Sociology

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  • The Revolutionary Nature of Same-Sex Marriage

    Sociological Stew
    20 Jul 2015 | 5:31 am
    Same-sex marriage has become legal everywhere in the United States. I have actively supported the extension of marriage rights to same-sex couples for over two decades, and supported LGBT rights in general for forty-five years. One of the reasons that I support marriage rights for same-sex couples is because as a sociologists I know that same-sex marriage has the potential to radically change the nature of marriage and families. I was recently reviewing the original lectures that I wrote fifteen years ago for Kentucky's first fully on-line introductory sociology course.  This was at…
  • why does college cost so much?

    scatterplot
    Dan Hirschman
    8 Jul 2015 | 6:50 am
    If you read popular coverage of higher ed, one of the biggest recurring questions is “why does college cost so much?” There’s no really good answer to this question, in part because it’s poorly phrased. Higher ed is a big field containing several different organizational populations that look very different when it comes to costs and revenues (and student bodies, etc.). The chapters by Scott and Ruef & Nag in this edited volume do a nice job of laying out some of the contours of that diversity. Applying that basic insight suggests that the question “why does…
  • IU sociologist Pavalko named vice provost for faculty and academic affairs - IU Bloomington Newsroom

    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:24 pm
    IU sociologist Pavalko named vice provost for faculty and academic affairsIU Bloomington NewsroomBLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Eliza Pavalko, a sociologist whose research areas include work-life issues and the relationship between career, family and health, has been named Indiana University Bloomington vice provost for faculty and academic affairs. Pavalko ...
  • The School-to-Prison Pipeline

    Everyday Sociology Blog
    W. W. Norton
    3 Aug 2015 | 10:18 am
    By Peter Kaufman When I first heard of the school-to-prison pipeline I thought that it was some sort of exaggeration. How could it be possible, I wondered, for schools to be a direct path to prison? It doesn’t make any sense that primary and secondary schools are serving as the conduits that fill the cells of penal institutions. Unfortunately, this pipeline not only exists and it is not just a mere trickle; it is a strong flowing and steady stream. Every year, thousands of young people experience a direct path from school to juvenile detention centers and then ultimately to prison.
  • Coming together to change the future of education at Google’s Moonshot Summit

    Jisc blog
    g.ellis@jisc.ac.uk
    30 Jul 2015 | 6:26 am
    If you could change anything in the education system, what would your ‘moonshot’ be? This was the question asked of 40 educators, edtech innovators and entrepreneurs from around the world who were invited to Google’s Moonshot for Education Summit in Amsterdam last week, which I was delighted to be able to attend representing Jisc. For those unfamiliar with 'moonshot', when President Kennedy announced the Apollo programme in 1961 space exploration was just beginning, but by 1969 the first people walked on the surface of the moon – a seemingly unthinkable achievement less…
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    SOCIOLOGY NEWS - Google News

  • IU sociologist Pavalko named vice provost for faculty and academic affairs - IU Bloomington Newsroom

    3 Aug 2015 | 12:24 pm
    IU sociologist Pavalko named vice provost for faculty and academic affairsIU Bloomington NewsroomBLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Eliza Pavalko, a sociologist whose research areas include work-life issues and the relationship between career, family and health, has been named Indiana University Bloomington vice provost for faculty and academic affairs. Pavalko ...
  • The sociology of the Korean People's Army - NK News

    2 Aug 2015 | 9:34 pm
    NK NewsThe sociology of the Korean People's ArmyNK NewsBut how do soldiers of the Korean People's Army live when parades are over? There are very few articles dedicated to answering this question. First, the army is rarely studied from a sociologist's point of view. Usually books about military are
  • Death is not the end: The rise and rise of Pierre Bourdieu in US sociology - OUPblog (blog)

    31 Jul 2015 | 1:44 am
    Death is not the end: The rise and rise of Pierre Bourdieu in US sociologyOUPblog (blog)Thirteen years after his death, the French sociologist remains one of the leading social scientists in the world. His work has been translated into dozens of languages (Sapiro & Bustamante 2009), and he is one of the most cited social theorists
  • Abortion, science and sociology - Irish Times

    30 Jul 2015 | 5:16 pm
    Abortion, science and sociologyIrish TimesSir, – Emer O'Toole's claim that “science and sociology are on the side of pro-choice” is wishful thinking (“Science and sociology are on the side of pro-choice”, July 27th). In fact, decades have passed since the amazing advances of science opened a
  • Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Sociology - The Conversation AU

    29 Jul 2015 | 6:09 pm
    Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in SociologyThe Conversation AUThe Sociology Program is located in the School of Humanities and Social Inquiry in the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts. It offers a major in the Bachelor of Arts and contributes to the Bachelor of International Studies, Master in International
 
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    Everyday Sociology Blog

  • The School-to-Prison Pipeline

    W. W. Norton
    3 Aug 2015 | 10:18 am
    By Peter Kaufman When I first heard of the school-to-prison pipeline I thought that it was some sort of exaggeration. How could it be possible, I wondered, for schools to be a direct path to prison? It doesn’t make any sense that primary and secondary schools are serving as the conduits that fill the cells of penal institutions. Unfortunately, this pipeline not only exists and it is not just a mere trickle; it is a strong flowing and steady stream. Every year, thousands of young people experience a direct path from school to juvenile detention centers and then ultimately to prison.
  • Consuming Home

    W. W. Norton
    30 Jul 2015 | 9:44 am
    By Karen Sternheimer Would you be excited to have a high-end brand of shower valve? Most of us probably wouldn’t know the brands of shower valves to be excited one way or the other. I certainly don’t. But when a contractor came to give us an estimate for replacing our shower, he said he had connections and could “upgrade” us to a specific brand, assuming that I knew it signaled high-end plumbing. He promised that if we hired him we could have fancy branded tile at a discount too, giving us “the wow factor I know you’re looking for.” The only “wow” came when we saw how much…
  • Empowerment Zones, Heritage Tourism, and Gentrification in Harlem

    W. W. Norton
    27 Jul 2015 | 10:16 am
    By Teresa Irene Gonzales A recent article in the Guardian discusses the ongoing gentrification of Central Harlem. As I mentioned in a previous post, gentrification in the United States is not only about one ethnic or racial group replacing another one. There is also a social class element, as higher-income residents displace lower-income residents. The active involvement of local city officials and real-estate developers make this happen, through targeted policies and investment. So how does Harlem fit into this? For over a century, Harlem has been home to a large domestic and international…
  • Social (Re)Construction of Place in Columbia, South Carolina

    W. W. Norton
    10 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    By Colby King Assistant Professor of Sociology, Bridgewater State University The ongoing debate about the confederate flag on the grounds of the South Carolina State House reminds us of the power of the symbols we put in our places, and the way we talk about those symbols and those places. The flag’s current position on the northern end of the state house grounds means that it flies in front of one of the busiest intersections in downtown Columbia, that of Main and Gervais Streets. This position lends the flag visibility and prominence. When I first moved to Columbia in August of 2007, that…
  • Racial Construction and Appropriation

    W. W. Norton
    8 Jul 2015 | 11:04 am
    By Sally Raskoff Have you heard about the woman in Spokane, Washington, the former head of the local NAACP chapter who resigned when people discovered that her identified race did not match her ancestry? I’m talking about the case of Rachel Dolezal. With white ancestry but a strong identification with African American realities, she maintains that her racial identity is black. She passed as black by changing her appearance until her parents spoke to the media about their confusion with her mismatched self-identity. Subsequent interviews brought up questions about her mental health and other…
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    Jisc blog

  • Coming together to change the future of education at Google’s Moonshot Summit

    g.ellis@jisc.ac.uk
    30 Jul 2015 | 6:26 am
    If you could change anything in the education system, what would your ‘moonshot’ be? This was the question asked of 40 educators, edtech innovators and entrepreneurs from around the world who were invited to Google’s Moonshot for Education Summit in Amsterdam last week, which I was delighted to be able to attend representing Jisc. For those unfamiliar with 'moonshot', when President Kennedy announced the Apollo programme in 1961 space exploration was just beginning, but by 1969 the first people walked on the surface of the moon – a seemingly unthinkable achievement less…
  • Re-balancing the power in our digital colonies

    c.covington@jisc.ac.uk
    23 Jul 2015 | 4:01 am
    Recently, Lawrie Phipps, senior co-design manager, published a blog post referring to digital colonialism and its potential to destroy any kind of pedagogic innovation.   PodcastIn this accompanying podcast, Simon Thomson considers how digital pedagogies can support innovation.Play audioThe underlying argument is that current approaches to learning technologies are archaic and stifle effective learning in a modern digital age. Although the term “colonialism” is an uncomfortable one, it is perhaps indicative of the way in which we deploy digital spaces within education. One aspect…
  • Publish or be damned? Starting a university press – the perks, pitfalls and benefits

    c.covington@jisc.ac.uk
    23 Jul 2015 | 2:54 am
    We all recognise that good learning resources are key to students’ success at university. Encouraging students to buy textbooks has always been a struggle – tuition fees, living expenses and plain old having fun can all make demands on a tight student budget.   Libraries play their part by providing as many core textbooks as they can, but can’t always meet student demand. To solve the problem, some universities are now looking at publishing textbooks themselves, but why?The perksGoing digitalThere’s no doubt that technology makes it easier for students to access the…
  • Periscope: top tips for using Twitter’s latest app

    kirsty.hill@jisc.ac.uk
    17 Jul 2015 | 1:15 am
    Periscope is a mobile app, which allows you to stream live videos from your mobile device directly onto Twitter.   I recently used Periscope to broadcast live from our Connect More event in Wales, which provided an opportunity for UK higher education (HE) and further education (FE) professionals to learn about the latest technology and how it can benefit the student experience. I can see a number of ways Periscope could be used to do this:Live tours of a university campus before open days as a way to engage with potential learnersGetting students into inaccessible places at…
  • It's good to share: breaking down barriers in information

    nathalie.carter@jisc.ac.uk
    10 Jul 2015 | 8:53 am
    Education is showing business the way by using technology to collaborate and share information, and it’s vital that we continue to support this. But how do we do so responsibly and safely? Andrew Cormack has recently written a chapter, included in the forthcoming book Digital Futures, which brings together a number of expert briefings on digital technologies for education and research. Here, he gives us a sneak preview of his advice.Education leading the wayPeople sometimes say to me that I must have a terrible time in my job – because the perception of universities’ networks is…
 
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    Uncommon Thought Journal

  • Sea levels have risen six meters or more with just slight global warming: Study

    Rowan Wolf
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:57 am
    By A. Dutton, A. E. Carlson,  etal[Photo: Tarawa drowning under rising seas. Erin McGee / wikipedia.]A new review analyzing three decades of research on the historic effects of melting polar ice sheets found that global sea levels have risen at least six meters, or about twenty feet, above present levels on multiple occasions over the past three million years.What is most concerning, scientists say, is that amount of melting was caused by an increase of only 1-2 degrees (Celsius) in global mean temperatures.Results of the study are being published this week in the journal…
  • A guide to understanding our times

    Rowan Wolf
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:56 am
    By William T. HathawayA review of Recollection of Things Learned By Gaither StewartGaither Stewart is a man of passions. In The Europe Trilogy he shared with us his passion for international espionage and intrigue. In Voices from Pisalocca he shared his passion for village life in his adoptive country, Italy. In The Fifth Sun he shared his passion for Native-American mythology. Now in Recollection of Things Learned he shares his passion for socialism, both the complexity of its theory and the clash of its praxis.In his new book Stewart shows how capitalism inevitably divides humanity through…
  • Appreciation for the Poet

    Rowan Wolf
    2 Aug 2015 | 6:43 am
    By Gaither Stewart, Senior EditorE. L. Doctorow January 6, 1931 – July 21, 2015My most beloved poet, the American novelist with the Slavic name, E.L. Doctorow, a third generation Russian Jew, is gone. Edgar Lawrence (named after Edgar Allen Poe), was born in the Bronx in New York City just as he was supposed to. That inveterate heavy smoker Doctorow died of lung cancer at the age of 84 in Manhattan as I imagine he was destined to. In my estimation he was much too young, considering what he might have yet created in his remarkable style which if I could choose I would wholeheartedly…
  • The Racist Killing Fields in the US: The Death of Sandra Bland

    Rowan Wolf
    2 Aug 2015 | 6:41 am
     By Henry A. Giroux, Contributing Editor[Photo: Sandra Bland who died in police custody. Facebook photo.]On July 9, soon after Sandra Bland, a 28-year-old African-American woman, moved to Texas from Naperville, Illinois, to take a new job as a college outreach officer at her alma mater, Prairie View A&M, she was pulled over by the police for failing to signal while making a lane change. What followed has become all too common and illustrates the ever-increasing rise in domestic terrorism in the United States. She was pulled out of the car by the police for allegedly becoming…
  • Comcast Orders MSNBC To Remove Anti-TPP Hosts

    Rowan Wolf
    31 Jul 2015 | 6:18 am
    By Ring of Fire[Graphic courtesy Ring Of Fire.][Editorial Note: This is HUGE and speaks directly to The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). TAKE THIS VIRAL]Farron Cousins: Comcast representatives, this is according to Wikileaks, some of the information that’s come out, Comcast representatives, along with representatives from Halliburton, Bectel, Exxon, all of the other corporations – the usual suspects – were at the negotiating table when the Trans-Pacific Partnership was being discussed.”When it comes to coverage of the Trans Pacific Partnership, no one in the corporate…
 
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    Sociological Stew

  • The Revolutionary Nature of Same-Sex Marriage

    20 Jul 2015 | 5:31 am
    Same-sex marriage has become legal everywhere in the United States. I have actively supported the extension of marriage rights to same-sex couples for over two decades, and supported LGBT rights in general for forty-five years. One of the reasons that I support marriage rights for same-sex couples is because as a sociologists I know that same-sex marriage has the potential to radically change the nature of marriage and families. I was recently reviewing the original lectures that I wrote fifteen years ago for Kentucky's first fully on-line introductory sociology course.  This was at…
  • Inequality, Global Warming and the Western Drought

    14 Jun 2015 | 5:23 pm
    It seems to me highly likely that the capitalist elite, the wealthy owners and controllers of large energy corporations such as the oil companies and people like the Koch brothers know full-well that global warming is real, that it is propelled by human carbon emissions, and its negative consequences like heat extremes, drought, rising oceans and severe weather extremes are real as well.  These are intelligent people, they have to be to manage their huge corporate and financial empires. They are certainly at least as intelligent as U.S. military leaders who have been convinced for years…
  • How much control do parents have?

    9 Nov 2014 | 5:30 pm
    I read a Facebook post this morning by a young woman I know - mother of two daughters - and found myself utterly surprised to find that I no longer agree with her position. She said:"With few exceptions, kids are the way they are because that's how they're being TRAINED. If we don't like the current situation, we must do something differently."I might have said that myself forty years ago as a young sociologist. We sociologists were trained to think primarily in terms of nurture, and to lay everything at the foot of the "socialization" process. But I've seen a lot in the past 40 years and…
  • confessions of a former optimist

    6 Sep 2014 | 6:56 pm
    I have always been an optimist. Or perhaps I should say I was always an optimist until the last few years. This has little or nothing to do with my personal life experiences. I maintained an optimistic outlook during unemployment, poverty, cancer, divorce, and many other personal trials, and recent years have been kind to my husband and I in many ways. Moreover, my optimism  was not based on ignorance of the worlds problems and issues. My parents brought me up to be highly aware of the dire circumstance of poverty, war, brutality, pain and suffering that others in the world…
  • Why the Rich Hate Obama

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:23 am
    This morning I ran across an article "The Best Worst President Ever" by Mark Morford in SF Gate.  Morford observes a wealthy beneficiary of the economy under Obama proclaim Obama the "worst president ever." Morford then proceeds to give a litany of economic facts that provide ample evidence that this wealthy individual is almost certainly benefiting greatly from the economy during Obama's presidency. In the end Morford just laughs, and shakes his head at the "bizarre lament" of these crazy rich bastards. His only explanation is simple racism - rich white guys can't stand it that a black…
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    scatterplot

  • do economists make (health) policy? aca edition

    Dan Hirschman
    28 Jul 2015 | 7:34 am
    The influence of economists on policymaking is a topic of perennial interest to sociologists, and one I’ve spent a fair bit of time trying to understand. One of the arguments Beth Berman and I stress in our review piece on the subject is the importance of institutional position inside the policymaking apparatus. Economic ideas dominate certain federal agencies because economists (and MPPs trained by economists, etc.) staff those agencies. Academic economists have a clear route towards policy influence through their counterparts inside the government. A new paper by Glied and Miller…
  • use the asa app with this one weird trick!

    tina
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:09 am
    This year, the ASA meetings will have an app with more features than you can shake a stick at. If you are a careful planner and be sure to log in when browsing the online program, you can add sessions to your schedule, and they will automatically download to a calendar feature on your app. There are also maps of each floor of the hotels, so it will be much easier to find your way around. I haven’t tried it yet, but it even boasts a feature to give you directions to a particular room. If you know the author of a paper at the session you are heading to next, you can search for their name,…
  • blog party: twelfth time’s a charm!

    Dan Hirschman
    26 Jul 2015 | 9:09 am
    As July comes to a close, sociologists set their sites on the impending annual meetings. Apart from scrambling to finish our papers, and struggling to figure out which panels we are supposed to attend, the most important part of prepping for ASA is deciding where to drink. In furtherance of that last goal, we at the Scatterplot party planning committee are delighted to announce the twelfth annual blog party, the can’t miss event of the blogger social season! Details: The 12th Annual Blog Get-Together Sunday, Aug 23 at 6:30pm Brando’s Speakeasy 343 S. Dearborn Street, a short…
  • ask a scatterbrain: managing workflow.

    jessica
    20 Jul 2015 | 3:12 am
    As I have admitted before, I am a terrible electronic file-keeper. If I was to count up the minutes I have wasted in the last 15 years searching for files that should have been easy to find or typing and retyping Stata code that would have (and should have) been a simple do-file or doing web searches for things that I read that I thought I wanted to include in lectures or powerpoints or articles but couldn’t place, I fear I would discover many months of my life wasted as a result of my organizational ineptitude. For a long while, these bad habits only affected me (and the occasional…
  • why does college cost so much?

    Dan Hirschman
    8 Jul 2015 | 6:50 am
    If you read popular coverage of higher ed, one of the biggest recurring questions is “why does college cost so much?” There’s no really good answer to this question, in part because it’s poorly phrased. Higher ed is a big field containing several different organizational populations that look very different when it comes to costs and revenues (and student bodies, etc.). The chapters by Scott and Ruef & Nag in this edited volume do a nice job of laying out some of the contours of that diversity. Applying that basic insight suggests that the question “why does…
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    orgtheory.net

  • no duty to obey migration law: a kingian analysis

    fabiorojas
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:01 pm
    How do we know if restrictionism is unjust? Is it ethically good or bad to prevent migration between countries? In this post, I draw on Martin Luther King Jr.’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail to argue that restriction laws are unjust. King sets out the problem and offers a solution: “How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust? A just law is a man made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law.” In other words, there is no intrinsic demand that the law be followed. You don’t have…
  • joyce bell on black power professionals

    fabiorojas
    2 Aug 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Joyce Bell, a sociologist at Pitt, is one of the leading scholars on Black Power. Her new book, The Black Power Movement and American Social Work, discusses how the Black Power movement changed the profession of social work and gives us insights into how cultural nationalism shaped organizational fields in the 1970s. Here is an interview with Bell at The Society Pages. Other discussions of Black Power: I praise and critique Josh Bloom & Waldo Martin on the Black Panthers; I am interviewed about Black Power and higher education; Bryan Caplan discusses From Black Power; a sort of…
  • still at gencon…

    fabiorojas
    1 Aug 2015 | 5:01 pm
    50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street
  • since i am at gencon, you’re gonna watch baby sloth videos

    fabiorojas
    30 Jul 2015 | 5:01 pm
    50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)From Black Power/Party in the Street
  • the bio-complexity challenge to economics

    fabiorojas
    29 Jul 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Economics is fun to criticize, but hard to replace. Everybody thinks they can do better. How many times have you read an article lampooning the rational actor model or slamming the efficient markets hypothesis? Well, another research group has appeared that tries to offer a replacement. From New Scientist: Earlier this year, several dozen quiet radicals met in a boxy red building on the outskirts of Frankfurt, Germany, to plot just that. The stated aim of this Ernst Strüngmann Forum at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies was to create “a new synthesis for economics”. But the…
 
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    Montclair SocioBlog

  • Margin of Error Error

    3 Aug 2015 | 4:32 am
    August 3, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe margin of error is getting more attention than usual in the news. That’s not saying much since it’s usually a tiny footnote, like those rapidly muttered disclaimers in TV ads (“Offer not good mumble mumble more than four hours mumble mumble and Canada.”) Recent headlines proclaim, “Trump leads Bush. . .” A paragraph or two in, the story will report that in the recent poll Trump got 18% and Bush 15%.  That difference is well within the margin of error, but you have to listen closely to hear that. Most people don’t want to know abut…
  • “Trainwreck” and Taboo

    30 Jul 2015 | 8:33 am
    July 30, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonI saw “Trainwreck” last night. The 7:00 p.m. showing at the 68th Street AMC was full. Maybe people had come just to get out of the apartment and yet avoid the beastly heat, but they enjoyed the movie.  Sometimes the laughter lasted long enough to cover up the next joke. The “Trainwreck” story is standard rom-com: Amy Schumer plays a young woman who rejects the idea of commitment and love. Circumstances put her together with a man she seems to have nothing in common with. You can guess the rest. But this is Amy Schumer’s movie, so there’s…
  • Mass Shootings – Definitions and Data

    28 Jul 2015 | 1:39 pm
    July 28, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonA few days ago, I wrote to date, since Sandy Hook, the US has had seventy-five “mass shootings.” I now put that phrase in quotation marks because taken literally, it’s misleading. Here is the opening from a story in the New Orleans Times-Picayune (here) posted Sunday night.4 shot in assault rifle attack at Desire's Sampson parkA man armed with an assault rifle opened fire at a crowded park in Desire Sunday (July 26), shooting at least four people, including a man left critically wounded, New Orleans police said.  Is this a mass shooting? Not in…
  • Bet on Obamacare, Cash in Big

    26 Jul 2015 | 2:40 pm
    July 26, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonThe standard conservative line on Obamacare was that it would be a disaster.  They still insist that it’s a disaster, despite much evidence to the contrary. I wonder if they put their money where their scowling mouths were. As Alex Tabarrok says, a bet is a tax on bullshit. Did they bet against healthcare and insurance companies? Probably not. But if they had, their frowns would not be turning to smiles. Just the opposite. A hedge fund, Glenview Capital Management, did bet, but they bet on Obamacare, not against it. In case you missed the Wall…
  • Still Not the Time

    24 Jul 2015 | 2:17 pm
    July 24, 2015Posted by Jay LivingstonCan we talk about guns now? I mean now that another angry nut has opened fire, this one in a movie theater in Louisiana. Is it finally time to talk about guns? Of course not.  Just ask the governor of Louisiana, Bobby Jindal.Now is the time for prayer, now is the time for healing. As far as the political spectrum, this isn’t the time. Somehow, I don’t think that Jindal will tell us when it actually is time. Last October I wrote (here):Guns have become the elephant in the room that nobody talks about. Even asking about access to guns seems…
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    Blogs on kieranhealy.org

  • Sex Gaps by Cohort in New Zealand Electoral Constituencies

    31 Jul 2015 | 4:19 am
    The other day, Jonathan Marshall posted a nice graphic showing population age profiles of electoral constituencies in New Zealand, ordered by their tendency to vote left or right. He put the data on github, and on a long transatlantic flight yesterday I ended up messing around with it a bit. Almost the only bit of Demography I know is the old saw that women get sicker but men die quicker. So I thought I’d take a look at differences in the sex composition of age cohorts by constituency. The idea would be that there should be a lot more females in the upper age cohorts, and perhaps more…
  • Apple Sales Trends Q2 2015

    21 Jul 2015 | 11:48 pm
    In an effort to not lose all of my lucrative Consulting Thinkfluanalyst income to the snowman, I redrew my LOESS and LTS decompositions of Apple’s quarterly sales data by product. They now extend to Q2 2015. First, here’s a plot of the trends showing the individual sales figures with a LOESS smoother fitted to them. Figure 1. Quarterly sales data for Apple Macs, iPhones, and iPads. Here’s the Mac by itself, which continues to grow healthily (unlike the rest of the PC industry), just on a smaller scale than other Apple products. Figure 2. Quarterly sales data for Apple Macs.
  • Sleeping Beauties in Philosophy

    27 Jun 2015 | 4:11 am
    The other day at Daily Nous, Justin asked about so-called “Sleeping Beauty” papers in Philosophy: “Sleeping Beauty” papers “lie dormant for years before experiencing a sudden spike in citations as they are discovered and recognized as important.” A recent article in Nature discussed scientific papers that have slumbered for decades … Are there sleeping beauty papers in philosophy? (I mean, of course, besides that paper of yours from a few years back that no one has cited…yet.) Which have slumbered the longest? Who was their “prince”? I’ve been doing some…
  • America's Ur-Choropleths

    12 Jun 2015 | 6:50 am
    Choropleth maps of the United States are everywhere these days, showing various distributions geographically. They’re visually appealing and can be very effective, but then again not always. They’re vulnerable to a few problems. In the U.S. case, the fact that states and counties vary widely in size and population means that they can be a bit misleading. And they make it easy to present a geographical distribution to insinuate an explanation. Together the results can be frustrating. Gabriel Rossman remarked to me a while ago that most choropleth maps of the U.S. for whatever…
  • Fake Science, Real Consequences

    20 May 2015 | 7:20 am
    This morning, Social Science Twitter is consumed by the discovery of fraud in a very widely-circulated political science paper published last year in Science magazine. “When contact changes minds: An experiment on transmission of support for gay equality”, by Michael LaCour and Donald Green, reported very strong and persistent changes in people’s opinion about same-sex marriage when voters were canvassed by a gay person. The paper appeared to have a strong experimental design and, importantly, really good follow-up data. Can a single conversation change minds on divisive…
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    Work, Employment & Society current issue

  • Book review: Satnam Virdee, Racism, Class and the Racialized Outsider

    Holgate, J.
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
  • Book review symposium: Linda McDowell, Working Lives: Gender, Migration and Employment in Britain, 1945-2007

    McIlwaine, C.
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
  • The gender gap in employment hours: do work-hour regulations matter?

    Landivar, L. C.
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    In all developed countries, women, especially mothers, work fewer paid hours than their spouses. However, the magnitude of the gender gap varies significantly by country, ranging from 2 to 20 hours per week in this study. Using data from the 2002 International Social Survey Programme, this article investigates whether work-hour regulations have a significant effect on household allocation of paid labour and gender work-hour inequality. Two main types of work-hour regulations are examined: standard weekly work hours and the maximum allowable weekly work hours. Results show that households in…
  • Gendered work-family conflict in Germany: do self-employment and flexibility matter?

    Konig, S., Cesinger, B.
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    Applying a demands–resource approach, the present empirical study among 1395 individuals researches how flexibility and self-employment affect work–family conflict in Germany. Specifically, gender differences regarding work interference with the family and family interference with work are examined on a strain-based and time-based level. The multivariate results reveal a differentiated but surprisingly non gendered picture of the effect of self-employment and job flexibility regarding work–family conflict. Due to greater flexibility, self-employed people perceive a slightly…
  • Gender differences in working at home and time use patterns: evidence from Australia

    Powell, A., Craig, L.
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    Despite a wealth of research on working at home, few studies have examined the effects of working at home in relation to its regularity and fewer still have used time use studies to do so. Using data from the 2006 Australian Time Use Survey this article investigates the association between working at home, gender and time use, in relation to amount of time spent in paid work, unpaid work and recreational labour, as well as multi-tasking, fragmentation of time and scheduling flexibility. It examines time use patterns according to whether employees do no work at home or whether they work at…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Sociology

  • Introduction to Sociology

    Shashikant Nishant Sharma
    4 Aug 2015 | 12:23 am
    Introduction Sociology is the study of the society and the interaction of the individual to individu
  • I made thirty...2002

    me
    3 Aug 2015 | 7:32 pm
    The pedo remained in prison, and I had sent him a letter some time around here. It was along the lin
  • Deference, Self-Defense and the Death of Sam Dubose

    Mad Sociologist
    3 Aug 2015 | 4:45 pm
    ON CONFLICT CYCLES AND THE POLICE/SUBJECT INTERACTIONS In the last year I’ve offered an explanation of police brutality and community conflicts that, I believe, transcends the simple “racist cop/deserving subject” paradigm (here, here and here). My goal is to try to understand the complex nature of what I see as a conflict cycle existing between police forces as systems, and subjugated communities, especially communities of color. In essence, I combine classic sociological and social psychological research with the Thomas Theorem to suggest that the perceptions of the police…
  • Mass Communications Final Reflection Paper

    Cameron Straughan
    3 Aug 2015 | 4:19 pm
    Mass Communications Final Reflection Paper By: Cameron A. Straughan Student # 205337985 December 20, 2002 Thinking back, Mass Communications related well to my Plan of Study, Communicating Via Environmental Productions, and my Major Project, a documentary about Algonquin Park wolves entitled Eyes of the Wolf. In fact, in addition to other courses I have taken, it helped me build up a strong theoretical and critical foundation for my work. For example, I found the Two-Step Flow theory interesting since it related to my Plan of Study. According to the theory, a filter (i.e., an “opinion…
  • Death Penalty vs. Life Sentence

    awaken world view
    3 Aug 2015 | 3:55 pm
    The death penalty is evil. An eye for an eye will make the world blind. It’s not so hot as abortion or gun laws, but the death penalty debate is a sticky subject that has triggered a debate within. I’ve held to the beliefs that killing is almost never necessary and violence is not a valid solution to conflict, rendering the death penalty overkill. What if a person who committed a crime eligible for the death penalty had a choice to put them self up to be judged for death or life. A modern day Gladiator judgment, but by true peers. It could be a test of moral confidence, or a plea…
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    eScienceNews: Sociology

  • Even moderate picky eating can have negative effects on children's health

    3 Aug 2015 | 7:20 pm
    Picky eating among children is a common but burdensome problem that can result in poor nutrition for kids, family conflict, and frustrated parents. read more
  • Bossy cock takes the lead vocal of cock-a-doodle-do

    24 Jul 2015 | 1:54 pm
    From ancient times, people have been aware of the rooster's "cock-a-doodle-do" that marks the break of dawn, but has anyone wondered who crows first? In a new study published in Scientific Reports, ITbM's biologists have revealed that there is actually a systematic rule based on social ranking that determines the order of crowing in roosters. read more
  • Teens with medical marijuana cards much likelier to say they're addicted

    23 Jul 2015 | 1:05 pm
    A new University of Michigan study finds that teens using marijuana for medical reasons are 10 times more likely to say they are hooked on marijuana than youth who get marijuana illegally. read more
  • New insights into the circuitry of PTSD and mild traumatic brain injury

    23 Jul 2015 | 7:36 am
    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have devastating consequences. Both are associated with high rates of disability and suicide, and although they are separate conditions, they commonly co-occur. For example, a soldier who has developed PTSD as a result of a traumatic experience may have also sustained a brain injury during that experience. read more
  • The emerging science of human screams

    16 Jul 2015 | 11:06 am
    Our noisy world is no match for a screaming infant. An airplane could be flying by as a house party rages on downstairs while a literal cat fight takes place outside, and still a wailing baby will win your attention. One possible explanation, published July 16 in the journal Current Biology, is that human screams possess a unique acoustic property found to activate not just the auditory brain but also the brain's fear circuitry. read more
 
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    Well Written Documents

  • Writing eBooks & Kindle Worlds: Glamorous, Enticing & oh, so Hollywood

    Hope Benefield
    9 Jul 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Fan Fiction, I love you XOXO –Gossip Girl Have you ever wondered what Gossip Girl would have said if Chuck and Blaire’s on-again-off-again relationship went down in flames with a disastrous wedding-day rather than the much expected happily-ever-after? When you … Continue reading →
  • Illiteracy in Alameda County… (Quiet as It’s Kept)

    Charlene Rossell
    14 Jun 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Illiteracy as a State of Being Burdened by illiteracy, an elderly man enters a primary school because he was denied a basic education as a child in the movie called The First Grader.  Now, in his late years, he receives … Continue reading →
  • Fictional Writer, Carrie Bradshaw, on The Pen Versus Love

    Charlene Rossell
    23 May 2014 | 8:00 am
    Writing About Love is a Universal Effort Every great writer, fictional writer or a real-life professional writer, has tried his or her hand at writing about love at one point or another. It has become a topic that stands as an epic abstract … Continue reading →
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    Jonathan Rex

  • Ray Young Bear

    jrex365
    2 Aug 2015 | 12:11 pm
    Ray Young Bear, a Meshkwahkihaki (People of the Red Earth) poet and novelist, sent me an e-mail  a couple days ago to let me know that he’s having a new poem published in the New Yorker tomorrow (August 3 – 2015). Born and raised in Iowa Ray spoke Meskwaki as his first language and began writing poetry early on, publishing his first poem in English in 1968. His writing focuses a great deal on the cognitive dissonance felt by many Native Americans today who are being pulled in different directions culturally. Finding it easier to express himself and accurately convey the…
  • girls (a novel by Nic Kelman)

    jrex365
    23 May 2015 | 2:25 pm
    Stopping by Massolit Café and Books two days ago I noticed that they currently have a spring sale on select titles and skimmed through them, finding four I’d never heard of. When I got home I set them aside and forgot about them until yesterday when I picked up girls by Nic Kelman (that’s not a typo, the g is lowercase) and began reading it without even realizing what I was getting into. While I’ve heard the cliché that you can’t judge a book by its cover a million and one times I personally believe that to be nonsense. I judge books by their cover (and their title). As I scan…
  • Pure Jatomi Fitness

    jrex365
    19 May 2015 | 2:57 pm
    This evening I rode my bike along the river and stopped by Galeria Kazimierz to check out the nearest Jatomi Fitness. I have to be completely honest, the place creeped me the fuck out. If Aldous Huxley had imagined a fitness center in his story Brave New World it would be Jatomi Fitness. What is even more disturbing than the environment is the rapid rate of success that this gym has had since it was established in Warsaw back in 2007 by Mike Balfour and James Balfour. Having come from the United States I never heard of Jatomi Fitness (in the U.S. it is L.A. Fitness that’s disgustingly…
  • Welcome To Krakow

    jrex365
    17 May 2015 | 11:11 am
    On May 1st I moved from Delray Beach in Florida to Krakow, Poland. Fell in love with this city. If you’ve never been here definitely put it on your bucket list of places to see during your life. Just avoid girls with umbrellas who invite you into Strip Clubs and you won’t regret your trip here. Or, if you do go along with them make sure to pay with cash and you won’t return home to discover an enormous bill.
  • Chaim Machlev

    jrex365
    7 May 2015 | 4:29 am
    Chaim Machlev is a tattoo artist based in Berlin who works by individual appointments only.  I came across his tattoos a while back when I was living in the United States. Now that I’m living in Europe it’s definitely on my to-do list to meet up with him to do my first tattoo.
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