    Contemporary philosopher Peter Singer offers a unique and compelling argument which attempts to explain why violence has seen a decrease as history wears on. In his book The Expanding Circle, he argues that as dominant social structures expand to encompass more and more people, so does our scope for empathy. Homo sapiens originally functioned in small groups which hunted and gathered for survival. This being the case, individuals within the group only had to look out for their extended family, or whoever happened to be in their social unit, to survive and flourish. However, this attitude also…
  • we cry to keep alive

    ThurmanatorX
    1 Mar 2015 | 10:17 am
    …we try an find reasons why the stars aren’t kind yet when we look inward they perfectly align with the rage that we hide and the pride that shields the lies when way down deep we cry to keep alive self medicating to slowly die and because we smile no one ever asks us why…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Marriage more likely to end in divorce when wives get sick, according to ISU study

    4 Mar 2015 | 10:23 am
    Countless couples have recited the words, 'in sickness and in health' on their wedding day with the intention of honoring those vows. But as it turns out, that may be easier said than done. read more
  • Study: Men tend to be more narcissistic than women

    4 Mar 2015 | 9:37 am
    With three decades of data from more than 475,000 participants, a new study on narcissism from the University at Buffalo School of Management reveals that men, on average, are more narcissistic than women. read more
  • People use handshakes to sniff each other out

    3 Mar 2015 | 8:04 am
    Limp or firm, your handshake conveys subliminal social cues. Now, research reveals it also transmits chemical signals that could explain why the greeting evolved in the first place. read more
  • Bumblebees make false memories too

    26 Feb 2015 | 11:08 am
    It's well known that our human memory can fail us. People can be forgetful, and they can sometimes also "remember" things incorrectly, with devastating consequences in the classroom, courtroom, and other areas of life. Now, researchers show for the first time in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on February 26 that bumblebees can be unreliable witnesses too. read more
  • Teacher prejudices put girls off math, science

    26 Feb 2015 | 11:08 am
    It's a fact: Women are vastly underrepresented in the fields of computer science, engineering, and mathematics. But less clear are the trajectories -- academic and otherwise -- that lead young women toward other professions. Higher education has already opened the door to equal opportunities for women and minorities in the U.S. -- so is it possible that elementary school, as a new Tel Aviv University study suggests, is the critical juncture at which girls are discouraged from pursuing science and mathematics? read more
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    Jonathan Rex

  • Two-Spirits and Gender Identity

    jrex365
    2 Mar 2015 | 5:11 pm
    There are a lot of individuals today who believe that gender is a social construct and that there are no inherent differences in the vast majority of males and females. The debate of nature vs nurture isn’t likely to go away any time soon, but it should be made very clear that Native American culture is deeply rooted in celebrating gender differences between males and females. There are many within the LGBT community who are attempting to appropriate Native American culture by claiming that they are Two-Spirited and this is honestly no different than hipsters wearing headdresses. There…
  • Pittsburg State University

    jrex365
    1 Mar 2015 | 6:19 pm
    While working on my Masters in Communication at Pitt State in Southeast Kansas I took this photo of a statue on campus between the student center and the art building. Even though Kansas takes number 1 on my list of the most boring places I’ve ever lived, the constant tornado sirens are enough to drive a person completely insane, the two months of 110 degrees in the summer make you seriously consider murdering somebody and you couldn’t pay me enough to ever live there again I left with a lot of really good memories and one close friend who I’m certain I’ll be in touch…
  • Savage

    jrex365
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:22 pm
    A while back I sat down and wrote lyrics to Kanye West’s “Black Skinhead” instrumental with the upcoming film for 50 Shades of Grey in mind. My wife had stumbled across the story early on as it was being written while we were in college and followed it each time the author posted a new chapter. The story attracted enough readers that the author then published it through a print on demand and it sold enough copies that a major publisher picked it up. It’s now currently a blockbuster mainstream film internationally so I figured I’d go ahead and post what I came up…
  • Identity: Behind The Mask

    jrex365
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:35 pm
    “That you are here—that life exists and identity, that the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse.” This was the answer that Walt Whitman provided at the end of his poem O Me! O Life!. It is a decent answer for those who are questioning the meaning of life, the value of living and why they should continue amidst the realization that in the end everything  we do (or don’t do) is ultimately meaningless. We are here and as long as we exist we will play a role in the powerful play that we call life. But, can we do more than simply play a role and be more than…
  • Visitor Map – February, 2015

    jrex365
    17 Feb 2015 | 1:27 pm
    My website collects stats and today I brought them up to see where all of my visitors are coming from. This is a map showing the month of February, 2015. Off to a decent start. I’ll post another at the end of March to see if there’s been an increase of international visitors or a decrease. Thanks to all of you who have stopped by and made it through at least one of my posts. Hope you make your way back sometime. Special appreciation to those who have returned and continue to do so. It’s nice to know that folks are interested in what I’m writing. When I created this…
 
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